「サッチモ My Life in New Orleans」を読む

生誕120年を迎える、サッチモの「My Life in New Orleans」を読んでゆきます(原文・訳・解説付)

<総集編1>サッチモMy Life in New Orleans 第1章

SATCHMO  My Life in New Orleans 

 

by LOUIS ARMSTRONG (October 1954) Prentice-Hall Inc. New York 

 

chapter 1 (pp7-21) 

 

WHEN I WAS BORN in 1900 my father, Willie Armstrong, and my mother, May Ann or Mayann as she was called were living on a little street called James Alley. Only one block long, James Alley is located in the crowded section of New Orleans known as Back O'Town. It is one of the four great sections into which the city is divided. The others are Uptown, Downtown and Front o' Town, and each of these quarters has its own little traits.  

 

サッチモ  僕のニューオーリンズでの日々 

 

ルイ・アームストロング著(1954年) 

 

僕は1900年生まれ。父のウィリー・アームストロングと、母のメイ・アン ― 通称 メイアン ― はジェームスアレーという小さな通りに面した家に住んでいた。そこからわずか1街区離れたところが、ニューオーリンズの繁華街であるバックオタウンだ。ニューオーリンズを大きく4つの区域に分けた時の一つで、他にも、アップタウン、ダウンタウン、そしてフロントオタウンがあり、それぞれちょっとした特徴がある。 

[文法] 

a little street called James Alley 

ジェームスアレーと呼ばれる小さな通り(called) 

sections into which the city is divided 

その都市が分けられている区域(into which) 

 

 

James Alley not Jane Alley as some people call it lies in the very heart of what is called The Battle-field because the toughest characters in town used to live there, and would shoot and fight so much. In that one block between Gravier and Perdido Streets more people were crowded than you ever saw in your life. There were churchpeople, gamblers, hustlers, cheap pimps, thieves, prostitutes and lots of children. There were bars, honky-tonks and saloons, and lots of women walking the streets for tricks to take to their "pads," as they called their rooms.  

ジェームスアレー(ジェーンアレーという人がいるが、違う)があるのは、街区の中心、その名もバトルフィールド。町の強者どもが住んでいて、よくケンカや発砲を繰り返した場所だ。グラヴィア通りとパーディド通りに挟まれたこの1つの街区に住む人の数といったら、誰にもイメージがわかないだろう。教会で働く人たちからギャンブラー、詐欺師、ポン引き、売春婦、そして子供が沢山いた。飲み屋、安い音楽バー、それからサロンが建ち並び、通りには、「パッド」と呼ばれる連れ込み宿へ男を誘おうとする女が、数多くうろついていた。 

[文法] 

what is called The Battle-field 

いわゆるバトルフィールド(what is called) 

the toughest characters in town used to live there, and would shoot and fight so much 

街で最もタフな連中がそこにかつて住んでいて、そしてよく発砲やケンカをやったものだった(used to / would) 

 

 

Mayann told me that the night I was born there was a great big shooting scrape in the Alley and the two guys killed each other. It was the Fourth of July, a big holiday in New Orleans, when almost anything can happen. Pretty near everybody celebrates with pistols, shot guns, or any other weapon that's handy.  

メイアンは僕に、僕が生まれた夜、二人で撃ち合う大きな発砲事件がジェームスアレーで起きたと教えてくれた。その日は独立記念日で、ニューオーリンズでは大きな祝日であり、何が起きてもおかしくない日なのだ。その日が近づくと、皆が拳銃やショットガン、あるいは手ごろな武器でもってお祝いよろしく発砲するのだ。 

[文法] 

the Fourth of July, a big holiday in New Orleans, when almost anything can happen. 

7月4日というニューオーリンズにとっての大きな祝日はおよそ何でも発生する可能性がある日である( , when) 

 

 

When I was born my mother and father lived with my grandmother, Mrs. Josephine Armstrong (bless her heart!), but they did not stay with her long. They used to quarrel something awful, and finally the blow came. My mother moved away, leaving me with grandma. My father went in another direction to live with another woman. My mother went to a place at Liberty and Perdido Streets in a neighborhood filled with cheap prostitutes who did not make as much money for their time as the whores in Storyville, the famous red-light district. Whether my mother did any hustling, I can not say. If she did, she certainly kept it out of my sight. One thing is certain: everybody from the churchfolks to the lowest roughneck treated her with the greatest respect. She was glad to say hello to everybody and she always held her head up. She never envied anybody. I guess I must have inherited this trait from Mayann.  

僕が生まれたとき、父と母は祖母と一緒に暮らしていた。ジョゼフィーヌ・アームストロング(すごい人なんだ、これが!)というが、長くは続かなかった。二人はよく大喧嘩をし、最後は殴り合いになってしまうのだった。母は出て行ってしまい、僕を祖母に託した。父は他に女を作って、これまた出て行ってしまった。母が住まいを移したのは、リバティー通りとペルディド通りの付近で、その界隈は安めの売春婦が沢山いるところだった。彼女たちの稼ぎは、赤線の本場ストーリーヴィルあたりの相場には届かなかった。母がこれに関わっていたかどうかについては、僕にはわからない。仮に関わっていたとしても、僕の目の届かないところであったはずである。一つだけ間違いないことがある。それは、近隣の人々は、教会関係者から暴力団関係者まで、皆が母に一目置いていたことだ。誰とでも笑顔であいさつを交わし、いつもしっかりと顔をあげて過ごしていた。誰をねたむこともなかった。僕の性格はメイアン譲りだと思う。 

[文法] 

leaving me with grandma 

僕を母のもとに残して(leaving) 

neighborhood filled with cheap prostitutes who did not make as much money 

同額のお金は稼いでいない安い売春婦達で一杯の界隈(filled /  who) 

 

 

When I was a year old my father went to work in a turpentine factory out by James Alley, where he stayed till he died in 1933. He stayed there so long he almost became a part of the place, and he could hire and fire the colored guys who worked under him. From the time my parents separated I did not see my father again until I had grown to a pretty good size, and I did not see Mayann for a long time either.  

僕が生まれて1年した頃、父はジェームスアレー郊外の、工業用の松脂工場に勤めた。彼は1933年に亡くなるまでそこで働くことになる。長い勤めとなり、ほとんど「主(ぬし)」のようであり、自分の部下としての有色人種の採用・解雇を任されるまでになった。両親が離婚後、父と再会するのはずっと後になり、メイアンと再会するのもずっと後のことだった。 

[文法] 

a turpentine factory out by James Alley, where he stayed 

ジェームスアレー郊外の工業用の松脂工場、そこに彼は在籍した( ,where) 

until I had grown to a pretty good size 

結構大きくなるまでずっと(had grown) 

 

 

Grandmother sent me to school and she took in washing and ironing. When I helped her deliver the clothes to the white folks she would give me a nickel. Gee, I thought I was rich! Days I did not have to go to school grandmother took me with her when she had to do washing and housework for one of the white folks. While she was working I used to play games with the little white boys out in the yard. Hide-and-go-seek was one of the games we used to play, and every time we played I was It. And every time I would hide those clever little white kids always found me. That sure would get my goat. Even when I was at home or in kindergarten getting my lessons I kept wishing grandma would hurry up and go back to her washing job so I could find a place to hide where they could not find me.  

祖母は僕を学校に通わせてくれて、その間彼女は洗濯とアイロンがけの仕事を近所からとってきていた。僕が白人のお客さんの家へ頼まれた衣類を届けるのを手伝うと、祖母は僕に小遣いをくれた。1セントではあったが、お金持ちになった気分だった。学校が休みの時は、白人のお客さんの家へ洗濯と家事の仕事をしに行くときに、僕も一緒に連れて行った。祖母が仕事中、僕は庭でその家の白人の子供達の遊び相手をした。かくれんぼは、その遊びの一つで、その最中は僕は子供達からは「あれ」と呼ばれるのだった。そして僕が鬼になるたびに、賢いお坊ちゃま達は僕を見つけ出してしまうのだった。僕にはこれがクヤシかった。家にいるときも学校で授業を受けているときも、早く祖母が来ないかな、洗濯仕事に連れて行ってくれないかな、そうすれば今度こそあの子達に見つからない場所を見つけてかくれんぼができるのに、と思っていた。 

[文法] 

When I helped her derilver 

僕が彼女を配達の手伝いをしたとき(deliver) 

I kept wishing 

僕は願い続けた(kept wishing) 

 

 

One real hot summer day those little white kids and myself were having the time of our lives playing hide-and-go-seek. And of course I was It. I kept wondering and figuring where, oh where was I going to hide. Finally I looked at grandma who was leaning over a wash tub working like mad. The placket in the back of her Mother Hubbard skirt was flopping wide open. That gave me the idea. I made a mad dash over to her and got up under her dress before the kids could find out where I had gone. For a long time I heard those kids running around and saying "where did he go?" Just as they were about to give up the search I stuck my head out of grandma's placket and went "P-f-f-f-f-f!" 

ある暑い夏の日のことだった。例の白人の子供達と僕は、いつものようにかくれんぼをして遊んでいた。勿論、いつも通り僕は「あれ」だった。ぼくはずっと、どこに隠れようか、あれこれ考え、頭の中で思い描いていた。ふと、祖母が必死の形相で洗濯桶に覆いかぶさるように洗濯に励んでいるのを、じっと見つめていた。マザーハバード(割烹着)のスカートの脇あきが、風でバタバタしていた。これだ!と僕は思った。僕は猛ダッシュして、白人の子供達に見つかってしまう前に、彼女の服の中に飛び込んだ。随分としばらくの間、彼らが「あいつ、どこへいったんだろう?」と言いながら走り回っているのが聞こえた。そろそろ探すのを諦めるだろうと思ったところで、脇開きからヌッと頭を出して「プーッ」と言ってやった。 

[文法] 

before the kids could find out where I had gone 

私がどこへ行ったか子供達が見つけることができる前に(had gone) 

 

 

"Oh, there you are. We've found you," they shouted.  

"No siree," I said. "You wouldn't of found me if I had not stuck my head out."  

「あぁ、いたいた、やっとみつけたよ」彼らは叫んだ。 

「いいえ、僕が頭を突き出さなかったら、皆さん見つけられませんでしたよ」と僕は言った。 

[文法] 

You wouldn't of found me if I had not stuck my head out 

もし私が頭を突き出さなかったら、あなた方は私を見つけることはなかっただろう(would...had not stuck) 

 

 

Ever since I was a baby I have had great love for my grandmother. She spent the best of her days raising me, and teaching me right from wrong. Whenever I did something she thought I ought to get a whipping for, she sent me out to get a switch from the big old Chinaball tree in her yard.  

"You have been a bad boy," she would say. "I am going to give you a good licking."  

僕は赤ん坊のころから、祖母の深い愛情を受けて育ってきている。彼女は人生の一番充実した時期に、僕を育て、僕に事の善悪の区別を教えてくれた。僕がむち打ちに値することをしでかした、と彼女が判断すれば、僕を、庭に生えている栴檀の木のところへ行かせて、小枝をとってくるよう言いつけた。 

「お前は悪いことをしている。だからたっぷり鞭を打ってやろう」と彼女は言うのだった。 

[文法] 

something she thought I ought to get a whipping for 

私がそのために鞭打ちを受けるべきだと彼女が考えたこと 

(something[that]she thought I ought to get) 

 

 

With tears in my eyes I would go to the tree and return with the smallest switch I could find. Generally she would laugh and let me off. However, when she was really angry she would give me a whipping for everything wrong I had done for weeks. Mayann must have adopted this system, for when I lived with her later on she would swing on me just the same way grandmother did.  

僕は目に涙を浮かべて木のところへ行き、できるだけ一番小さな枝を見つけて戻ってきた。大概彼女はそれを見て笑うと、僕を許してくれた。でも本気で怒っているときは、僕がしでかし続けたことについてムチを打つのだった。メイアンもきっと同じやり方を踏襲したのだろう。後に彼女の元で生活するようになってからも、彼女は祖母と同じようにしていたからだ。 

[文法] 

the smallest switch I could find 

私が見つけることができた一番小さな枝(switch [that] I could) 

 

 

I remember my great-grandmother real well too. She lived to be more than ninety. From her I must have inherited my energy. Now at fifty-four I feel like a young man just out of school and eager to go out in the world to really live my life with my horn.  

祖母は僕に、本当に良くしてくれた。彼女は90歳を過ぎてなお健在だった。僕の元気はきっと彼女譲りだと思っている。今僕は54歳だが、学校出たての若い子の気分だし、世界に出てラッパ片手にまだまだ生きてゆきたい、と願っている。 

[文法] 

From her I must have inherited my energy 

彼女から私は気力を受け継いだに違いない(must have inherited) 

 

 

In those days, of course, I did not know a horn from a comb. I was going to church regularly for both grandma and my great-grandmother were Christian women, and between them they kept me in school, church and Sunday school. In church and Sunday school I did a whole lot of singing. That, I guess, is how I acquired my singing tactics.  

勿論当時の僕には、ラッパを見ても、蜂の巣みたいな形をしているもの、位にしか理解できなかった。その後、祖母も曾祖母もクリスチャンだったため、僕も教会に通うようになった。教会に行かないときは二人は僕を学校に通わせ、そして教会、そして日曜学校と毎日通わせた。教会と日曜学校では、歌をたくさん歌った。それが、歌の歌い方をマスターするキッカケになったのだと思っている。 

[文法] 

That, I guess, is how I acquired my singing tactics 

そうやって私はの歌唱法を身に着けたのだと思う(how I acquired) 

 

 

I took part in everything that happened at school. Both the children and the teachers liked me, but I never wanted to be a teacher's pet. However, even when I was very young I was conscientious about everything I did. At church my heart went into every hymn I sang. I am still a great believer and I go to church whenever I get the chance.  

学校ではあらゆる活動に参加した。僕は友達からも先生からも好かれたが、先生にゴマすりをしようとは思わなかった。でも僕はうんと小さい頃から、何事にも真面目に取り組んできた。教会では賛美歌を歌うときはどの曲も心を込めた。今でも僕は熱心な信者だと自負しているし、時間を見ては教会に足を運んでいる。 

[文法] 

everything that happened at school 

学校で起きたことすべて(everything that happened) 

 

 

After two years my father quit the woman he was living with, and went back to Mayann. The result was my sister Beatrice, who was later nicknamed "Mama Lucy." I was still with my grandmother when she was born, and I did not see her until I was five years old.  

2年後、父は同居していた女性と別れ、メイアンのところへ戻ってきた。そうして妹のベアトリスが生まれた。後に彼女は「ママルーシー」と呼ばれた。彼女が生まれたときは、僕はまだ祖母のところにいて、僕は5歳になるまで彼女と会う機会はなかった。 

[文法] 

my sister Beatrice, who was later nicknamed "Mama Lucy." 

私の妹ベアトリス、彼女は後に「ママルーシー」とあだ名を付けられた( , who) 

 

 

One summer there was a terrible drought. It had not rained for months, and there was not a drop of water to be found. In those days big cisterns were kept in the yards to catch rain water. When the cisterns were filled with water it was easy to get all the water that was needed. But this time the cisterns were empty, and everybody on James Alley was frantic as the dickens. The House of Detention stables on the corner of James Alley and Gravier Street saved the day. There was water at the stable, and the drivers let us bring empty beer barrels and fill them up.  

ある年の夏、酷い干ばつがあった。何ヶ月も雨がふらず、街中に一滴も水がなかった。当時は各家庭とも大きな貯水タンクを庭に置いて、雨水をためていた。これが満水であれば生活用水は賄えた。しかしこの時はどこの家もタンクは空っぽで、ジェームスアレー中の住民は皆、血眼になって水を求めた。ジェームスアレーとグラヴィア通りの角に刑務所があり、これが住民の危機を救った。厩舎に水が蓄えてあって、監督官達は、空のビール樽を持ってきた住民に対し、水を満タンにしてくれた。 

[文法] 

the drivers let us bring 

監督官達は私達に持ってくるのを許してくれた(let us bring) 

 

 

In front of the stables was the House of Detention itself, occupying a whole square block. There prisoners were sent with "thirty days to six months." The prisoners were used to clean the public markets all over the city, and they were taken to and from their work in large wagons. Those who worked in the markets had their sentences reduced from thirty days to nineteen. In those days New Orleans had fine big horses to pull the patrol wagons and the Black Maria. I used to look at those horses and wish I could ride on one some day. And finally I did. Gee, was I thrilled!  

厩舎の前が刑務所になっていて、一区画全部を占める広さだった。受刑者達は「30日から6ヶ月」という禁錮の期間を告げられてやってくる。彼らは街中の市場の掃除を行い、大きな馬車に乗って行き来していた。市場の掃除に携わる者たちは、禁錮の期間を30日から19日間減じられた。当時のニューオーリンズには警邏用と護送用の馬車を引くために大型の馬が沢山いた。僕はこの馬たちを見るたびに、乗ってみたいと思ったものだった。そのチャンスが来たときワクワクした気持ちは、今でも忘れない。 

[文法] 

Those who worked in the markets had their sentences reduced 

市場で働いた人達は刑期を減少してもらえた 

(Those who worked / had their sentences reduced) 

 

 

One day when I was getting water along with the rest of the neighbors on James Alley an elderly lady who was a friend of Mayann's came to my grandmother's to tell her that Mayann was very sick and that she and my dad had broken up again. My mother did not know where dad was or if he was coming back. She had been left alone with her baby ― my sister Beatrice (or Mama Lucy) ― with no one to take care of her. The woman asked grandmother if she would let me go to Mayann and help out. Being the grand person she was, grandma consented right away to let me go to my mother's bedside. With tears in her eyes she started to put my little clothes on me.  

ある日、ジェームスアレーで近所の人たちと給水を受けていると、メイアンの友達だという年配の女性が祖母のところへやってきた。彼女が言うには、メイアンは体調がとても悪く、更には、よりを戻したはずの父とまた別れてしまったのだという。父は行方知れず、戻ってくるかどうかもわからない。残された彼女と赤ん坊、僕の妹のベアトリス(ママルーシー)の面倒を見る人が誰もいなくなってしまった。その女性は、祖母に、僕をメイアンの手伝いに行かせてやってくれないかと尋ねた。祖母は立派にも、二つ返事で僕を母親のもとへ行かせるといった。目に涙を浮かべて、祖母は僕に子供が着る小さな服を着せてくれた。 

[文法] 

with no one to take care of her 

誰も彼女の面倒を見る人がいない状態で(with no one to take) 

 

 

"I really hate to let you out of my sight," she said. "I am so used to having you now.” 

"I am sorry to leave you, too, granny," I answered with a lump in my throat. "But I will come back soon, I hope. I love you so much, grandma. You have been so kind and so nice to me, taught me everything I know: how to take care of myself, how to wash myself and brush my teeth, put my clothes away, mind the older folks."  

She patted me on the back, wiped her eyes and then wiped mine. Then she kind of nudged me very gently toward the door to say good-bye. She did not know when I would be back. I didn't either. But my mother was sick, and she felt I should go to her side.  

「お前を行かせてしまいたくない。ずっとそばにいてくれたお前を」と祖母は言った。 

「僕もだよ、おばあちゃん。」僕は胸がいっぱいになりながら言った。「でもすぐに戻ってくるからね。おばあちゃん大好き。だって僕にすごく優しく、すごくよくしてくれたし、何でもおばあちゃんから教えてもらったよ。自分で何でもできるし、シャワーも歯磨きも、着替えも自分でできるし、近所のおじいちゃんやおばあちゃんとも仲良くできるようになったよ」 

彼女は僕の背中をなでてくれて、涙を拭くと、僕の涙も拭いてくれた。そして僕の背中を後押しするかのように、優しくドアのほうへと促し、そしていってらっしゃいといった。僕がいつ戻ってくるかどうかは、彼女は知る由もなかった。僕もそうだった。でも僕の母は病気で、祖母は僕が母のそばに行くべきだと思ってくれたのだ。 

[文法] 

I am so used to having you now 

私は今やあなたがそばにいることにとても慣れている(am used to having) 

 

 

The woman took me by the hand and slowly led me away. When we were in the street I suddenly broke into tears. As long as we were in James Alley I could see Grandma Josephine waving good-bye to me. We turned the corner to catch the Tulane Avenue trolley, just in front of the House of Detention. I stood there sniffling, when all of a sudden the woman turned me round to see the huge building.  

その女性は僕の手を取って、ゆっくりと僕を連れてその場を去った。通りに出ると、僕は耐え切れなくなってボロボロと泣いた。ジェームスアレーを歩いている間、祖母のジョセフィーヌがサヨナラと手を振ってくれているのが見えた。角を曲がって、テュレーン通りを走る路面電車を、刑務所前の停留所で待った。僕がメソメソしていると、突然、その女性は僕を刑務所の大きな建物のほうに体を向けた。 

[文法] 

I stood there sniffing 

私はそこに立ってメソメソしていた(sniffing 

 

 

"Listen here, Louis," she said. "If you don't stop crying at once I will put you in that prison. That's where they keep bad men and women. You don't want to go there, do you?" 

"Oh, no, lady."  

Seeing how big this place was I said to myself: "Maybe I had better stop crying. After all I don't know this woman and she is liable to do what she said. You never know."  

I stopped crying at once. The trolley came and we got on.  

「よく聞いて、ルイ。すぐに泣き止まないなら、あの牢屋に入れるよ。男の人も女の人も、悪いことをするとあそこに入れられるんだよ。そんなの嫌でしょ?」 

「はい、嫌です。」 

建物の大きさを目の当たりにして、僕は心でつぶやいた「泣くのをやめなきゃ。何せこの女の人のことよくわからないし、言った通りにしそうだし。どうなるか分かったものじゃない」。僕はすぐに泣き止んだ。路面電車が到着し、僕たちは乗り込んだ。 

[文法] 

Maybe I had better stop crying 

多分私は泣くのをやめるべきだった(had better) 

 

 

It was my first experience with Jim Crow. I was just five, and I had never ridden on a street car before. Since I was the first to get on, I walked right up to the front of the car without noticing the signs on the backs of the seats on both sides, which read: FOR COLORED PASSENGERS ONLY. Thinking the woman was following me, I sat down in one of the front seats. However, she did not join me, and when I turned to see what had happened, there was no lady. Looking all the way to the back of the car, I saw her waving to me frantically. 

これが僕の、人生初の人種差別の体験となった。まだ5歳で、路面電車に乗るのも生まれた初めてだった。僕から先に乗り込んだこともあって、一目散に車両の先頭に歩き進んだ。その時目に入らなかったのが、通路の右側も左側も、各座席の背もたれの裏側にあった表示「有色人種の乗客限定」。その女性も後から来るだろうと思って、僕は前方座席の一つに座った。ところが来ないのだ。どうしたのかと思って振り返ると、姿が見えない。車両の一番後ろのほうまで目をやると、彼女が僕に向かってこっちへ来いと、ブンブンと手を振っていた。 

[文法] 

the signs on the backs of the seats on both sides, which read 

両側の各席の背もたれの裏側にある表示、それにはこう書いてあった( , which) 

 

 

"Come here, boy," she cried. "Sit where you belong."  

I thought she was kidding me so I stayed where I was, sort of acting cute. What did I care where she sat? Shucks, that woman came up to me and jerked me out of the seat. Quick as a flash she dragged me to the back of the car and pushed me into one of the rear seats. Then I saw the signs on the backs of the seats saying: FOR COLORED PASSENGERS ONLY.  

"What do those signs say?" I asked. 

"Don't ask so many questions! Shut your mouth, you little fool."  

彼女は大声で言った「こっちに来なさい。自分の席に座って」。 

僕は彼女が冗談を言っていると思い、それに付き合うつもりでそこに座っていた。どこに座ってもいいじゃないか、ねぇ。あれれと思ったら、彼女は僕のところへやってきて、座席から引っ立てた。次の瞬間、彼女は一目散に僕を車両の後方まで引っ張ってゆき、後部座席へ押し込んだ。その時、僕の目に入った表示が「有色人種の乗客限定」だった。 

「これどういう意味ですか?」僕は尋ねた。 

「あんまりあれこれ聞かないで、黙ってなさい、馬鹿な子ね!」 

[文法] 

so I stayed where I was, sort of acting cute 

だから私は今いる場所にとどまって、ある意味とぼけてふるまっていた(acting) 

 

 

There is something funny about those signs on the street cars in New Orleans. We colored folks used to get real kicks out of them when we got on a car at the picnic grounds or at Canal Street on a Sunday evening when we outnumbered the white folks. Automatically we took the whole car over, sitting as far up front as we wanted to. It felt good to sit up there once in a while. We felt a little more important than usual. I can't explain why exactly, but maybe it was because we weren't supposed to be up there.  

ニューオーリンズ路面電車にあるこれらの表示は変だ。僕達有色人種は、日曜の夕暮れ時に路面電車に乗ってカナル通りのピクニック広場に行こうとするときなど、白人の乗客の人数を上回ると、やったね!という気分になったものだった。必然的に、車両は貸し切り状態、前の方でもどこでも座り放題だ。たまには前のほうに座るのもいい気分だった。いつもより偉くなったような気がした。理由はうまく説明できないが、そこは禁断の場所だったからかもしれない。 

 

 

When the car stopped at the corner of Tulane and Liberty Streets the woman said: 

"All right, Louis. This is where we get off."  

As we got off the car I looked straight down Liberty Street. Crowds of people were moving up and down as far as my eyes could see. It reminded me of James Alley, I thought, and if it weren't for grandma I would not miss the Alley much. However, I kept these thoughts to myself as we walked the two blocks to the house where Mayann was living. In a single room in a back courtyard she had to cook, wash, iron and take care of my baby sister. My first impression was so vivid that I remember it as if it was yesterday. I did not know what to think. All I knew was that I was with mama and that I loved her as much as grandma. My poor mother lay there before my eyes, very, very sick . . .Oh God, a very funny feeling came over me and I felt like I wanted to cry again.  

テュレーン通りとリバティー通りの角で停車した時、女性はいった。 

「さて、ルイ。ここで降りるわよ」。 

電車を降りると、リバティー通りのほうを見た。見渡す限り、大勢の人々が行き来していた。ジェームスアレーみたいだ、と僕は思った。ジェームスアレーには祖母がいるので、懐かしく思えた。それでも僕は、こういう思いを心にしまい込み、メイアンの住む家のある所まで2区画歩き進んだ。裏中庭にある一室で、彼女は食事の用意も、洗濯やアイロンがけも、そして僕の妹の面倒見もしていた。最初の印象が強烈で、今でも昨日のことのように鮮明に覚えている。これをどう考えたらいいのか、わからなかった。とにかく、これから母の傍にいて、祖母と同じように母を愛そう。今僕の目の前にいる母は、気の毒にも病の床に臥せっている。奇妙な感覚に、また泣きたくなってきた。 

[文法] 

My first impression was so vivid that I remember it as if it was yesterday. 

私が最初に抱いた印象があまりにも鮮明で今でも昨日のことのように覚えている(as if) 

 

 

So you did come to see your mother?" she said. "Yes, mama."  

"I was afraid grandma wouldn't let you. After all I realize I have not done what I should by you. But, son, mama will make it up. If it weren't for that no- good father of yours things would have gone better. I try to do the best I can. I am all by myself with my baby. You are still young, son, and have a long ways to go. Always remember when you're sick nobody ain't going to give you nothing. So try to stay healthy. Even without money your health is the best thing. I want you to promise me you will take a physic at least once a week as long as you live. Will you promise?" 

"Yes, mother," I said.  

"Good! Then hand me those pills in the top dresser drawer. They are in the box that says Coal Roller Pills. They're little bitty black pills."  

The pills looked like Carter's Little Liver Pills, only they were about three times as black. After I had swallowed the three my mother handed me, the woman who had brought me said she had to leave.  

"Now that your kid is here I've got to go home and cook my old man's supper."  

「お母さんのところへ来る気になってくれたんだね?」彼女は言った。 

「はい、お母さん。」 

「おばあちゃんがお前を手放さないんじゃないかと思っていたよ。何せ、私はお前に何一つしてやれていなかったんだから。お前達の悪いお父さんさえいなかったらよかったんだよ。お母さんこれから頑張るよ。ちゃんと面倒見るからね。お前はまだ幼くて、長い人生が待っている。忘れないで、病気になっても誰も助けてはくれない。だから健康には気を付けるんだよ。お金がなくなってしまっても、健康第一だよ。約束しておくれ、死んでしまったりでもしない限り、最低週に一度は薬を飲むこと。わかったね?」 

「はい、お母さん。」 

「いい子だ。そしたら箪笥の一番上の引き出しから、さっき言った薬をとっておくれ。コールローラー錠って書いてある箱だよ。ブラックピルみたいに苦いんだ。」 

その薬は、カーター社のリトルリバー錠のようであった。大きさはブラックピルの3倍くらいあった。母が手渡した薬3錠を飲むと、僕を連れてきた女性が、もう帰らなければ、と言った。 

「さあ、坊やも帰ってきたことだし、私帰るね。ダンナの夕飯の支度をしなきゃ。」 

[文法] 

I realize I have not done what I should by you 

私はあなたの傍にいて私がすべきことを何もしていないという自覚がある(what) 

If it weren't for that no-good father of yours thing would have gone better 

あなたたちのあの良くない父親がいなければ物事はよりよく進んでいたはずだった(would have gone) 

 

 

When she had gone I asked mama if there was anything I could do for her.  

"Yes," she said. "Look under the carpet and get that fifty cents. Go down to Zattermann's, on Rampart Street, and get me a slice of meat, a pound of red beans and a pound of rice. Stop at Stable's Bakery and buy two loaves of bread for a nickel. And hurry back, son."  

It was the first time I had been out in the city without my grandma's guidance, and I was proud that my mother trusted me to go as far as Rampart Street. I was determined to do exactly as she said.  

彼女が行ってしまうと、僕は母に何かお手伝いをしようかと尋ねた。 

母は言った「そうね、じゃあ、カーペットの下に50セントあるから探してちょうだい。それを持ってランパート通りのザッターマンという食料品店に買い物に行ってほしいの。肉を一枚、赤豆を1パウンド、お米を1パウンドお願いね。それからステールというパン屋でパンを2斤、2セントのやつね。買い物が済んだら、すぐに戻ってね」。 

僕は初めて、祖母の付添すらなく一人で町中へ出かけることになった。僕は得意だった。母が僕を信用して、ランパート通りまで行かせてくれるのだ。母の言いつけを完全に実行しようと張り切っていた。 

[文法] 

I asked mama if there was anything I could do for her 

私は母に、何か彼女のためにできることはないか尋ねた(if there was) 

 

 

When I came out of the back court to the front of the house I saw a half a dozen ragged, snot-nosed kids standing on the sidewalk. I said hello to them very pleasantly.  

After all I had come from James Alley which was a very tough spot and I had seen some pretty rough fellows. However, the boys in the Alley had been taught how to behave in a nice way and to respect other people. Everyone said good morning and good evening, asked their blessings before meals and said their prayers. Naturally I figured all the kids everywhere had the same training.  

家の裏庭から玄関へでてみると、ボロを着た生意気そうな子どもたちが5、6人道の端に立っていた。僕は運と丁寧に彼らに挨拶をした。何せ、僕はジェームスアレーという、危険な繁華街の出身であり、危険な連中はこれまで何人も見てきていた。とはいえ、そこの少年達は、ちゃんとした態度で振る舞い、他人を尊重していた。皆お互いおはよう、こんばんはと挨拶をしたし、食事の前のお祈りもきちんとやっていた。自ずと、僕はどこの子供達も、同じように躾けられているのだと思っていた。 

[文法] 

After all I had come from James Alley which was a very tough spot 

何せ私は大変危険な地点であるジェームスアレーから来たのだった(had come / which) 

 

 

When they saw how clean and nicely dressed I was they crowded around me.  

"Hey, you. Are you a mama's boy?" one of them asked.  

"A mama's boy? What does that mean?" I asked.  

"Yeah, that's what you are. A mama's boy."  

"I don't understand. What do you mean?"  

A big bully called One Eye Bud came pretty close up on me and looked over my white Lord Fauntleroy suit with its Buster Brown collar. 

"So you don't understand, huh? Well, that's just too bad.'  

彼らは僕が小綺麗な身なりをしているのを見て、周りに群がってきた。 

「おいお前、お母ちゃんっ子だろ?」彼らの一人が訊いてきた。 

「お母ちゃんっ子って、何のこと?」僕は尋ねた。 

「お前のことだよ、お母ちゃんっ子」 

「何言ってんのかわからないんだけど」 

片目のバッドという、ガタイの大きないじめっ子が詰め寄ってきて、幅広の丸襟のついた、リトル・ロード・ファントルロイの白い上着をじっと見つめていた。 

「わかんねぇのかよ、しょうがねぇな」 

[文法] 

that's what you are それが君の有り様だ(what) 

 

 

Then he scooped up a big handful of mud and threw it on the white suit I loved so much. I only had two. The other little ashy-legged, dirty-faced boys laughed while I stood there splattered with mud and rather puzzled what to do about it. I was young, but I saw the odds were against me; if I started a fight I knew I would be licked. 

"What's the matter, mama's boy, don't you like it?" One Eye Bud asked me. 

"No, I don't like it."  

そして彼は片手に泥をすくい取ると、僕のお気に入りの、代わりが一着しかない白いスーツに投げつけた。僕は泥を浴びて立ち尽くしてしまい、どうしたらいいかわからなくなってしまった。他の、足元が泥だらけだったり、顔が汚れていたりする子達が、僕を見て笑っていた。僕は幼いながらも、やり返しても勝ち目はない、返り討ちに合うだろうと見ていた。 

「何だよお母ちゃんっ子、文句あんのかよ」片目のバッドが僕に言った。 

「あぁ、おおありだね」 

[文法] 

if I started a fight I knew I would be licked. 

もし私が喧嘩を始めたら、私はやられることを自覚していた(if / would) 

 

 

Then before I knew what I was doing, and before any of them could get ready, I jumped at him and smashed the little snot square in the mouth. I was scared and I hit as hard as I possibly could. I had his mouth and nose bleeding plenty. Those kids were so surprised by what I had done that they I was too dumbfounded to run after them ― and besides I didn't want to. 

そして、僕は無意識に、そして彼らは出鼻をくじかれた形で、片目のバッドに飛びかかり、口元に一発お見舞いした。僕だってこのままではやられると思い、力いっぱい殴りつけた。口と鼻から血が溢れていた。彼らは僕の奇襲にビックリして、片目のバッドを先頭に一目散に逃げ去った。僕も自分のしたことに驚いて、追討ちをかけることができなかったし、したいとも思わなかった。 

[文法] 

I was too dumbfounded to run after them 

私はとても驚き彼らを追撃できなかった(too dumbfounded to run) 

 

 

I was afraid Mayann would hear the commotion and hurt herself struggling out of bed. Luckily she did not, and I went off to do my errands.  

When I came back mother's room was filled with visitors: a crowd of cousins I had never seen. Isaac Miles, Aaron Miles, Jerry Miles, Willie Miles, Louisa Miles, Sarah Ann Miles, Flora Miles (who was a baby) and Uncle Ike Miles were all waiting to see their new cousin, as they put it.  

"Louis," my mother said, "I want you to meet some more of your family."  

Gee, I thought, all of these people are my cousins?  

僕は、この騒動が母の耳に入り病床から飛び起きて病気を悪化させないか心配になった。幸いなことに、母の耳には届いておらず、僕は母に言いつけられていたおつかいにもどった。 

家に戻ると、母の部屋に人が沢山やってきていた。僕が会ったことのなかった従兄弟たちだった。マイルスという一家で、イサーク、アーロン、ジェリー、ウィリー、ルイーザ、サラ、アン、フローラ(この子は赤ちゃんだった)、叔父のアイク。彼らは皆、自分たちにとって新しい従兄弟となる僕に会いに来てくれたのだ。 

「ルイ、ファミリーが少し増えるからね」と母は言った。 

なんと、この人達みんな、僕の従兄弟なのか? 

[文法] 

and hurt herself struggling out of bed. 

そしてベットから飛び起きて自身を傷つける(struggling) 

 

 

Uncle Ike Miles was the father of all those kids. His wife had died and left them on his hands to support, and he did a good job. To take care of them he worked on the levees unloading boats. He did not make much money and his work was not regular, but most of the time he managed to keep the kids eating and put clean shirts on their backs. He lived in one room with all those children, and somehow or other he managed to pack them all in. He put as many in the bed as it would hold, and the rest slept on the floor. God bless Uncle Ike. If it weren't for him I do not know what Mama Lucy and I would have done because when Mayann got the urge to go out on the town we might not see her for days and days. When this happened she always dumped us into Uncle Ike's lap. 

叔父のアイクは、この子達全員の父親だった。奥さんはこの子達を残して既に他界していた。アイクは男手一つでよく頑張っていた。彼らを養うために、河岸の荷揚げ人足をしていた。稼ぎはあまり良くなく、日雇いではあったが、それでも概ね、なんとか子供達の衣食は欠かさなかった。住まいは一つの部屋しかなく、どうにかこうにか子供達をそこに詰め込んだ。ベットに寝かせられるだけ寝かせ、乗り切らなければ床に寝床を敷いた。叔父は本当に立派だ。メイアンは、街に出かけなきゃとなると、何日も戻ってこなかったから、この叔父がいなかったら、妹も僕も途方にくれてしまうだろう。母は出かける時は、いつも叔父に子供達を任せっきりにしていた。 

[文法] 

If it weren't for him I do not know what Mama Lucy and I would have done 

もし彼がいなかったら、妹と僕はどうしたらいいかわからない(If it weren't for) 

 

 

In his room I would sleep between Aaron and Isaac while Mama Lucy slept between Flora and Louisa. Because the kids were so lazy they would not wash their dishes we ate out of some tin pans Uncle Ike bought. They used to break china plates so they would not have to clean them.  

Uncle Ike certainly had his hands full with those kids. They were about as worthless as any kids I have ever seen, but we grew up together just the same. 

彼のいる部屋では、僕はアーロンとイサークの間で寝て、妹はフローラとルーシーの間で寝た。この子達はとてもだらしなくて、皿洗いをしようとしなかったので、叔父さんが金属製の食器を用意してくれた。ここへ来る前は陶器の食器を使っていて、食事が終われば壊してしまっていたから、皿洗いなどしたことがなかったのだ。 

アイク叔父さんは子供の世話にてんてこ舞いだった。僕もこういう手のかかる子達を見たことはあった。いずれにせよ僕達は、この後共に成長してゆくのだった。 

[文法] 

the kids were so lazy they would not wash their dishes 

この子達はあまりにだらしがなく、皿洗いをしようとしなかった(so lazy they would ) 

 

 

As I have said my mother always kept me and Mama Lucy physic minded.  

"A slight physic once or twice a week," she used to say, "will throw off many symptoms and germs that congregate from nowheres in your stomach. We can't afford no doctor for fifty cents or a dollar."  

With that money she could cook pots of red beans and rice, and with that regime we did not have any sickness at all. Of course a child who grew up in my part of New Orleans went barefooted practically all the time. We were bound to pick up a nail, a splinter or a piece of glass sometimes. But we were young, healthy and tough as old hell so a little thing like lockjaw did not stay with us a long time.  

前にも書いたとおり、母は僕と妹には、薬を服用するよう躾けていた。 

彼女はよくこう言っていた「週に1,2度薬をちゃんと飲めば、病気のキッカケやバイキンなんかを沢山防げるんだ。こういったものはどこから体にはいってくるかわかったもんじゃない。私達が自由に使える50セントや1ドルくらいじゃ、医者なんて呼べないからね。」 

医者にかかるお金を、母は鍋いっぱいの豆ごはんを作るのに使い、母の言いつけによって、僕達兄妹は病気知らずだった。ニューオーリンズの僕が住んでいた場所の子供達は、文字通りいつも裸足でいるのが当たり前だった。当然のことながら、釘だの、棘だの、ガラスの破片だのを時々踏んでしまった。しかし僕達は若くて、大人並みに健康を維持していたから、破傷風ぐらいでは長丁場にはならなかった。 

[文法] 

a child who grew up in my part of New Orleans 

ニューオーリンズの僕がいた地域で育った子供というもの(a child who grew up) 

 

 

Mother and some of her neighbors would go to the railroad tracks and fill baskets with pepper grass. She would boil this until it got really gummy and rub it on the wound. Then within two or three hours we kids would get out of bed and be playing around the streets as though nothing had happened.  

母は近所の人達と一緒に、線路際に行ってはカゴいっぱいにコショウ草を摘んできた。それをしんなりするまで茹でると、子供達の傷口に擦りつけるのだ。そうすると、2,3時間のうちに起き上がれるようになり、何事もなかったかのようにまた通りで遊べるようになった。 

 

 

As the old saying goes, "the Lord takes care of fools," and just think of the dangers we kids were in at all times. In our neighborhood there were always a number of houses being torn down or built and they were full of such rubbish as tin cans, nails, boards, broken bottles and window panes. We used to play in these houses, and one of the games we played was War, because we had seen so much of it in the movies. Of course we did not know anything about it, but we decided to appoint officers of different ranks anyway. One Eye Bud made himself General of the Army. Then he made me Sergeant-at-Arms. When I asked him what I had to do he told me that whenever a man was wounded I had to go out on the battlefield and lead him off.  

古い諺に「神は愚か者の面倒を見る」というのがある。僕達子供が当時、いかに危険な状態にあり続けていたか、考えてみていただきたい。近所には数多くの壊れかけた家屋や建設中の家屋があり、そこには空き缶、釘、板切れ、割れた瓶や窓ガラスが廃材として山積みになっていた。僕達はそういう家屋でよく遊んだものだった。そのうちの一つが戦争ごっこだった。映画でよく戦争のシーンを見ていたからだ。勿論、詳しいことは知るはずもないが、いずれにしても、色々な階級を役割分担して遊ぶのだ。片目のバッドは軍の総司令の役を自分が取り、僕には守衛官の役を当てがった。何をすればいいのかと訊くと、負傷兵を戦場から後方へ連れ戻せと言った。 

[文法] 

the Lord takes care of fools  下記が元と考えられる: 

1849年のフランスの文献(出典不明) 

◆神が救う人間は3種類、愚か者・恋する者・酔っぱらい 

1859年のアメリカ「週刊ハーパー」 

◆神は、愚か者とアル中、そして我が合衆国を目にかけてくれるだろう 

 

 

One day when I was taking a wounded comrade off the field a piece of slate fell off a roof and landed on my head. It knocked me out cold and shocked me so bad I got lockjaw. When I was taken home Mama Lucy and Mayann worked frantically boiling up herbs and roots which they applied to my head. Then they gave me a glass of Pluto Water, put me to bed and sweated me out good all night long. The next morning I was on my way to school just as though nothing had happened. 

ある日のこと、僕が「負傷兵を戦場から後方へ連れ帰る」途中、瓦が屋根から落ちてきて、頭を不意に直撃した。傷は深く、僕は破傷風になってしまった。家に担ぎ込まれたとき、妹とメイアンは、必死になって薬草の葉茎や根を茹でると僕の頭に当てがった。それからプルートウォーター(当時最も売れたミネラルウォーター[便通を良くした])をコップ1杯飲ませ、ベットに寝かせると、一晩たっぷりと汗をかかせた。翌朝僕は、何事もなかったかのように、いつも通り学校へとでかけたのだった。