英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

<総集編>サッチモMy Life in New Orleans 第6章

chapter 6 (pp89-108) 

 

ARTHUR BROWN was one of my playmates at school. He was a quiet good-looking youngster with nice manners and a way of treating the girls that made them go wild about him. I admired the way he played it cool. He was going with a girl who had a little brother who was very cute. Too cute, I would say, since he was al ways playing with a pistol or a knife. We did not pay much attention to the kid, but one day when he was cleaning his gun he pointed it at Arthur Brown saying "I am going to shoot." Sure enough, he pulled the trigger; the gun was loaded and Arthur Brown fell to the ground with a bullet in his head. 

It was a terrible shock. We all felt so bad that even the boys cried.  

アーサー・ブラウンは僕の学校の友達だった。彼はとてもハンサムで、立ち居振る舞いもよく、女の子の扱いも上手だったので、彼女達は皆彼に夢中だった。彼はそういったことを実に格好良くこなし、僕はいつも感心していた。彼には彼女がいて、その娘には弟がいて、これがまた可愛かった。可愛すぎる、といっておこう。なにしろいつも拳銃や刃物を弄んでいたのだから。僕たちはその子のことはあまり気に留めていたなかった。ところがある日のこと、その子は拳銃を拭いていたら、アーサー・ブラウンに銃口を向けてこう言った「撃つよぉ」。何と本当に彼は引き金を引いてしまったのだ。弾が込められていた。アーサー・ブラウンは頭に弾丸を受け、地に伏した。 

衝撃的な事件だった。僕たちは皆悲しみに暮れ、男連中も泣いたくらいだった。 

[文法] 

a way of treating the girls that made them go wild about him 

彼女達を彼に夢中にさせる女の子達の扱い方(that made them go) 

 

When Arthur was buried we all chipped in and hired a brass band to play at his funeral. Beautiful girls Arthur used to go with came to the funeral from all over the city, from Uptown, Downtown, Front o' Town and Back o' Town. Every one of them was weeping. We kids, all of us teen-agers, were pall bearers. The band we hired was the finest I had ever heard. It was the Onward Brass Band with Joe "King" Oliver and Emmanuel Perez blowing the cornets. Big tall Eddy Jackson booted the bass tuba. A bad tuba player in a brass band can make work hard for the other musi cians, but Eddy Jackson knew how to play that tuba and he was the ideal man for the Onward Brass Band. Best of all was Black Benny playing the bass drum. The world really missed something by not digging Black Benny on that bass drum before he was killed by a prostitute.  

アーサーを埋葬する日、僕達はお金を出し合って葬儀にバンドを呼んだ。生前アーサーと関係のあったきれいな女の子達が、アップタウン、ダウンタウン、フロント・オ・タウン、そしてバック・オ・タウンと、ニューオーリンズ中から参列した。誰もがむせび泣いていた。僕達10代の子供達は、皆で棺を運んだ。僕達が呼んだバンドは、それまで僕が耳にしたバンドの中でも最高だった。オンワードブラスバンドで、ジョー・「キング」・オリバーとエマニュエル・ペレスがコルネットだった。背が高くて大柄なエディー・ジャクソンがテューバの席に新たに入っていた。テューバ吹きというものは、ともするとバンドの他のメンバーが演奏しづらくしてしまうこともあるが、エディー・ジャクソンはバンドのテューバ吹きはどうあるべきかを熟知していて、オンワードブラスバンドにとっては理想的な存在だった。メンバーの中でも一際光るのがバスドラムのブラック・ベニー。彼が後に売春婦に殺害されてしまったことは、世界にとっても大きな損失だった。 

[文法] 

The band we hired was the finest I had ever heard 

私達が雇ったバンドは私が聞いた中で最高だった(the finest I had heard) 

The world really missed something by not digging Black Benny on that bass drum before he was killed by a prostitute. 

世界は、ブラック・ベニーが一人の売春婦に殺される前にバスドラムに彼(の代わり)を見つけることができなかったことについて、本当に大きなものを失ってしまった。 

 

 

It was a real sad moment when the Onward Brass Band struck up the funeral march as Arthur Brown's body was being brought from the church to the grave yard. Everybody cried, including me. Black Benny beat the bass drum with a soft touch, and Babe Mathews put a handkerchief under his snare to deaden the tone. Nearer My God to Thee was played as the coffin was lowered into the grave.  

オンワードブラスバンドが葬送行進曲を演奏し始め、アーサー・ブラウンの棺が教会から墓地へと出発する時、悲しみは最高潮に達した。皆が泣き叫んだ。僕も泣き叫んだ。バスドラムのブラック・ベニーはソフトなビートを聞かせ、スネアドラムのベイブ・マシューはハンカチを裏面に添えてミュートをかけた。棺が墓穴の中に降ろされるとき、「主よ、汝の御下へ」が演奏された。 

[文法] 

as Arthur Brown's body was being brought from the church  

アーサー・ブラウンの遺体が教会から運ばれていた時に 

 

 

As pallbearers Cocaine Buddy, Little Head Lucas, Egg Head Papa, Harry Tennisen and myself wore the darkest clothes we had, blue suits for the most part. Later that same year Harry Tennisen was killed by a hustling gal of the honky-tonks called Sister Pop. Her pimp was named Pop and was well known as a good cotch player. Pop did not know anything about the affair until Sister Pop shot Harry in the brain with a big forty-five gun and killed him instantly. Later on Lucas and Cocaine Buddy died natural deaths of T.B.  

棺を運ぶ者として、コカイン・バディ、小顔のルーカス、卵顔のパパ、ハリー・テニスンン、そして僕は、皆自分の持っている一番暗い色の服、大概はブルーのスーツを着ていた。その後同じ年に、今度はハリー・テニスンがシスター・ポップという酒場の売春婦に殺された。彼女を担当していたポン引きはポップといって、とんでもないペテン師として悪名が轟いていた。シスター・ポップがM1911という大型拳銃でハリーの頭を撃ち抜いて即死させるまで、ポップは何も知らなかったとのこと。後を追うように亡くなってしまった。 

[文法] 

until Sister Pop shot Harry 

シスター・ポップがハリーを撃つまでずっと(until) 

 

 

The funerals in New Orleans are sad until the body is finally lowered into the grave and the Reverend says, "ashes to ashes and dust to dust." After the brother was six feet under ground the band would strike up one of those good old tunes like Didn't He Ramble, and all the people would leave their worries behind. Particularly when King Oliver blew that last chorus in high register.  

ニューオーリンズの葬儀は、遺体が墓穴に埋葬され、牧師のシメの一言「灰は灰に、塵は塵に」によって悲しみの時間が終わる。アーサーが埋葬されると、バンドは当時人気のあった「Didn't He Ramble」のような曲を演奏し始める。そして参列した人々は悲しみに別れを告げるのだ。特にキング・オリバーが曲の最後のコーラスで高い音域のフレーズを高らかに奏でるときは最高の瞬間だった。 

[文法] 

the band would strike up one of those good old tunes 

バンドは当時の人気曲の一つを演奏することになっていた(would) 

 

Once the band starts, everybody starts swaying from one side of the street to the other, especially those who drop in and follow the ones who have been to the funeral. These people are known as "the second line" and they may be anyone passing along the street who wants to hear the music. The spirit hits them and they follow along to see what's happening. Some follow only a few blocks, but others follow the band until the whole 

affair is over.  

バンドがパレードを始めると、皆が通りを蛇行し始める。中でも途中から人の流れに飛び入りで参加してくる人達がいる。彼らは「セカンドライン」と呼ばれている。音楽を聞きたくて道端にいて途中からついてゆくのだ。心に火がついて、パレードの次第を見届けようと追いかけてゆく。3、4つ向こうの角までという人達もいるが、他の人達はパレードが終わるまでずっとついてゆく。 

[文法] 

those who drop in and follow the ones who have been to the funeral 

途中から参加して葬式にずっと参加してきている人達の後をついて行く人達(who have been) 

 

Wakes are usually held when the body is laid out in the house or the funeral parlor. The family of the deceased usually serves a lot of coffee, cheese and crackers all night long so that the people who come to sing hymns over the corpse can eat and drink to their heart's delight. I used to go to a lot of wakes and lead off with a hymn. After everybody had joined in the chorus I would tiptoe on into the kitchen and load up on crackers, cheese and coffee. That meal always tasted specially good. Maybe it was because that meal was a freebie and didn't cost me anything but a song or I should say, a hymn.  

遺体が家、もしくは葬儀場に安置されると、いつもは通夜が行われる。遺族は通常弔問客にコーヒーやチーズ、クラッカーを振る舞い、故人に賛美歌を捧げにきた人達が十分に飲み食いできるようにした。当時僕は多くの通夜に足を運び、賛美歌の音頭取りをした。弔問客が全員合唱に加わったところを見計らって、僕は人目をはばかるように台所へ入り、クラッカーやチーズ、コーヒーを頂戴する。皆に振る舞われる食事はとても美味しかった。お金はかからないし、歌、いや賛美歌というべきか、を歌えばよかったから、うまさも一際だったのだと思う。 

 

There was one guy who went to every wake in town. It did not matter whose wake it was. In some way he would find out about it and get there, rain or shine, and lead off with a hymn. When I got old enough to play in the brass band with good old-timers like Joe Oliver, Roy Palmer, Sam Dutrey and his brother Honore, Oscar Celestin, Oak Gasper, Buddy Petit, Kid Ory and Mutt Carey and his brother Jack I began noticing this character more frequently. Once I saw him in church looking very sad and as if he was going to cry any minute. His clothes were not very good and his pants and coat did not match. What I admired about him was that he managed to look very present able. His clothes were well pressed and his shoes shined. Finally I found out the guy was called Sweet Child.  

通夜が町で行われるたびに顔を出す人が一人いた。誰の通夜にも顔を出した。どこからか情報を聞きつけて、晴れの日も雨の日もやってきて、賛美歌の音頭取りをする。僕はブラスバンドに参加できる歳になり、席を並べることになった往年の名手達が、ジョー・オリバー、ロイ・パルマー、サム・デュトレーと兄弟のオノレ、オスカー・セレスティン、オーク・ガスパー、バディ・プティ、キッド・オリー、マット・ケリーとその兄弟のジャックといった面々だった。この頃からさらに、「お通夜の常連さん」も度々見かけるようになった。ある時僕が彼を教会で見かけたときは、悲しい表情をして、今にも泣き出すのでは、という風に見えた。彼の身なりはあまり良いとは言えず、上着とズボンもバラバラだった。とはいえ、彼が何とか見苦しくなくしようと頑張っているのには、僕も感心した。アイロンをしっかりと掛け、靴もきれいに磨いてあった。後になってやっとわかったことだが、その男性はスウィート・チャイルド(可愛い僕ちゃん)と呼ばれていた。 

[文法] 

Once I saw him in church looking very sad and as if he was going to cry any minute 

一度私は彼が教会に居て悲しそうに見えて、まるで彼がいつでも泣き出しそうであった 

(as if he was ) 

 

 

For some time funerals gave me the only chance I had to blow my cornet. The war had started, and all the dance halls and theaters in New Orleans had been closed down. A draft law had been passed and everybody had to work or fight, I was perfectly willing to go into the Army, but they were only drafting from the age of twenty-one to twenty-five and I was only seven teen. I tried to get into the Navy, but they checked up on my birth certificate and threw me out. I kept up my hope and at one enlistment office a soldier told me to come back in a year. He said that if the war was still going on I could capture the Kaiser and win a great, big prize. "Wouldn't that be swell” I thought. "Capture the Kaiser and win the war." Believe me, I lived to see that day.  

しばらくの間、僕がコルネットを吹くのは葬式だけになった。第一次大戦が始まっていて、ニューオーリンズの全てのダンスホールと劇場が閉鎖されていた。徴用法が可決され、全ての人が国内で仕事に従事するか、もしくは兵役に就かねばならなかった。僕は当然陸軍を希望したが、21歳~25歳までが対象で、僕はまだ17歳だった。そこで海軍に入り込んでやろうと思ったが、年齢ではじかれてしまった。僕はある入隊事務所に望みをつなぎ、そこにいた兵隊さんが一年経ったらまた来るよう言ってくれた。彼が言うには、もし戦争が続いていたなら、敵国ドイツで一番偉い人を捕まえたら大いに表彰されるだろうとのことだった。「すごいや、絶対そいつを捕まえて戦争に勝つんだ」信じられないかもしれないが、僕は本気だった。 

[解説] 

the Kaiser:ドイツ皇帝 

 

Since I did not have a chance to play my cornet, I did odd jobs of all kinds. For a time I worked unloading the banana boats until a big rat jumped out of a bunch I was carrying to the checker. I dropped that bunch and started to run. The checker hollered at me to come back and get my time, but I didn't stop running until I got home. Since then bananas have terrified me. I would not eat one if I was starving. Yet I can remember how I used to love them. I could eat a whole small ripe bunch all by myself when the checker could not see me.  

コルネットを吹く機会が無くなってしまったので、僕はありとあらゆる雑用の仕事に手を出した。バナナの運搬船から積荷を下ろす仕事をしていた時のことだった。ある時僕はバナナを一房担いで点検係へと運んでいたら、大きなネズミがバナナの房の中から飛び出した。僕はそのバナナの房を放り出すと、一目散に駆け出した。点検係が戻ってチェックを受けろと叫んだが、僕はそのまま家まで逃げ帰るしかできなかった。以来、僕はバナナがこわい。どんなにお腹が空いていても絶対に食べたくない。でも昔はバナナは大好きだったのだ。よく点検係の目を盗んで、熟した一房丸ごと平らげたこともあったくらいだ。 

[文法] 

I would not eat one if I was starving 

もし私が飢えていても一つも食べることはしない(I would not eat if I was) 

 

Every time things went bad with me I had the coal cart to fall back on, thanks to my good stepfather Gabe. I sure did like him, and I used to tease Mayann about it. 

'"Mama, you know one thing?" I would say. "Papa Gabe is the best step-pa I've ever had. He is the best out of the whole lot of them."  

Mayann would kind of chuckle and say:  

"Aw, go on, you Fatty O'Butler." 

働き口に困るようになるたびに、僕は石炭の仕事をした。これも義父のゲイブのおかげだった。僕は彼が好きだった。それでよくそのことでメイアンを冷やかしたものだった。 

「お母さん、あのさ、ゲイブ父さんって一番いいお父さんだよね。僕はそう思っている。」 

するとメイアンは、くすぐったそうに微笑むとこう言った。 

「うんうん、もっと言って、ファッティ・オーバトラー君」 

 

That was the time when the moving picture actor Fatty Arbuckle was in his prime and very popular in New Orleans. Mayann never did get his name right. It sounded so good to me when she called me Fatty O'Butler that I never told her different.  

当時映画俳優のファッティ・アーバックルが全盛期で、ニューオーリンズでも大変な人気だった。メイアンは彼の名前を全然正しく言えず、僕をいつも「ファッティ・オーバトラー」と呼んでくれていたのだが、僕も彼女に正しい言い方を言おうとはしなかった。 

 

I would stay at the coal yard with father Gabe until I thought I had found something better, that is something that was easier. It was hard work shoveling coal and sitting behind my mule all day long, and I used to get awful pains in my back. So any time I could find a hustle that was just a little lighter, I would run to it like a man being chased.  

割のいい仕事が見つかるまで、いつもゲイブ父さんと石炭の仕事をしてしのいだ。それが比較的やりやすいしのぎ方だったからだ。石炭をシャベルで積み下ろしをし、一日中ラバの荷馬車に乗っているのは重労働で、おかげでひどい腰痛に苦しんだものだった。だから比較的罪のないズルの方法が見つかれば、罪悪感に苛まれながらもそれに飛びついた。 

[文法] 

It was hard work shoveling coal and sitting behind my mule all day long 

石炭をシャベルで掻いてラバの荷馬車の後ろに座るのはきつい仕事だった(It was ) 

 

The job I took with Morris Karnoffsky was easier, and I stayed with him a long time. His wagon went through the red-light district, or Storyville, selling stone coal at a nickel a bucket. Stone coal was what they called hard coal. One of the reasons I kept the job with Morris Karnoffsky was that it gave me a chance to go through Storyville in short pants. Since I was working with a man, the cops did not bother me. Otherwise they would have tanned my hide if they had caught me rambling around that district. They were very strict with us youngsters and I don't blame them. The temptation was great and weakminded kids could have sure messed things up.  

[訳] 

モリス・カルノフスキーとの仕事は割と楽だった。彼とは長い期間ペアを組んだ。彼の荷馬車は売春宿が集まる地区であるストーリーヴィルを通り、無煙炭をバケツ一杯5セントで売り歩いた。無煙炭はハードコールとも言われた。モリス・カルノフスキーと一緒に仕事をしたのには理由があった。そのうちの一つは、彼と一緒ならストーリーヴィルを未成年の格好をして行き来する事ができたからだ。大人の男性と一緒なら、警官も文句は言わない。そうでなければ、その地区を僕なんかがウロウロしていたら、彼らは僕を捕まえて厳しい罰を与える。警察は子供達には厳しくあたった。僕もそれには異議はなかった。その地区の誘惑がすごくて、「ガキ共」はコロッとひっかかり、面倒を起こすのが常だった。 

[文法] 

weakminded kids could have sure messed things up 

誘惑に弱い子供達は間違いなく面倒を起こす可能性があった(could have messed) 

 

 

As for me I was pretty wise to things. I had been brought up around the honky-tonks on Liberty and Perdido where life was just about the same as it was in Storyville except that the chippies were cheaper. The gals in my neighborhood did not stand in cribs wearing their fine silk lingerie as they did in Storyville. They wore the silk lingerie just the same, but under their regular clothes. Our hustlers sat on their steps and called to the "Johns" as they passed by. They had to keep an eye on the cops all the time, because they weren't allowed to call the tricks like the girls in Storyville. That was strictly a business center. Music, food and everything else was good there.  

[訳] 

僕は物事を賢く見据えることができたと思っている。僕が生まれ育ったのは、売春宿がひしめくリバティー通りとパーディド通り、そこはストーリーヴィルと街の様子は全く一緒だった。一つ違っていたのは、女の子と遊ぶ値段が安かったことだ。僕の近所の売春婦達が売春宿にいるときは、シルクの下着姿では居なかった。これもストーリーヴィルとの 

違いの一つだ。勿論、下着は着ているが、その上に普通の服を着ているのである。ポン引き達が外の階段のところに腰を掛け、「お客さん」が通るたびに呼び込みをかける。彼らは常に警官に注意を払わねばならない。というのも、ストーリーヴィルのように女の子達が男を誘うことは禁止されているからだ。そこは堅気の商売をする町であり、音楽でも飲食でも、とにかく売春行為以外なら大丈夫、というわけである。 

[文法] 

I had been brought up around the honky-tonks on Liberty and Perdido  

私は以前はリバティー通りとパーディド通りにある売春宿の周りで育った(had been ) 

 

All of the cribs had a small fireplace. When our wagon passed by, the girls would holler out to Morris and tell him to have his boy bring in some coal. I would bring them whatever they ordered, and they would generally ask me to start a fire for them or put some coal on the fire that was already burning. While I was fixing the fire I couldn't help stealing a look at them, which always sent me into a cold sweat. I did not dare say anything, but I had eyes, and very good ones at the time, and I used them. It seemed to me that some of the beautiful young women I saw standing in those doorways should have been home with their parents.  

どこの売春宿にも暖炉があった。僕達の荷馬車が通ると、宿にいる女の子達はモリスに声をかけ、助手の坊や(僕)に石炭を運ばせるよう言うのである。僕は彼女達がいう分量を運び込み、大抵は、火をおこすか、すでに燃え盛っている火に石炭をくべるかのどちらかをする。火をおこしている間は彼女達の方をチラ見したくなってしまうのだが、いつも冷や汗をかいていた。敢えて何も言いはしないが、僕の目は結構上玉を良く捉えた。こういった戸口に立っている女の子達の中には、ここへ来る前は二親がちゃんと揃って暮らしていた子もいるはずだと、僕は思っていた。 

[文法] 

I couldn't help stealing a look at them, which always sent me into a cold sweat 

僕は彼女達のほうを盗み見せずには居られなかったが、その御蔭で悪い汗をかいた 

(I couldn't help stealing / , which) 

 

What I appreciated most about being able to go into Storyville without being bothered by the cops, was Pete Lala's cabaret where Joe Oliver had his band and where he was blowing up a storm on his cornet. No body could touch him. Harry Zeno, the best known drummer in New Orleans, was playing with him at the time. What I admired most about Zeno was that no matter how hard he played the sporting racket he never let it interfere with his profession. And that's some thing the modern day musician has to learn. Nothing ever came between Harry Zeno and his drums.  

警官達に邪魔されずにストーリーヴィルに入って行ける最大の有り難みは、ピート・ララのキャバレーに行けることだ。そこにジョー・オリバーのバンドがいて、訪れる客を彼のコルネットが熱狂させている。彼こそNo.1だった。彼と当時一緒にやっていたのが、ニューオーリンズで最も有名なドラム奏者のハリー・ゼノだ。ゼノのスゴさは、僕が思うに、どんなに大音響を鳴らしても、決して他のメンバーの邪魔をしないことだ。そしてこのことを、今時(1952年)のミュージシャン達は学ぶべきである。ハリー・ゼノのドラムを乱すことのできるものは、何一つなかった。 

[文法] 

no matter how hard he played the sporting racket he never let it interfere with his profession 

どんなに強力に大音量を鳴らしても、彼はその音が彼の仲間の邪魔をするようなことは決してさせなかった 

(no matter how / let it interfere) 

 

There were other members of Joe Oliver's band whose names have become legendary in music. The world will never be able to replace them, and I say that from the bottom of my heart. These musicians were Buddy Christian, guitar (he doubled on piano also); Zue Robertson, trombone; Jimmy Noone, clari net; Bob Lyons, bass violin; and last but not least Joe Oliver on the cornet. That was the hottest jazz band ever heard in New Orleans between the years 1910 and 1917. 

[訳] 

他にもジョー・オリバーのバンドには音楽史にその名を残すレジェンド達がいる。今後も彼らに匹敵するプレーヤーは出てこないだろうと、僕は心からそう思っている。そのレジェンド達とは、ギターのバディ・クリスチャン(ピアノ兼任)、トロンボーンのズー・ロバートソン、クラリネットのジミー・ヌーン、ベースのボブ・ライオンズ。そして最後に、最高の人、コルネットのジョー・オリバー。彼らのジャズバンドは、1910年~1917年のニューオーリンズで最も熱い演奏を聞かせたのである。 

 

Harry Zeno died in the early part of 1917 and his funeral was the largest ever held for any musician. Sweet Child, by the way, was at this funeral too, singing away as though he was a member of Zeno's lodge. The Onward Brass Band put him away with those fine, soothing funeral marches.  

ハリー・ゼノが亡くなったのは1917年の初めだった。ミュージシャンのための葬儀としては最大規模だった。ところでその葬儀には、スウィート・チャイルド(可愛い僕ちゃん)も来ていて、まるで彼もゼノのファンの一人のような顔をして歌っていた。オンワードブラスバンドが彼の葬送行進のために、珠玉の演奏をして彼を送った。 

 

Not long after Zeno died talk started about closing down Storyville. Some sailors on leave got mixed up in a fight and two of them were killed. The Navy started a war on Storyville, and even as a boy I could see that the end was near. The police began to raid all the houses and cabarets. All the pimps and gamblers who hung around a place called Twenty-Five while their chicks were working were locked up.  

ゼノが亡くなって間もなく、ストーリーヴィルが閉鎖されるとの噂が広がり始めた。休暇中の水兵達が喧嘩に巻き込まれ、うち2名が殺害された。海軍がストーリーヴィルに戦争をふっかけたのだ。そして子供だった僕にさえ、その戦争の決着は早くことは分かっていた。警察がすべての家屋ならびにキャバレーにガサ入れを始めた。売春婦達を抱え働かせていたポン引き達や賭博師達は、通称「25」と呼ばれた地域にたむろしていたのだが、彼らの身柄は拘束された。 

[文法] 

All the pimps and gamblers who hung around a place called Twenty-Five 

25と呼ばれた場所を徘徊していた全てのポン引き達と賭博師達(a place called) 

 

It sure was a sad scene to watch the law run all those people out of Storyville. They reminded me of a gang of refugees. Some of them had spent the best part of their lives there. Others had never known any other kind of life. I have never seen such weeping and carrying-on. Most of the pimps had to go to work or go to jail, except a privileged few.  

こういった人々がストーリーヴィルから法律によって排除されてゆくの見ることは、本当に悲しい光景だった。彼らの姿は、避難民となった人々を思い起こさせる。彼らの中には、人生の最盛期をこの街で過ごした者がいる。ここ以外での暮らしの有り様を全く知らない者がいる。こんなにも皆が悲しみに涙し、大騒ぎとなったことを僕は見たことがない。売春婦達の大半が、堅気の仕事に変えたり、中には投獄される者もいた。逃れることができたのは、ほんの一握りの上の方の子達だけだった。 

[文法] 

It sure was a sad scene to watch the law run all those people out of Storyville 

法律がストーリーヴィルからこれら人々を排除するのを見るのは実に悲しい光景だった 

(It was to watch 

 

A new generation was about to take over in Storyville. My little crowd had begun to look forward to other kicks, like our jazz band, our quartet and other musical activities. 

新しい世代がストーリーヴィルを席巻しようとしていた。僕達の小さな集団は、既に行動を起こしていた。ジャズバンドや男声カルテットなど様々な音楽活動だ。 

[文法] 

My little crowd had begun to look forward to other kicks 

私の小さな集団は既に他の行動を見据え始めていていた(had begun) 

 

Joe Lindsey and I formed a little orchestra. Joe was a very good drummer, and Morris French was a good man on the trombone. He was a little shy at first, but we soon helped him to get over that. Another shy lad was Louis Prevost who played the clarinet, but how he could play once he got started! We did not use a piano in those days. There were only six pieces: cornet, clarinet, trombone, drums, bass violin and guitar, and when those six kids started to swing, you would swear it was Ory and Oliver's jazz band.  

ジョー・リンゼイと僕は小さな楽団を結成した。ジョーはドラムが上手だったし、モリス・フレンチはトロンボーンの名人だった。モリスは初め少々臆していたが、ジョーと二人で彼が打ち解けるよう働きかけた。臆していたのはもう一人いた。クラリネットのルイ・プレヴォだ。最も彼は、一旦楽器を吹き始めたら、それは大したものだった。当時バンドというものピアニストを置かなかった。6人だけの楽器編成だった。コルネットクラリネットトロンボーン、ドラムス、ベース、そしてギター。そしてこの6人がイカしたスウィングを奏で始めれば、皆「オリー&オリバーズバンドだ」と口々に叫んだものだった。 

 

Kid Ory and Joe Oliver got together and made one of the hottest jazz bands that ever hit New Orleans. They often played in a tail gate wagon to advertise a ball or other entertainments. When they found themselves on a street corner next to another band in an other wagon, Joe and Kid Ory would shoot the works. They would give with all that good mad music they had under their belts and the crowd would go wild. When the other band decided it was best to cut the competition and start out for another corner, Kid Ory played a little tune on his trombone that made the crowd go wild again. But this time they were wild with laughter. If you ever run into Kid Ory, maybe he will tell you the name of that tune. I don't dare write it here. It was a cute little tune to celebrate the defeat of the enemy. I thought it screamingly funny and I think you would too.  

キッド・オリーとジョー・オリバーは、ニューオーリンズ史上最高にアツいバンドを結成した。彼らはよく、テールゲートワゴン(宣伝馬車)に乗って、舞踏会やその他娯楽の催し物の宣伝演奏を行った。ジョーとキッド・オリーは街角で他のワゴンと遭遇すると、自分たちの演奏をぶつけてくる。既に彼らの体の一部というべき、イカしたアツい曲を全て演奏すると、通りに集まった人達は熱狂しだす。相手のワゴンは、自分達では敵わないと見ると方向を変える。キッド・オリーはトロンボーンで一節吹くと、人々はまた熱狂する。ただし、この時は笑いが起こる。「一節」の曲名は、キッド・オリーに訊けば教えてくれるだろう。ここではわざわざそれは書かない。相手の負けに対し、健闘を称える一節だ。僕はこの一節はとても可笑しいと思うし、皆さんもそう思うのではないだろうか。 

[文法] 

it was best to cut the competition and start out for another corner 

競争を打ち切って別の街角へ向かったほうがましだった(it was best to cut) 

 

Kid knew how much Joe Oliver cared for me. He also knew that, great as he was, Joe Oliver would never do anything that would make me look small in the eyes of the public. Oftentimes when our band was on the street advertising a lawn party or some other entertainment, our tail wagon would run into the Ory-Oliver's band. When this happened Joe had told me to stand up so that he would be sure to see me and not do any carving. After he saw me he would stand up in his wagon, play a few short pieces and set out in another direction.  

キッドは、相棒のジョー・オリバーが僕のことを可愛がってくれていることを知っていた。またキッドは素晴らしいことに、ジョー・オリバーは公衆の面前で僕に恥をかかせるようなことは決してしないことも知っていた。僕達のワゴンがガーデンパーティーやなんかの娯楽イベントの宣伝をしていると、オリー&オリバーバンドのワゴンと出くわす、などということが何度もあった。こういう時のために、ジョーは前もって僕に言い含めてくれていたことがあった。こんな時は、必ず馬車の上で立ち上がれ、僕の姿を確認すれば悪いようにはしない、ジョーのワゴンは2つ3つ短い曲を演奏して道を譲ってやる、というのだ。 

[文法] 

Joe Oliver would never do anything that would make me look small 

ジョー・オリバーは僕のメンツを潰すようなことは決してしない(make me look) 

 

One day when we were advertising for a ball we ran into Oliver and his band. I was not feeling very well that day and I forgot to stand up. What a licking those guys gave us. Sure enough when our wagon started to leave, Kid Ory started to play that get-away tune at us. The crowd went mad. We felt terrible about it, but we took it like good sports because there was not any other band that could do that to us. We youngsters were the closest rivals the Ory band had.  

ある日のこと、僕達のワゴンが、ある舞踏会の宣伝をしていたとき、オリバーのワゴンに出くわした。その日僕は体調があまり良くなく、立ち上がるのを忘れてしまった。そうしたら彼らは僕達に大目玉を食らわせてきた。当然、僕達はその場を退散し始めた。キッド・オリーは「出ていけ」の曲を僕達にぶつけた。通りの人々は大喜びだ。僕達は血の気が引く思いがした。といっても僕達は、スポーツで勝負しているような気分でいたのだ。なぜなら、オリバーのワゴン以外で、僕達にこんな仕打ちのできるワゴンは、他に居やしないからだ。僕達若造が、オリーのバンドに実力で一番近くに居たからだ。 

[文法] 

there was not any other band that could do that to us 

それを私達にやれるバンドは他になかった(not any other band) 

 

I saw Joe Oliver the night of the day he had cut in on us. 

"Why in hell,” he said before I could open my mouth, "didn't you stand up?"  

"Papa Joe, it was all my fault. I promise I won't ever do that again."  

We laughed it all off, and Joe brought me a bottle of beer. This was a feather in my cap because Papa Joe was a safe man, and he did not waste a lot of money buying anybody drinks. But for me he would do anything he thought would make me happy.  

ジョー・オリバーのワゴンに大目玉を食らった日の夜、僕は彼と会った。 

僕がなにか言おうとする前に、彼は言った「なんでまた立ち上がらなかったんだ、コラ」 

「パパジョー、全部僕が悪いんです。もう絶対しないって約束します。」 

その日のことは笑って水に流された。ジョーは僕にビールをごちそうしてくれた。僕にとってはこの上ない名誉なことだった。なぜならパパジョーは信用の置ける人であり、他人に大枚はたいて飲み物をごちそうするような金の無駄遣いはしない人だったからだ。なのに僕に対しては、僕が喜ぶだろうと思うことを、彼は何でもしてくれた。 

[文法] 

he did not waste a lot of money buying anybody drinks 

彼は他人に飲み物を買ってやるのに大金をムダにしなかった(buying) 

 

At that time I did not know the other great musicians such as Jelly Roll Morton, Freddy Keppard, Jimmy Powlow, Bab Frank, Bill Johnson, Sugar Johnny, Tony Jackson, George Fields and Eddy Atkins. All of them had left New Orleans long before the red-light district was closed by the Navy and the law. Of course I met most of them in later years, but Papa Joe Oliver, God bless him, was my man. I often did errands for Stella Oliver, his wife, and Joe would give me lessons for my pay. I could not have asked for anything I wanted more. It was my ambition to play as he did. I still think that if it had not been for Joe Oliver jazz would not be what it is today. He was a creator in his own right.  

[訳] 

パパジョー以外の大物達とは、当時僕は面識がなかった。例えば、ジェリー・ロール・モートン、フレディ・ケッパード、ジミー・パウロウ、ボブ・フランク、ビル・ジョンソン、シュガー・ジョニー、トニー・ジャクソン、ジョージ・フィールズ、それからエディ・アトキンスだ。彼らは全員、赤線地帯が海軍と法律のせいで閉鎖されてしまうずっと前に、この町から居なくなってしまっていたのだ。勿論、後になって彼らの大半とは顔を合わせることになるのだが、当時の僕にはパパジョーこそがヒーローだった。僕はちょくちょく奥さんのステラ・オリバーのお使いを引き受け、そのご褒美にジョーが僕にレッスンをしてくれる。僕にとってはこれ以上無いことだった。何としても彼みたいに吹けるようになりたかった。もしジョー・オリバーがいなかったら、ジャズの歴史は変わっていただろうと僕は今でも思っている。彼は神に選ばれし天才だったのだ(直訳:彼は誰にも教わらずにモノを創造できる人間だった)。 

[文法] 

I could not have asked for anything I wanted more 

私はわたしが望んでいたもっと多くのものをお願いすることができたはずだった 

(could have asked) 

 

Mrs. Oliver also became attached to me, and treated me as if I were her own son. She had a little girl by her first marriage named Ruby, whom I knew when she was just a little shaver. She is married now and has a daughter who will be married soon.  

One of the nicest things Joe Oliver did for me when I was a youngster was to give me a beat-up old cornet of his which he had blown for years. I prized that horn and guarded it with my life. I blew on it for a long, long time before I was fortunate enough to get another one.  

奥さんも僕をかわいがってくれた、まるで自分の息子のように扱ってくれた。彼女には前夫との間の娘さんがいて、名前をルビーといった。当時はうんと小さかった。今では結婚していて(1954年)、その娘さんは間もなくお嫁に行く予定だ。 

ジョー・オリバーが僕の少年時代にあれこれしてくれたことの中で、一番嬉しかったのは、彼が何年も使い込み年季の入ったコルネットを譲ってくれたことだった。僕は大感激で、生涯大事にしている。自分のお金で楽器が買えるようになるまで、僕は譲ってもらったコルネットをずっと吹いていた。 

[文法] 

a beat-up old cornet of his which he had blown for years 

彼が何年も吹いていたボロボロの古いコルネット 

 

Cornets were much cheaper then than they are today, but at that they cost sixty-five dollars. You had to be a big shot musician making plenty of money to pay that price for a horn. I remember how such first rate musicians as Hamp Benson, Kid Ory, Zoo French, George Brashere, Joe Petit and lots of other fellows I played with beamed all over when they got new horns. They acted just as though they had received a brand new Cadillac.  

当時コルネットは、今よりずっと手頃な値段だった。といっても65ドルした。楽器一台買うのに見合うお金を稼ぐには、一流の腕が必要で、当時の面々で言えば、ハンプ・ベンソン、キッド・オリー、ズー・フレンチ、ジョージ・ブラッシャー、ジョー・プティ、他にも沢山いるが、彼らと一緒に演奏していた頃、新しい楽器を買ったと言ってはニコニコしていたのをよく覚えている。それこそ、キャデラックの新車でも買ったかのような喜びようだった。 

[文法] 

Cornets were much cheaper then than they are today 

コルネットは今日よりもずっと安かった(than they are today) 

 

I got my first brand new cornet on the installment plan with "a little bit down" and a "little bit now and then." Whenever my collector would catch up with me and start talking about a "little bit now" I would tell him:  

"I'll give you-all a little bit then, but I'm damned if I can give you-all a little bit now."  

僕が初めて新品のコルネット買った時は、月賦で、それも「払えるときに払えるだけ」という約束だった。だから借金取りがやって来て「払えるときに」と言い出すと、僕はこう答えたものだった。 

「払えるだけ、ならいいよ。払えるときに、なんてやっていたら、オケラになっちまう」 

[日本語訳解説] 

オケラになる:古典落語などに見られる「お金がなくなる」の洒落た言い回し。 

本文中の英語は現在では使われていない表現が多く、同時に、サッチモは優れた文筆家であったこともあり、このような訳語を当てました。 

 

Cornet players used to pawn their instruments when there was a lull in funerals, parades, dances, gigs and picnics. Several times I went to the pawnshop and picked up some loot on my horn. Once it was to play cotch and be around the good old hustlers and gamblers. 

当時のコルネット吹き達は、葬式やパレード、ダンスパーティー、ステージ演奏、ピクニックへの同行演奏といった仕事がないときは、自分の楽器を質屋に預けたものだった。僕も楽器を質に入れ、なおかつ、質草を取り戻す前に、更にお金を借りるようなことをしていた。質屋に「これはもっと価値のあるものなんだ」とカマをかけるのだが、古き良き時代のペテン師や賭博師のやり口だったのである。 

[文法] 

to play cotchカマをかける(ジャマイカ英語のスラング 

 

I can never stop loving Joe Oliver. He was always ready to come to my rescue when I needed someone to tell me about life and its little intricate things, and help me out of difficult situations. That is what happened when I met a gal named Irene, who had just arrived from Memphis, Tennessee, and did not know a soul in New Orleans. She got mixed up with a gambler in my neighborhood named Cheeky Black who gave her a real hard time. She used to come into a honky-tonk where I was playing with a three piece combo. I played the cornet; Boogus, the piano; and Sonny Garbie, the drums. After their night's work was over, all the hustling gals used to come into the joint around four or five o'clock in the morning. They would ask us to beat out those fine blues for them and buy us drinks, cigarettes, or anything we wanted.  

僕はジョー・オリバーのことを嫌いになることは、決して無いだろう。人生のこと、そしてその上で何かと面倒なこと、そういったことを話す相手がほしい、解決する手助けがほしい、そう思った時はいつでも彼は僕のところへ駆けつけて助けてくれた。アイリーンという名前の女の子のときもそうだった。僕が出会った彼女は、テネシー州メンフィスから出てきたばかりで、ここニューオーリンズには顔見知りが誰一人居なかった。彼女が関わってしまった賭博師は、僕の近所の男で、名前をチーキー・ブラックといった。こいつが彼女を心底苦しめたのだ。彼女が出入りしていた売春宿は、僕が3人編成のコンボを演奏していたところだった。僕がコルネット、ブーガスがピアノ、そしてソニー・ガービーがドラムスである。女の子たちは全員、夜のお仕事を終えると、早朝4時か5時あたりに店に戻ってくる。彼女達は僕達にイカした曲を何曲か弾くよう言って、僕達が演奏すると、飲み物でもタバコでも、なんでも奢ってくれた。 

[文法] 

a gal named Irene, who had just arrived from Memphis, Tennessee 

アイリーンという名前の少女で、テネシー州メンフィスから来たばかりの子(named / who had just arrived) 

 

 

I noticed that everyone was having a good time except Irene. One morning during an intermission I went over to talk to her and she told me her whole story. Cheeky Black had taken every nickel she had earned and she had not eaten for two days. She was as raggedy as a bowl of slaw. That is where I came in with my soft heart. I was making a dollar and twentyfive cents a night. That was a big salary in those days ― if I got it; some nights they paid us, and some nights they didn't. Anyway I gave Irene most of my salary until she could get on her feet.  

皆が楽しそうにしている中、アイリーンだけが浮かない様子である。ある朝、演奏が休憩になると、僕は彼女に話しかけようと歩み寄った。彼女は全て話してくれた。チーキー・ブラックは彼女が稼ぐたびに全部それを取り上げてしまい、もう2日間何も食べてないという。彼女はしなびたコールスローサラダのようにヨレヨレだ。僕は放っておけなくなった。僕の一晩の稼ぎは、貰える場合は1ドル25セントだったが、当時としてはかなりいい方である。貰える場合とそうでない場合があるが、いずれにせよ、彼女が元気を取り戻すまで、僕は稼げた時は大半を彼女に分けてやった。 

[文法] 

as raggedly as a bowl of slaw 

お皿一杯のコールスローサラダのようにヨレヨレの(慣用句) 

 

That went on until she and Cheeky Black came to the parting of the ways. There was only one thing Irene could do: take refuge under my wing. I had not had any experience with women, and she taught me all I know.  

チーキー・ブラックと彼女が袂を分かつまで、僕はこれを続けた。アイリーンとしては僕の庇護のもとに入るしかなかったのである。僕にはそれまで女性との経験は全くなかったが、アイリーンがそれを教えてくれた。 

 

We fell deeply in love. My mother did not know this at first. When she did find out, being the great little trouper she was, she made no objections. She felt that I was old enough to live my own life and to think for myself. Irene and I lived together as man and wife. Then one fine day she was taken deathly sick. As she had been very much weakened by the dissipated life she had led her body could not resist the sickness that attacked her. Poor girl! She was twenty-one, and I was just turning seventeen. I was at a loss as to what to do for her.  

僕達は深く愛し合うようになった。メイアンは初めこのことに気づいていなかった。彼女は頼りがいのある人で、気づいたときには別に反対はしなかった。息子の僕はもう大人なんだから、自分の人生自分で考えたらいい、という考えだったのだ。アイリーンと僕は男女の関係となって生活を共にした。そんなある日、彼女は重篤な病気にかかってしまう。それまでの無理な生活で酷く衰弱し、体が病気に太刀打ちできなくなってしまっていた。気の毒な彼女。彼女は21歳、僕は17歳を回ったばかりだった。僕は彼女に何もしてやれないのである。 

[文法] 

being a great little trouper she was 

彼女はちょっとした頼りがいのある人だったので(being) 

 

The worst was when she began to suffer from stomach trouble. Every night she groaned so terribly that she was nearly driving me crazy. I was desperate when I met my fairy godfather, Joe Oliver. I ran into him when I was on my way to Poydras Market to get some fish heads to make a cubic yon for Irene the way Mayann had taught me how to cook it. Papa Joe was on his way to play for a funeral.  

悪いことに彼女は胃を悪くしてしまう。毎晩激しく苦しみ、僕は胸が張り裂けそうだった。ある時、いつも頼りにしているジョー・オリバーの顔を見て、すがるような思いになった。その日僕は、アイリーンにメイアン直伝のコートブイヨンを作ろうと、魚の頭を買いにポイドラス市場へ行くところだった。パパジョーは葬式の演奏に向かうところだった。 

[文法] 

the way Mayann had taught me how to cook 

メイアンが私にどのように作ったらいいか教えた方法(the way Mayann had taught) 

 

 

"Hello, kid. What's cooking?" he asked.  

"Nothing," I said sadly.  

Then I told him about Irene's sickness and how much I loved her.  

"You need money for a doctor? Is that it?" he said immediately. "Go down and take my place at Pete Lala's for two nights."  

彼は訊ねた「やあ、ボウズ。ごちそうの買い出しか?」 

僕は浮かない顔で答えた「そんな大したものじゃないっすよ」。 

そして僕は、アイリーンの病気のことと、彼女に対する僕の気持ちを話した。 

彼はすぐさま答えた「だったら、医者に見せる金が要るだろう。儂の代わりに、ピート・ララの店で二晩吹いてこい」。 

 

 

He was making top money down there a dollar and a half a night. In two nights I would make enough money to engage a very good doctor and get Irene's stomach straightened out. I was certainly glad to make the money I needed so much, and I was also glad to have a chance to blow my cornet again. It had been some time since I had used it. 

彼はその店では1.5ドルという一番高いギャラを貰っていた。その二晩で、僕は十分稼いで、良い医者にアイリーンの胃の具合を診てもらえることになった。どうしての必要なお金だったので、心から感謝した。そしてまたコルネットを吹くチャンスができたことも本当に嬉しかった。このところ以前のように吹く機会がなかったところだったのだ。 

[文法] 

I would make enough money to engage a very good doctor 

私はとても良い医者に診てもらう十分なお金を稼げることになった(would) 

 

"Papa Joe," I said, "I appreciate your kindness, but I do not think I am capable of taking your place.”  

Joe thought for a moment and then he said:  

"Aw, go'wan and play in my place. If Pete Lala says anything to you tell him I sent ya."  

「パパジョー、お心遣いは嬉しいんですが、僕なんかに務まるでしょうか」僕は言った。 

ジョーはしばらく考えてから言った。 

「いいから、行って儂の代わりに吹いてこい。ピート・ララが何か言ったら、儂に言われて来たと答えればいい。」 

[文法] 

go'wan = go on 

 

As bad as I actually needed the money I was scared to death. Joe was such a powerful figure in the district that Pete Lala was not going to accept a nobody in his place. I could imagine him telling me so in these very words.  

When I went there the next night, out of the corner of my eye I could see Pete coming before I had even opened my cornet case. I dumbed up and took my place on the bandstand.  

喉から手が出るほど欲しかったお金だ。ジョーはこのあたりでは重鎮で、ピート・ララは彼の代役など誰も認めないだろう。僕はピート・ララがそっくりそう言ってくるだろうと思っていた。 

次の晩僕は店を訪れた。楽器ケースをまだ開けないうちに、ピートが僕の方に向かってくるのが目に入った。僕は楽器ケースを置くとステージ上で立ち尽くした。 

[文法] 

I could imagine him telling me so in these very words 

私は彼がその言葉そのまま私に言うところを想像した(in these very words) 

 

"Where's Joe?" Pete asked.  

"He sent me to work in his place," I answered nervously.  

To my surprise Pete Lala let me play that night. However, every five minutes he would drag his club foot up to the bandstand in the very back of the cabaret.  

"Boy," he would say, "put that bute in your horn."  

I could not figure what on earth he was talking about until the end of the evening when I realized he meant to keep the mute in. When the night was over he told me that I did not need to come back.  

「ジョーはどうした?」ピートが訊ねた。 

僕はビクビクしながら答えた「僕に、代わりにここに来るよう言われまして・・・」 

驚いたことに、ピート・ララはその晩僕に、彼のキャバレーの舞台を任せてくれた。ところが、5分おきに店の一番うしろにいるバンドのところへやってきてはこう言うのだ。 

「ボウズ、ビュートをラッパにハメねぇか!」 

何を言っているのか僕にはわからなかったのだが、その晩の演奏が終わる頃やっと気づいた。ミュートをつけっぱなしにしろ、と言いたかったのだ。その晩の演奏が終わると、彼は僕にもう来なくていいと言った。 

[文法] 

Pete Lala let me play that night 

ピート・ララはその晩私に演奏させてくれた(let me play) 

 

I told Papa Joe what had happened and he paid me for the two nights anyway. He knew how much I needed the money, and besides that was the way he acted with someone he really liked.  

Joe quit Pete Lala's when the law began to close down Storyville on Saturday nights, the best night in the week. While he was looking for new fields he came to see Irene and me, and we cooked a big pot of good gumbo for him. Irene had gotten well, and we were happy again.  

[訳] 

僕はパパジョーにその晩のことを話した。彼はいずれにせよ、ということで2晩分の手当を渡してくれた。彼は僕がそのお金を本当に必要としていたことを分かってくれていたし、それに彼は気に入った人間にはいつもそんな風にしてくれていたのだ。 

ストーリーヴィルの歓楽街に対し土曜の夜間営業を法律が禁止してから後、ジョーはピート・ララの店を辞めた。土曜の夜といえば、そういう街にとっては書き入れ時だったのだ。次の演奏の場を探す間、彼はアイリーンと僕に会いに来てくれた。彼女と2人でガンボ(オクラのスープ)を振る舞った。アイリーンはすっかり体調を回復し、僕達にはまた幸せな時間が戻った。 

 

 

The year 1917 was a turning point for me. Joe Lindsey left the band. He had found a woman who made him quit playing with us. It seemed as though Joe did not have much to say about the matter; this woman had made up Joe's mind for him. In any case that little incident broke up our little band, and I did not see any more of the fellows for a long time, except when I occasionally ran into one of them at a gig. But my bosom pal Joe Lindsey was not among them.  

1917年は僕の人生にとっての岐路になった。ジョー・リンゼイがバンドを辞めたのだ。彼は女を作っていて、彼女のせいで僕達との演奏活動をやめることになった。このことについて、ジョーはあまり話したくなさそうだったが、この女がジョーに決心させたのである。いずれにせよ、この小さなきっかけが、僕達のバンドを解散に向かわせてしまい、そして僕は、たまにコンサートなどで出くわす以外は、彼らとも全く顔を合わせなくなった。たまに出くわす「彼ら」の中には、僕の親友ジョー・リンゼイはいなかった。 

[文法] 

He had found a woman who made him quit playing with us 

彼は私達と演奏することを彼に辞めさせた女性を見つけていた(had found / who made ) 

 

When I did see Joe again he was a private chauffeur driving a big, high-powered car. Oh, he was real fancy! There was a good deal of talk about the way Joe had left the band and broken up our friendship to go off with that woman. I told them that Joe had not broken up our friendship, that we had been real true friends from childhood and that we would continue to be as long as we lived. 

ジョーと再会した時、彼はある人物のお抱え運転手になり、立派な車を運転していた。何と素晴らしいことか。ジョーがバンドを辞め、僕達の友情を台無しにし、あの女のもとへと走っていった、この顛末については山のように話がある。僕はバンドのメンバー達にはこういった。ジョーは僕との友情を壊してなどいない、僕達は子供の頃からのマブダチで、これからも一生友達でいるつもりだ、とね。 

[文法] 

he was a private chauffeur driving a big, high-powered car. 

彼は大型で馬力のある車を運転するお抱え運転手だった(driving) 

 

Everything had gone all right for Seefus, as we called Joe, so long as he was just a poor musician like the rest of us. But there's a good deal of truth in the old saying about all that glitters ain't gold. Seefus had a lot of bad luck with that woman of his. In the first place she was too old for him, much too old. I thought Irene was a little too old for me, but Seefus went me one better he damn near tied up with an old grandma. And to top it off he married the woman. My God, did she give him a bad time! Soon after their marriage she dropped him like a hot potato. He suffered terribly from wounded vanity and tried to kill himself by slashing his throat with a razor blade. See ing what had happened to Joe, I told Irene that since she was now going straight, she should get an older fellow. I was so wrapped up in my horn that I would not make a good mate for her. She liked my sincerity and she said she would always love me.  

僕達はジョーのことをシーファスと呼んでいたのだが、彼も僕らと同じ貧乏ミュージシャンでいる間は、物事はそれなりに上手くいっていた。悪運が重なったのは女ができてからで、「光るもの全て金ならず」とは、本当によく言ったものだと思う。まず年が離れすぎている。彼よりウンと年上だ。僕はアイリーンでさえも少し歳が上すぎると思っているのに、シーファスの場合、僕よりももっと年が離れている。女にとっては彼は孫くらいの年齢なのだ。更には、彼は女と結婚してしまう。これで彼の不幸は決定的になった。結婚と同時に女は彼を捨てた。彼は浮かれていた気持ちを一気に傷つけられ、苦しみ、カミソリで首を掻っ切って死のうとしたのだ。女ノーの顛末を見て、僕はアイリーンと話をした。健康を取り戻した今、彼女は僕より大人の男と一緒になるべきた、僕の方も演奏活動が忙しく、彼女の良きパートナーでは居られない、と。僕の気持ちを汲んでくれた彼女は、別れても僕のことを思ってくれると言ってくれた。 

[文法] 

did she give him a bad time 

誠に彼女は彼にひどい人生を与えた(did she give) 

 

After that I went to the little town of Houma, La. ― where the kid we called Houma, at the Home, came from ― to play in a little band owned by an undertaker called Bonds. He was so nice to me that I stayed longer than I had planned. It was a long, long time before I saw Irene or Joe Lindsey, but I often thought about them both.  

アイリーンと別れた後、僕はロサンゼルスのフーマという小さな町へ行った。そこは僕が孤児院にいたころ一緒だった「フーマ」という仲間の出身地だった。ボンズという葬儀屋の小さな専属バンドで演奏するためだ。彼は本当に僕に良くしてくれて、当初の計画よりもうんと長く居させてくれた。アイリーンやジョー・リンゼイと会うのはそのずっとあとになるのだが、僕はしょっちゅう二人のことを考えていた。 

[文法] 

He was so nice to me that I stayed longer than I had planned 

彼は私にとても良くしてくれたので私は前もって計画していたよりも長く居た(so that) 

 

Things had not changed much when I returned to New Orleans. In my quarter I still continued to run across old lady Magg, who had raised almost all the kids in the neighborhood. Both she and Mrs. Martin, the school teacher, were old-timers in the district. So too was Mrs. Laura  ― we never bothered about a person's last name ― whom I remember dearly. Whenever one of these three women gave any of us kids a spanking we did not go home and tell our parents because we would just get another one from them. Mrs. Magg, I am sure, is still living.  

ニューオーリンズに戻った時は、身の回りの様子はさほど変わっていなかった。近所では未だに出くわすのがマグおばさんといって、この近所の子供達はほとんど全員彼女の世話になっている。彼女と学校のマーチン先生が、この近所のご意見番だ。あともう一人、よく覚えている、ローラさんだ(僕達は人様の名字は迷わず覚えている)。この3人衆の内誰か一人でも、僕達近所の子供をしかったら、僕達は家に帰っても決してそのことを両親には話さない。なぜなら同じ目に遭うからだ。マグさんは今でも(1954年)ご健勝だ。 

 

When I returned from Houma I had to tell Mrs. Magg everything that had happened during the few weeks I was there. Mr. Bonds paid me a weekly salary, and I had my meals at his home, which was his under taking establishment. He had a nice wife and I sure did enjoy the way she cooked those fresh butter beans, the beans they call Lima beans up North. The most fun we had in Houma was when we played at one of the country dances. When the hall was only half full I used to have to stand and play my cornet out of the window. Then, sure enough, the crowd would come rolling in. That is the way I let the folks know for sure that a real dance was going on that night. Once the crowd was in, that little old band would swing up a breeze. 

フーマから戻った時、僕はマグさんに、留守にしていた数週間のことを報告しに行かなきゃと思った。ボンズさんは週単位で給料を支払ってくれて、なおかつ彼は支度で僕に食事をさせてくれた。それが彼の面倒見のやり方だったのだ。彼の奥さんは素敵な方で、フレッシュバターを使った豆料理の作り方には目を引いた。豆はリマ豆といって、北部産の豆だ。フーマで一番楽しかったのは、カントリーダンスで演奏した時だった。ホールにお客さんが半分くらい入っただけでも、僕は演奏席を立って窓の外から演奏する羽目になった。するとお客さんがドッと入ってくるという寸法だ。これによってその晩に本物のダンスが披露されるという宣伝告知になったのである。お客さんが入ったところを見図っらって、その小さな伝統あるバンドがイカした演奏を始めるのだ。 

[文法] 

I had my meals at his home, which was his under taking establishment. 

私は彼の家で食事をした、それは彼が人の面倒をみるやり方だった( , which) 

 

Being young and wild, whenever I got paid at the end of a week, I would make a beeline for the gambling house. In less than two hours I would be broker than the Ten Commandments. When I came back to Mayann she put one of her good meals under my belt, and I decided never to leave home again. No matter where I went, I always remembered Mayann's cooking.  

当時の僕は若くて後先考えなかったこともあり、週末に給料をもらうと、一目散に賭場へ向かったものだった。いつもきまって、2時間も経たずにスッテンテンになってしまった。家に帰るとメイアンがおいしい食事を用意してくれていて、僕はそれを堪能した。僕は絶対家をでないと決心したものだ。どこに居ても、メイアンのおいしい食事のことを思っていた。 

[文法] 

Being young and wild 

若くて理性がなかったので(Being) 

 

One day some of the boys in the neighborhood thought up the fantastic idea to run away from home and hobo out to get a job on a sugar cane plantation. We rode a freight train as far as Harrihan, not over thirty miles from New Orleans. I began to get real hungry, and the hungrier I got the more I thought about those good meat balls and spaghetti Mayann was cooking the morning we left. I decided to give the whole thing up.  

[訳] 

ある日のこと、近所の男友達の何人かがとんでもないことを思いついた。家出をしてサトウキビ農場で仕事を得るために旅に出ようというのだ。僕達は貨物列車に乗って、ニューオーリンズから30マイルは離れていないハリハンまでやってきた。僕はお腹がペコペコになってしまった。腹が減るほど益々思い出すのが、出掛けの朝にメイアンが作ってくれた、あの美味しいミートボールスパゲティだった。僕は一抜けた、と決めた。 

[文法] 

the hungrier I got the more I thought 

より腹が減ると、もっと私は考えた(the hungrier the more) 

 

"Look here, fellows," I said. "I'm sorry, but this don't make sense. Why leave a good home and all that good cooking to roam around the country without money? I am going back to my mother on the next freight that passes."  

And believe me, I did. When I got home Mayann did not even know that I had lit out for the cane fields. 

"Son," she said, "you are just in time for supper."  

I gave a big sigh of relief. Then I resolved again never to leave home unless Papa Joe Oliver sent for me. And I didn't either. 

僕は言った「みんな聞いて、ごめん、これだめだ、うまい飯も食えるのに居心地のいい家を飛び出して、一文無しで知らない場所になんか行けないよ。次に反対方向に行く貨車に乗ってお袋のところへ帰るわ」。 

そして僕は本当にそうした。家に戻ってみれば、メイアンは僕がサトウキビ農場へ向かったことすら気づいていなかった。 

彼女は言った「おや、夕飯に間に合ったじゃないか」。 

僕はホッとして大きなため息をついた。そして改めて決心した。パパジョーが行けとでも言わない限り、僕は家を出てゆかないと。そして僕はその決心を守った。 

[文法] 

Why leave a good home 

なぜ家を離れなければならないのか【離れるべきではない】(Why) 

 

I don't want anyone to feel I'm posing as a plaster saint. Like everyone I have my faults, but I always have believed in making an honest living. I was determined to play my horn against all odds, and I had to sacrifice a whole lot of pleasure to do so. Many a night the boys in my neighborhood would go uptown to Mrs. Cole's lawn, where Kid Ory used to hold sway. The other boys were sharp as tacks in their fine suits of clothes. 

I did not have the money they had and I could not dress as they did, so I put Kid Ory out of my mind. And Mayann, Mama Lucy and I would go to some nickel show and have a grand time. 

僕は聖人君子を気取る気はない。人並みに僕も間違いは犯す。でも僕は正直・誠実に生きることが大事だという信念をいつも持っている。くだらないことには目もくれず楽器を演奏するんだと心に決めて、享楽は全て犠牲にしなければ、と思っていた。近所の男友達の多くは夜な夜な出かけていたのがコール夫人の家の庭で、キッド・オリーがその場を仕切っていた。他の連中はパリッとした服を着飾っていた。僕にはそんなお金はなかった。なので、キッド・オリーのことは考えないようにした。そしてメイアンと妹と僕はお手頃な値段で楽しめるショーを見に行き、楽しい時間を過ごしたものだった。