【英日対訳】ミュージシャン達の言葉what's in their mind

ミュージシャン達の言葉、書いたものを英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:小澤征爾(日・指揮)1999"Charlie Rose"ボストン響と25年/長野五輪/人生最後の曲

https://charlierose.com/videos/10065 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Tuesday 04/20/1999 

1999年4月20日 

 

Charlie Rose  

Dr. SEIJI OZAWA is here. He is the first Japanese Orchestra conductor to achieve prominence in the Western world and is widely credited with helping to bridge the gap between Eastern and Western musicians.  

チャーリー・ローズ 

指揮者の小澤征爾さんにお越しいただいています。欧米を舞台に本格的な成功を収めた、初めての日本人指揮者で、「洋の東西」の音楽家達の架け橋として、大きな一助となったことで、幅広く評価を得ています。 

 

His conducting career began in Tokyo and led him to orchestras in San Francisco and Toronto. Last year, he celebrated his 25th anniversary as music direct of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Here he is conducting that orchestra as they perform in Boston.  

指揮者としてのキャリアは、東京から始まりました。その後、サンフランシスコやトロントのオーケストラで指揮者を務め、昨年、ボストン交響楽団音楽監督就任から25周年を迎えたところです。こちらの映像は、ボストン交響楽団の本拠地での演奏、指揮は小澤征爾さんです。 

 

( “March to the scaffold” by Hector Berlioz)  

ベルリオーズ作曲「幻想交響曲」第4楽章「断頭台への行進」より) 

 

Let me talk about you as a conductor. There a John Williams and other people say the following things about you in terms of qualities as a conductor.  

指揮者としてのあなたの力については、ジョン・ウィリアムズや、他の方達から色々と伺っています。 

 

“ ...is the energy you bring to the podium and an almost ballet-like grace that is, it's an aid in communicating what you want the orchestra to do.”  

「とにかく、指揮台からもたらされるエネルギーが凄い。そしてクラシック・バレエのような優雅さ、これが相まって助けとなって、オーケストラと意思の疎通が、思いのままに出来ている」 

 

Do you agree with that? 

いかがですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I don't know. If you ask my wife, I am really no dancer. I cannot dance, you know? She likes to dance. 

小澤征爾 

どうですかね。妻はダンスが好きなので、訊いていただければわかりますが、そんなにダンサーてほど、大したもんじゃないですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

You became a conductor because you hurt your hands in rugby? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

指揮者になろうと思ったのは、ラグビーをやって手を怪我してしまったからだとか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, these two fingers. 

小澤征爾 

そうなんです、この2本です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ですってね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I was, you know, I wanted to be pianist. 

小澤征爾 

元々、ピアノ弾きになりたかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

To become pianist. But I also had a passion, rugby football. You know, the English rugby. 

小澤征爾 

ピアノ弾きにね。でもラグビーも大好きで、ラグビー、てイギリスのフットボールね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、わかります。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And one game really did it to me. I was number eight. I don't know you know rugby. Number eight is, you know, dangerous spot because have to make a decision very quick. 

小澤征爾 

それで、ある日試合に出た時、ナンバーエイトのポジションだったんですよ。ラグビーのことご存知ですか?ナンバーエイト、ていうのは瞬時の判断ができないと、怪我をするので危ないポジションなんですね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, sometimes they really come to me purposely beginning of a game. And I think that game they tried to do it, and they got me. And knock somewhere. 

小澤征爾 

相手チームは試合中は、意図的に突っ込んできますから、その日の試合も僕にどんどん突っ込んてきて、試合の途中でとうとう僕は倒されてしまったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Before I touch ball. 

小澤征爾 

それも、僕がボールに触れる前にですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, that's supposed not happen, you know? But happened. And then I went down and the people went with the...with the shoes. You know, hard shoes? 

小澤征爾 

これは反則なんですよ、でもやられてしまって、僕は倒れて、突っ込んできた相手の選手達は、シューズですから、わかります?硬いシューズですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, sure, over defences. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、わかります。防ぎきれませんよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And then I cut in-- my nose and mouth become one, inside, you know? And then two fingers were broken. And that ... 

小澤征爾 

それで、鼻と口を切ってしまって、裂け目がつながってしまうくらいにね。それから指を2本骨折して… 

 

Charlie Rose  

That ended your career. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

選手生命を絶たれましたな。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

On the piano. 

小澤征爾 

ピアノ奏者としてのね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Your hopes of being a great pianist. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ピアノ奏者として有名になりたかった夢でしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Because a half year I couldn't play. 

小澤征爾 

だって半年間ピアノが弾けなくなってしまいましたからね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Still, I'mOK 

小澤征爾 

今は大丈夫ですけどね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Well, are you happy? Are you glad, now, that that happened because it turned you to conducting? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょう。で、今となっては良かったというところですか?それで指揮者に転向するキッカケになったということですが。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But that time was a tragedy to me. 

小澤征爾 

その時は災難でしたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

For me. 

小澤征爾 

僕にとってはね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

A tragedy? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

災難、ですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

そりゃそうですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

'Cause you dreamed of being a ...  

チャーリー・ローズ 

だってなりたかったのは… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, very fascinated, too. And then this really wonderful suggestion that my piano teacher said. She says, ''Since there are no many Japanese conductor, why don't you try to become conductor?''  

小澤征爾 

ええ、指揮者にもすごく興味はありました。で、僕のピアノ先生が、スゴイ提案をしてくれたんですよ。「今、日本人で指揮者をしている人は、あまり多くないから、指揮者をやってみたらイイんじゃないかしら。」 

 

And so ... and then also I wanted to go composition, and conducting, and my teacher, Saito, Hideo Saito, was my mother's side relative. So, my mother introduce me to Saito. Was great teacher. 

それと、当時は作曲もやってみたかったので、あと指揮者、それと齋藤秀雄先生といって、僕の先生で、母方の親戚でもあった方がいてですね、母が齋藤先生に僕を紹介してくれたんです。本当に素晴らしい先生だったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

And he made all the difference? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

その先生のおかげで、何もかもが変わったと? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

そのとおりです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Can you identify how your Japanese origin makes you a different kind of conductor? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたが日本人であることで、他の指揮者となにか違いがでているとしたら、それは何だと思いますか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I was born in China. 

小澤征爾 

僕は生まれは中国で。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And about six years old we had to move to Japan because of the war about to start. 

小澤征爾 

6歳の頃に戦争が始まりそうだと言うので、日本に引き揚げなければならなくなったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I am very Japanese, too. But my whole education ... my mother is Christian. So, we had to go to ... how you call? ... Sunday school. 

小澤征爾 

ですから僕は、根っからの日本人でもあるのです。でも僕が受けてきた教育全体を見てみると、母がクリスチャンで毎週…なんて言ったっけ?日曜学校に行かなきゃいけなかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes, I know Sunday school. Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

日曜学校ね、わかります。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

They call. And we sing hymn with organ. So, all my ear was done by Western music ... organ, church music, hymn. 

小澤征爾 

そう言いますよね。それでオルガン伴奏で賛美歌を歌って、ですから耳を鍛えてくれたのは西洋音楽、オルガンに教会音楽、賛美歌です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい、はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But I am Japanese and I grew up in Japan. All of my education were done in Japan, so then become conductor is ... I got this same question before, and I really don't know. 

小澤征爾 

それでも僕は、日本人として日本で育ちました。音楽教育も全部日本で受けましたし、そこから指揮者になって…まあ、その質問は前にも受けたことがあるのですが、実際のところ、よくわからないんですよね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

You don't know? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりませんか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I really don't know. 

小澤征爾 

本当にわからないんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

But you take some ... It was important to you when you came to the United States. I mean, you've been at the Boston Symphony for 25 years. Were you once worked with Leonard Bernstein in New York? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でも何かしらその…あなたが日本人として日本で教育を受けたことが、アメリカに来て、あなたにとって重要なことになったんでしょう。つまり、ボストン交響楽団に25年間ずっといらっしゃって、ニューヨークに居た頃は、レナード・バーンスタインとも一緒に仕事をされたんでしょう? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Right. I was in Europe. And I won a competition in Europe ... France, called the Besanaon. And there was a Charles Munch, conductor. The Charles Munch ... one, two, three. One? Two? Three conductors before me Boston.  

小澤征爾 

そのとおりです。僕はその頃はまだヨーロッパにいました。コンクールで優勝して、ヨーロッパのフランス…ブザンソンのコンクールです。そこで指揮者のシャルル・ミュンシュに出会ったんです。1人、2人、かな?1、2、…3人めですね、僕の3代前のボストン交響楽団の指揮者です。 

 

And I went crazy about him, and I wanted to study under him. And he said, ''You come to Tanglewood, then I teach you.''  

僕はシャルル・ミュンシュのことが大好きになってしまって、彼に弟子入したくなったんですよ。そうしたら「タングルウッドに来ることがあったら、教えてやろう」と言ってくれたんです。 

 

And I thought he would really teach me. He gave me only one lesson though. But I was lucky. I was invited ... he arranged ... Madame Koussevitzky invited me.  

僕は真に受けて、実際は1回きりのレッスンだったんですけどね。でも本当に運が良くて、呼んでくれたのが、亡くなられたクーセヴィツキーの奥様だったんですよ。 

 

So, I came. And studied in Tanglewood. Was wonderful for me. That what really changed my life, I guess. 

それでアメリカへ来て、タングルウッドで勉強して、僕にとっては素晴らしい経験でした。僕の人生が、本当に変わったと思いますよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

It did? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

変わりましたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

変わりましたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Because of? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それというのも… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I came first time to United States 1960. And then spend one summer, and I learned what I don't know. You know? I learned so many things. And I learn also what I didn't study.  

チャーリー・ローズ 

僕が初めてアメリカに来たのが1960年です。その時は一夏かけて、それまで全然知らなかったことを学んだんです。物凄く沢山学びました。それに、学校で教わっていなかったことも学びました。 

 

So, I started to study more, more, more. I never knew Mahler's symphony by myself. I had to study right there. Start study. 

ですから、そこからどんどん、どんどん勉強し始めたんです。マーラー交響曲なんて全然知りませんでしたし、とにかくそこで勉強しなきゃ、勉強はじめなきゃ、て思ったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And Leonard Bernstein was looking for assistant conductor. And Mrs. Koussevitzky arrange me to have a interview Lenny. 

小澤征爾 

それと、レナード・バーンスタインが副指揮者を募集しているということで、クーセヴィツキーの奥様が取りなしてくれて、レニーと面接できるようにしてくれたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうだったんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And Lenny was tour with the New York Philharmonic in Berlin September. So, I went after Tanglewood. Tanglewood, they gave me Koussevitzky Prize. 

小澤征爾 

レニーはその時、9月にベルリンで、ニューヨーク・フィルハーモニックとコンサートツアー中だったんですよ。タングルウッドでは最後に、研修生に対して授与されるクーセヴィツキー賞を、僕が頂いたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

It was very wonderful prize. 

小澤征爾 

とても光栄でした。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Who as at that time, I assume, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

当時、ボストン交響楽団の指揮者は、誰でしたっけ? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Charles Munch 

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Was then. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

当時はね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... was conductor. Oh, yeah. This is why I went to Tanglewood, Boston, Tanglewood, to get the lesson from Charles Munch. He was wonderful, but only one lesson, though. He was ... But anyway, I loved him.  

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュが指揮者でした。そうですよ、それがあるからタングルウッド、ボストン交響楽団のタングルウッドに来て、シャルル・ミュンシュからレッスンを受けたんですよ。彼は素晴らしい、でも1回きりのレッスンでしたけどね。でも、いいんです、僕は彼の大ファンですから。 

 

And Lenny, I never met Lenny. And the first time I met Lenny was in Berlin, right at next month from August ... September in Berlin.  

次にレニーですが、その時はまだ会ったことがなくて、初めてレニーに会ったのはベルリンです。タングルウッドのすぐ次の月、8月…9月ですね、ベルリンで。 

 

And, you know, he did interview. I supposed to have interview. I was ready after his concert in free radio station concert, public concert. He said ... and he come with committee and about five men ... he, me ... we went to Rififi Bar  

それで、彼が面接してくれたんです。面接することになったんです。彼がラジオ局の無料公開演奏会をしていて、その後で面接を受けるよう、僕もスケジュールを合わせていました。彼が言ったのは…彼は関係者5人位と一緒に出てきて、それで、僕も一緒に、西ベルリンのリフィフィ・バーに。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Rififi Bar. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

リフィフィ・バーですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I still remember where it is, which corner. And he ask me few musical question, and with his committee there ... it was also drinking. I'm drinking. And about 20 minutes later I think he made the decision with committee. 

小澤征爾 

今でも覚えていますよ、どこにあるのか、町のどの辺りかもね。それで彼は2,3音楽関係の質問をして、あと一緒に居た関係者の人達と…一緒に飲んでいましたよ。僕も飲んでました。話し始めて20分位で、彼は関係者の人達と、結論を出したんじゃないですかね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

To hire you? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたを採用すると? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. And so first time I came back as assistant conductor to New York. He had always three conductors, still Carnegie Hall, mind you. So, I checked in Wellington Hotel for a few nights. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。その後、まずは戻って、副指揮者としてニューヨークに行きました。彼には常時3人の副指揮者がいました。カーネギーホールです、わかりますよね。それで、ウェリントンホテルに2,3日逗留することにしたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

And he ... so he had an influence on your life and changed your life? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、彼が、あなたの人生に影響を与えて、人生を変えたと? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. And it was wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。それも素晴らしく。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Koussevitzky was .. wasn't he conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for about 25 years? Or was he never conductor of the ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

クーセヴィツキーですが…彼はボストン交響楽団の指揮者じゃありませんでしたか?25年間くらい、それとも指揮者ではなかったか… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Oh, yes. He was a long time. 

小澤征爾 

ええ、そうです。長い間指揮者でしたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

For a long time, 25 years. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

長い間、25年間ですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I don't know how many years. But long time Koussevitzky. 

小澤征爾 

何年かはわかりませんが、クーセヴィツキーは長いですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But I never met Koussevitzky. I was too late. 

小澤征爾 

ただ僕は、クーセヴィツキーとは会ったことがないんですよ。ずっと前の人ですからね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He was dead. 

小澤征爾 

もう亡くなっていましたから。 

 

Charlie Rose  

He was dead by the time you ... yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

彼は亡くなっていた、あなたが…そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But Leonard Bernstein told me about him, about Koussevitzky many times. 

小澤征爾 

でもレナード・バーンスタインから彼のことは、クーセヴィツキーのことは何度も話を聞きました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, but it was his wife that took an interest in you? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。ただ、あなたに興味を示してくれたのが、クーセヴィツキーの奥様だったんですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. Mrs. Koussevitzky, influenced by Charles Munch. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。クーセヴィツキーの奥様です。そして僕が影響を受けたのは、シャルル・ミュンシュです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So ... 

小澤征爾 

ですから… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Now, whatever happened between you and Charles Munch after that one lesson? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、たった1回だけのレッスンの後、シャルル・ミュンシュとはどうなったんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Oh, yeah. But, yes, he was wonderful. And then I ... after ... No, no, before that. I invite ... then I was a Ravinia Festival, Chicago 

小澤征爾 

ええ、彼は素晴らしい指揮者ですから、その後ですね…いや、前だったかな…その頃僕は、シカゴのラヴィニア音楽祭にいましてね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right, in Chicago. Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、シカゴですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Before Toronto, I was a musical director there. And I invited him. He came. He came. I went to airport with my car and pick him up, came ... And he was wonderful to watch him. You ever watch him closely? 

小澤征爾 

トロントに行く前ですから、僕が音楽監督をさせてもらっていて、彼を招待したんです。彼は来てくれました。来てくれましたよ。僕が空港まで、車で彼を迎えに行ったんです。間近で彼を見れるなんて、素晴らしいことでした。あなたは間近で彼を見たことはありますか? 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ありますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He almost like smiling to the orchestra at one point, then all orchestra sound change because he smile. 

小澤征爾 

彼はオーケストラを目の前にして、演奏中あるところでニッコリ微笑むと、オーケストラ全体の音がガラッと変わるんですよ。微笑んだことでね。 

 

Charlie Rose:  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And that's too, on a very big. 

小澤征爾 

それも、大きく変わるんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Now, what does that say to you about conducting? In terms of ... beyond what the baton does and beyond what the hand does, that you can infuse an orchestra with your entire face and body. You know? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、その指揮ぶりを見てどう思いましたか?つまり…指揮棒にしろ、手先にしろ、オーケストラに対して、表情だの、体全体だので、何を吹き込むことが出来るのか、ということですが。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I ... I ... I don't know. You know, I studied under Saito, Hideo Saito. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね、何と言ったらいいか。僕は指揮を齋藤秀雄先生に学んだんですが。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Wonderful teacher, cellist, studied Germany. And all the details, all the musical details, all this construction, all this ... phrasing, he taught me. 

小澤征爾 

素晴らしい先生で、チェロも弾く方です。ドイツで学んだ方ですが、細かいこと、音楽面での細かいこと、曲の作り方、これ全部、フレーズの持ってゆきかたも、彼は僕に教えてくれました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, that's all my knowledge and my experience. And then, you know, Tanglewood, and right after Tanglewood, I was chosen to be four of the ... one of the four students, of Maestro von Karajan. 

小澤征爾 

それで、それが全部、僕の知識と経験の基本になっているんです。その後ですね、タングルウッドに来て、その直後に、カラヤン先生の指導を受けれる4人の1人に選ばれたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

In Berlin. 

小澤征爾 

ベルリンでね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Herbert von Karajan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ヘルベルト・フォン・カラヤンのことですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, that was also wonderful to study one year. 

小澤征爾 

そうです、1年間素晴らしい勉強をさせてもらいました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

What did you learn from him? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

カラヤンからどんなことを学びましたか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

You know what he does? Many people misunderstand him because he look very ... every picture he look very ... 

小澤征爾 

彼の仕事ぶりはご存知ですか?多くの人が彼を誤解しています。というのも、彼は見かけが…どの写真を見ても、見かけが… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Stern and formidable. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

いかめしくて、物々しいですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And he is. First, you know, time when I saw him. But, when you know him ... took me about 15 years after I met him -- first time I was student, become very close. I feel very close. 

小澤征爾 

そうなんですよ。僕が初めて彼を目の前で見た時はですね、そうでした。でも、彼の人となりを知って、その15年後に、彼が僕を呼んでくれて、そこで会った時は…最初に生徒として出会った時は、とても親しく、親しくしてくれたと感じましたね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And, after I become very close to him, I can call any time. I know, when I call, he may say, ''Seiji, I'm busy.'' Kung! That doesn't mean anything. He hates me or not. 

小澤征爾 

それで、彼と親しくなった後も、別にいつ連絡をとっても構わないと言われています。それで実際に連絡を取ると、「セイジ、今忙しいんだ」といって、ガチャンと切られる。別に意味はないんですよ。僕のことを嫌いとかそうでないとか。 

 

Charlie Rose  

It's not personal. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

懐に入りづらい人ですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He just busy. 

小澤征爾 

単に忙しいだけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でしょうけどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And I was not lucky to catch him on nice time. I thought .... 

小澤征爾 

丁度いい時に彼を捕まえられる、運に恵まれていないだけです。そう思って… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I call back again. And then sometimes a half hour by talk telephone. 

小澤征爾 

それで、後から電話をかけ直すと、時には30分くらい電話で話しますよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa:  

And it's wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

それも素晴らしいことです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

But did he give you something musically? I mean, did you learn something important that helped you in your own evolution? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ただ、彼は何か音楽的なことを、あなたに教えてくれたんですか?つまり、あなたが指揮者として成長する上で、助けになるような、そういう大事なことは教えてくれたんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. You know what he did was-- his basic thing is very interesting, like chamber music, play, a musician makes sound. 

小澤征爾 

ええ。彼が教えてくれたのはですね、彼の基本は、とても面白いですよ。室内楽みたいにですね、演奏する、つまり音を鳴らすのは、演奏者であるということです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ほお。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

This he feel everybody have listen each other to ... listening each other to make music. And his way is put everybody that condition. You know, he conducts, but even he sometimes close his eyes. 

小澤征爾 

彼の感じ方というのは、全員がお互い聴き合えと、お互い聴きあって音楽を作るんだと。彼のやり方は、全員をそういう状態に持ってゆく、ということです。つまり、彼は指揮を降るんですが、目を閉じてしまうことも時々あります。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But he ask everybody to listen and watch each other to make music together. That ... even he ask this opera. You know, thing that's on stage?  

小澤征爾 

でも彼は、奏者全員にお互い聴きあって、視線を合わせて、そうやって音楽を一緒に作れ、と言うのです。それは…彼はオペラをやる時も、それを要求してきます。わかります?舞台上でですよ。 

 

Let's say, like, Falstaff ... example sing a soloist. Orchestras are here. He ask both side to listen each other, which is not so easy because of a distance.  

例えば、ヴェルディの「ファルスタッフ」で、ソリストが歌って、オーケストラが居て、両方にお互い聴きあえ、と要求するんです。こんなの簡単じゃないですよ。距離がありますからね。 

 

But he really insist. That, I think, basic his way. That one technical way or basic thing. Other thing is he has-- when he taught us Sibelius, when I tried to busy conducting everybody ... he said, ''No, no, no, no. That orchestra member, they do it. You have to make long phrase, long line.'' 

それでも彼は、絶対そうしろというんです。これ、僕の考えですが、彼のやり方の基本になっているんでしょうね。技術的な面にせよ、基本にせよね。もう1つは、彼はですね…シベリウスの曲の指揮を教えてくれたときなんですが、僕が必死に指揮をしていると、彼が言うんです「違う、違う、そんなことは楽団員の仕事だ、君はフレーズの大きな流れを作って示せば良いんだよ。」 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

That his ... you can imagine that he does that, too. 

小澤征爾 

それが彼の…わかりますか、彼のやり方です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Sure, sure. Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He was wonderful was for that. And my teacher Saito, Hideo, was very detailed, very much, very clear. 

小澤征爾 

そのことについては、彼は本当に素晴らしいと思います。僕が教わった齋藤秀夫先生は、とにかく細かいところまで、とにかく盛りだくさん、とにかく分かりやすくハッキリ、でしたから。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

You know? Cut. So ... and the Lenny was a big heart, you know? 

小澤征爾 

カラヤンは「全部いらない!」というわけです。そして…レニーですが、彼は、とにかく心の広い人です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I was very lucky these three ... 

小澤征爾 

ですから、僕は本当に幸運なことに、この3人の… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Boy, you have really have had extraordinary ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ですよね、本当に素晴らしい指導者の… 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Actually four.  

小澤征爾 

実際は4人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

... influences. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

影響を受けられましたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Saito. 

小澤征爾 

齋藤先生も入れて4人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Saito. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

齋藤先生ね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And Charles Munch. 

小澤征爾 

それとシャルル・ミュンシュですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Charles Munch. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

シャルル・ミュンシュですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Maestro von Karajan. And Lenny as my boss ... I was assistant. 

小澤征爾 

カラヤン先生、それと、僕のボスのレニー、僕が副指揮者を… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... more than two years, you know? And so-- And Lenny was really genius. And I call him ''wonderful American man.'' 

小澤征爾 

2年以上務めました。それからですね、レニーは本当に天才ですよ。僕は彼のことを「素晴らしきアメリカ人」と呼んでいます。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Tried to be free. Tried to be fair. To equal. You know, colleague? Even though I was small. 

小澤征爾 

自由に、公正に、公平にを心がけていましたよね。それも、仲間として。僕なんかウンと小さい存在だったのにですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He big. Equal, wonderful though. I have many memories. 

小澤征爾 

彼は人間が大きくて、誰に対しても平等で、本当に素晴らしい人です。思い出も沢山あります。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Is your-- today, having lived in Boston, having a reputation as being a Red Sox fan, true and true. Do you think of yourself as Chinese? As Japanese? As American? Or all? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたは、今ボストンにご自宅があって、レッドソックスの筋金入りのファンだとの評判です。あなたはご自身を、中国人、日本人、アメリカ人、どれだと思っていますか?それとも、どの要素もあると 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

I am very Japanese. 

小澤征爾 

まったくの日本人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But also, when I come back to Boston from my holiday or visit in Japan ... to Japan ... from Japan to come back, I feel like I came home-- came back to home. 

小澤征爾 

でも同時にですね、休暇からボストンに戻ってくると、あるいは日本に居て、日本に行って、日本から戻ってくると、ああ、家に帰ってきたな、て感じますね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Back to Boston is ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ボストンに帰ってきたな、と。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Back to Boston ... home. 

小澤征爾 

ボストンに、家に帰ってきたな、と感じますね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

... home. Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

家に帰ってきた、なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, in that moment, I guess I'm a Bostonian. 

小澤征爾 

ですから、そんな時は、僕はボストニアンだな、と思っています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

American. And America is like my country. That's-- I think, everybody feels that way. When-- if you live-- this country has this kind of a character, everybody feel this is our country, “my country.”' 

小澤征爾 

アメリカ人、アメリカは自分の国みたいなものです。それは、皆そう感じているんじゃないでしょうかね。もしこの国に家を持って、このkにはそういう性格があるでしょう、皆そう感じていますよ、この国は私達の国、自分の国だ、とね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

What did it mean to you to conduct at the Olympics in 1998? Five symphonies ... Beethoven's 

チャーリー・ローズ 

1998年のオリンピックで指揮をなさいましたけど、あなたにとってどんな経験になりましたか?5大陸からオーケストラが、ベートーヴェンの… 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Beethoven Ninth, finale. 

小澤征爾 

ベートーヴェンの第9の最終楽章ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Finale. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

最終楽章ですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You watch that. It's Opening Ceremony. 

小澤征爾 

ご覧になりましたか、開会式ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Billions watching you. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

勿論です、数十億人の視線があなたに集まったわけですからね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Yes. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Billions. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

数十億人ですよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But was very dangerous thing I got ... I had the idea, you know? Five continent, Olympic, you know? Five continent. 

小澤征爾 

でもあれは、本当にヒヤヒヤしました。あの案を受けたときはね。5大陸から、オリンピックで、5大陸からですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

To play together, same moment. 

小澤征爾 

同時に一緒に演奏しよう、というわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

I am in concert hall in Nagano. 

小澤征爾 

僕は長野市内の音楽ホールにいました。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, in Nagano. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね、長野でした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And about 10 minutes by car there was a huge Olympic ... how you call this? ... you know, the Opening Ceremony, many, many thousand people there. Very cold. And 3,000 chorus people, an actual Japanese chorus. They memorized Beethoven Ninth, finale -- whole thing. 

小澤征爾 

車で10分くらい行ったところに、大きなオリンピックの…なんて言ったっけ、オリンピックの開会式ですよ、何千人も人が居て、とても寒い中、3000人の合唱団、これは日本人の合唱団です。ベートーヴェンの第9の最終楽章を、全部楽譜を見ないで、憶えて歌ったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And they rehearsed with me with orchestra. Orchestra was combination pick-up orchestra from all over, from Vienna, from Berlin, Paris, London, America, Boston, San Francisco, China, Beijing, Japanese orchestra, blah, blah, blah, Russian -- everybody there. And then five continent, United Nation, Boston Chorus, Tanglewood Festival Chorus, and Beijing Chorus, and German-- Berlin Chorus. 

小澤征爾 

それで、オーケストラと一緒にリハーサルをやるわけです。オーケストラのメンバーは、ウィーン、ベルリン、パリ、ロンドン、アメリカ、ボストン、サンフランシスコ、中国、北京、日本国内からも、それからロシア、世界中からの奏者の合同合奏です。そして、5大陸、国連本部、ボストンの合唱団、タングルウッド・フェスティバル合唱団、それから北京の合唱団、それと、ドイツはベルリンの合唱団は… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Chorus. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

合唱団が各地からね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... in Brandenburg Gate, very late night, early morning, early, early morning. 

小澤征爾 

ブランデンブルク門から、あそこは夜ウンと遅い時間、日付が変わって、ほとんど早朝の時間でしたね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And Africa, Capetown Chorus. 

小澤征爾 

それから、アフリカのケープタウンの合唱団。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I conduct orchestra, and they sing watching my beat to ... 

小澤征爾 

そして僕は、オーケストラの指揮を担当して、皆が僕の指揮を見て、拍を取るわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Oh, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... sing together. And you know, when you watch the CNN News ... 

小澤征爾 

それで一緒に歌うわけです。あのですね、例えばCNNのテレビでニュースなんかを見ると… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... when you question, the person who answer ... 

小澤征爾 

司会者が質問すると、答える人が… 

 

Charlie Rose 

By satellite. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

衛星中継のことですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But two second, one second 

小澤征爾 

1,2秒位… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Still ... “Ah, yes, yes. Yes, yes.”' You know that moment delay? 

小澤征爾 

じっとして…「あ、ええ、ええ」なんて、一瞬遅れるじゃないですか。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうです、そのとおりです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That delay was enemy for us because, you know satellite takes time. And NHK, one man .. 

小澤征爾 

あれはいけない、衛星中継だと間があくんですよね。そこでNHKのある方が… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, in Japan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、日本の放送局ですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

National Company made machine to make this ... 

小澤征爾 

日本の国営放送の技術スタッフさんが用意してくれたのが… 

 

Charlie Rose 

One. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

一体化するために。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

All together, one. 

小澤征爾 

皆が一つにまとまるためにですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I tell you very simple. I mean, simple but it's very difficult to do. He hold our sound, like close it sound, our sound, orchestra sound wait until latest one, which is from South Africa and also Sydney, comes latest one, until latest one arrive moment, hold it.  

小澤征爾 

単純なものの言い方をしましたけれど、単純ですけど、物凄く難しいことです。そのスタッフの方が、僕らが鳴らす音を保留にして、音をしまい込むように、オーケストラの音が、一番遅く飛んでくる音を待つんです。南アフリカと、シドニーからのが、一番遅かったかな。一番最後の音が飛んでくるまで、保留にするんです。 

 

And then put together, then on the air. So, when you on the air, comes ... was delay of our sound. The machine hold earlier sound until latest sound comes. 

それを一つに合わせて、発信する。ですから発信する時は、僕らのオーケストラの音は、遅れます。機械が、一番最後に飛んでくる音を、一番最初に鳴らした音が待つように、保留にするんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, a second later. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね、1秒差がありますからね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Yeah. But that ... going like ...Whup! Together. Can you imagine? 

小澤征爾 

そうです、でもそうやって、こう…ドン!と一緒に、わかりますか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますとも。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That means, mechanically together, right? 

小澤征爾 

つまり、機械が一つにまとめてくれるわけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But musically together is another question. You understand? 

小澤征爾 

ただ、音楽的に一体感がでるかどうかは、別問題ですけどね。わかりますか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

どういうことですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

When I conduct, even same stage sometimes not together or opera off-stage band could be not together, can be not together. Could be catastrophe. So, I was so nervous. 

小澤征爾 

指揮をしている時は、同じ舞台上にいるときでさえ、一体感が出ないことがあります。オペラの舞台裏で吹いているバンダとか、一体感が出ないことがあります。大混乱になるかもしれないんですよ。ですから神経を使います。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Because everybody rehearse and everything was set up with lots of work. I conduct. And, if not together, that moment everybody will laugh at me because many people said, ''Seiji, that's too dangerous.'' 

小澤征爾 

ですから皆が事前に練習して、全部を沢山手間ひまかけて、整えて作って、僕が指揮を振る。もし揃って演奏できなかったら、その瞬間笑われるのは僕です。というのも、事前に多くの人から言われていたんです「セイジ、そのプランは危険すぎるよ。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それはそうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

''Don't do that.'' And lucky. General rehearsal could be only that morning, about two hours before ceremony-- was together. It was quite together.  

小澤征爾 

「やめとけよ」でも、運が良かったんです。全体練習は1回だけ、当日の午前中だけです。2時間後に開会式、というところでした。揃ったんです、完璧に揃ったんです。 

 

And two hours rest, come back again, do it again. And, again, more, even more together. So, at end was almost miracle. We have very good luck. Musically very together.  

2時間休憩して、配置について、もう一度、いよいよ本場です。本番は更に揃い方が良かったです。終わった瞬間、奇跡だと思いました。本当に運が良かった。音楽的にも、素晴らしい一体感でした。 

 

Of course, machine was together. So, what do you hear? It's together like no problem, but could be. Could have been a big problem, you know? 

勿論、機械も一緒にお手柄です。ですから、本番どうでしたか?全く問題なく、揃って演奏できました。でも危なかったですよ。メチャクチャになる可能性はありましたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Boy, you must have ... at the end of that you must have said, ''Whew.'' 

チャーリー・ローズ 

いやはや、そうでしたか。終わった瞬間、あなたとしては「ふー!やれやれ!」といったところですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

''Ooof.'' 

小澤征爾 

「ふー!やれやれ!」ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And, of course, I had to thank all those conductors, my colleagues... 

小澤征爾 

それから勿論、僕の仲間達に指揮者として演奏に加わってもらったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

...who, you know, also conducted. To watch, you know, my ... the monitor is too small to watch for a big chorus so some assistant conducting ... my colleague conduct with monitor. So, that people must be very good. 

小澤征爾 

彼らも棒を振ってくれたんです。大合唱団が、僕の姿をモニターで見るには、モニターは小さすぎますから、僕の仲間達が、僕の姿をモニターで見て、棒を振ってくれたんです。彼らの手柄が素晴らしかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

So, they can see. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうやって、奏者全員が指揮を確認できたわけですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

本当に素晴らしかったです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. The Boston Symphony Orchestra ... What do you hope that you have accomplished there? What have you brought to the orchestra that you are proud about? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。さて、ボストン交響楽団についてですが…あなたとしては、このオーケストラで成し遂げたいことはありますか?ご自分自身、胸を張って、これをオーケストラにもたらす、というものは何ですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You know, before Koussevitzky, I do not know. But Koussevitzky I know from disk, from what Leonard Bernstein told me. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね、クーセヴィツキーが以前どうしていたかは、僕は知りません。勿論、クーセヴィツキーの演奏は、CDでも知っていますし、レナード・バーンスタインから話は聞いています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He must be ... he was ... he must be very colorful man and very romantic, colorful conductor. And then Charles Munch came. He was French and also conducted the German repertoire, but more like very French and the orchestra become very colorful, sensitive, beautiful sound and color. 

小澤征爾 

きっと彼は、とても華やかで、ロマンチックで、華やかな指揮者だったんでしょう。その後が、シャルル・ミュンシュです。フランス人指揮者で、勿論ドイツ系の音楽もレパートリーとしていましたけれど、彼はどちらかと言えばフランスの色合いがうんと強いですから、オーケストラも華やかで、繊細で、美しい色合いになるわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

When I arrived, great Boston Symphony Orchestra, colorful, wonderful. But I wanted also Boston Symphony to be like German orchestra, like heavier sound. 

小澤征爾 

僕は、この偉大なボストン交響楽団に就任したわけです。素晴らしいオーケストラで、華やかで、でも僕としては、ボストン交響楽団には、ドイツ系の、もう少し重厚な音が出せるようになってほしいな、と思ったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Like von Karajan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ヘルベルト・フォン・カラヤンばりですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Rich sound. 

小澤征爾 

ふくよかなサウンドですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And my teacher, Saito, studied in Germany. So, very much German style. So, my education was all German. My piano teacher was a specialist for Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach ... played piano.  

小澤征爾 

それから僕が教わった齋藤先生が、ドイツで学んだこともあって、物凄くドイツ系のやり方で、僕が受けた教育も、全部ドイツ系でした。ピアノ先生もバッハ、ヨハン・セバスティアン・バッハがご専門でした。ピアノで弾く曲がね。 

 

So, and I was thinking maybe Boston Symphony could become heavier sound, deeper sound, let's say ... deeper. But took me long time-- not one year, two year ... maybe 10 years. After ... I didn't realize, but I recognized, ''Oh, they changed. We changed it.''  

ですから、多分ボストン交響楽団も重厚感や深みのあるサウンドになっていくのかな、と考えていました。重厚感、ですね。でも時間がかかりました。1年や2年でなくて、10年位経った頃ですかね、意識はしなかったのですが、なんとなく感じたのが「あら、音が変わった。変わったよ」 

 

I think Boston Symphony are ready ... Now, we are ready both ... and the wonderful thing is, you know, when become deeper sound and darker sound for German repertoire like Brahms, Beethoven, Bruckner, Mahler, all this ... I afraid we lose colorful area, sensitive area. No. That tradition is so strong. 

僕が思うには、ボストン交響楽団というのは、出来上がっていると言うか、両方とも出来上がっていると言うか、これってスゴイことなんですけれど、サウンドに深みと渋みが増して、ドイツ系の楽曲、例えばブラームスベートーヴェンブルックナーマーラー、こういうの全部、もしかしたら今まで華やかだった部分が失われてしまうかな、と思うでしょう。ところが違うんです。その伝統は強固に守られているんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

You mean all the things that Munch brought. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それは、シャルル・ミュンシュがもたらした部分、ということですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Munch brought. 

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュがもたらした部分です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No, we didn't lose. When they face Berlioz, become colorful again. But still they play wonderful, you know, Bernard Haitink, one of the German-type conductor comes, they play wonderful Brahms. 

小澤征爾 

そこは失われていなかったんです。ベルリオーズの曲をやる時は、華やかさがたちまち戻ってきます。ベルナルト・ハイティンクという、彼はドイツ系の音楽のタイプの指揮者ですけれど、彼が来た時は、ボストン交響楽団は素晴らしいブラームスの演奏をしました。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Or wonderful Mahler. When comes French repertoire, they play colorful. 

小澤征爾 

マーラーも素晴らしかったです。フランスの楽曲を演奏する時は、華やかさが演奏に出てくるんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, tradition there, but become wider. I think that's-- I mean, not just me. You know, everybody's work. And we needed to do this. American orchestra must have a big repertoire. 

小澤征爾 

ですから、受け継いだ伝統はしっかりとあって、オーケストラの演奏の幅が広がってゆくんです。これって、僕だけの手柄ではないと思います。全員の成果です。そしてこれこそが、僕達にとって必要なものなのです。アメリカのオーケストラというものは、レパートリーは沢山無いといけませんから。 

 

Charlie Rose 

When you ... when you set out to achieve that, is it about teaching a new repertoire to an orchestra ... is it also about changing an orchestra? Players, as well as the mind-set of an orchestra? I mean, it's gotta be more than just saying, ''Well, from now on we're gonna focus on a different kind of repertoire.'' 

チャーリー・ローズ 

新しいレパートリーをオーケストラに教えるときというのは、オーケストラ自体を変えてゆくことになるんですか?演奏者全体、それから1個の楽団としての発想も変えてゆくことになるんですか?つまりですね、「それじゃあ今から、全く違うレパートリーに集中するようになるからね」などと、宣言する、それ以上のことをすることになるんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No. 

小澤征爾 

とんでもない、違います。 

 

Charlie Rose 

No? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

違うんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

It doesn't work that way. You know, the orchestra members, you know, remind you, 100 musician or 99 musician ... 

小澤征爾 

そんなやり方をしたら、うまくいきません。よろしいですか、オーケストラのメンバーというのは、100人、正確には99人の… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... Boston Symphony. Everybody come from different school, even different country now, you know? 

小澤征爾 

ボストン交響楽団、それぞれ出身の音楽学校も、出身国も違います。そうですよね? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And different school, different mind. So, it's ... everybody has a different idea, but when conductor comes to show which direction this piece, this conductor ... let's say, me ... I think this, this way. They try to be together, and so everything is done so sensitive thing. I cannot say, ''This style must be heavy German style.'' No. Doesn't work that way.  

小澤征爾 

学んだ学校が違って、考え方が違って、それぞれが違う考え方を持っているんです。なのに、指揮者が来て、この曲の方向性は、この指揮者は、例えば僕が来て、このやり方で、とか、そうなると、メンバー達は一つにまとまろうとしてくれるんですよ。ですから、一つ一つ、やること全てが、気を遣うんです。「これは絶対重厚なドイツ系の音楽だ」とか、僕は絶対言えません。そんなやり方をしたら、うまくいきませんから。 

 

We have to slowly to make... I show. They show what they think. I show what I think. And then combination with ... I remind you. Conductor, no conductor makes sound, you know? Except some noise. 

僕達はゆっくり作っていかないと行けないんです。僕が示すもの、メンバー達が示すもの、僕の考えを示して、そうやって組み合わせていく中で…だいたいですね、指揮者なんて、何の音も発信しないじゃないですか、変な雑音を立てるだけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そりゃそうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

They make. So, it's wonderful, this combination of ...like, big ship moving ... 

小澤征爾 

音を発信するのはメンバー達です。ですから、この組み合わせ方が素晴らしいものになってゆく…丁度大きな船が動き出すようにですね… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Slowly. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ゆっくりとですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... or this way. And that's wonderful thing. It mix, and then come out one thing. And audience hear one, but inside it's many different things. And it's-- I think it's a wonderful thing. 

小澤征爾 

そういうことです。これって、素晴らしいことなんですよ。混ざりあって、一つのものが出来上がる。一つになったものをお客さんが聴く。でもその中身は、色々異なるものが沢山組み合わさったものなんです。そしてこれこそが、僕達の演奏の素晴らしさだと思っています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Is it good for an orchestra to have one conductor for so long? Is it good for a conductor to stay with one orchestra so long? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

オーケストラにとって、1人の指揮者が長期間いるというのは、良いことなんですか?指揮者にとって、1つのオーケストラに長くとどまるというのは、良いことなんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You have to ask my orchestra if it's good to have a long orchestra. But for me, my type is I stay long, one area, and then work slowly and grew up with group. You know, I really grew up with Boston Symphony.  

小澤征爾 

それは楽団に訊いてほしいですね。でも僕にとっては、僕みたいな人間にとっては、1つのところに長く居て、少しずつゆっくり仕事をして、楽団と一緒に成長してゆく、僕は本当に、ボストン交響楽団とともに成長したんです。 

 

I learn so many things while I'm working. And I was lucky because of my Maestro von Karajan, I ... before I came to Boston I was conducting every year one or two, even three programs in Berlin, and then also studied in Salzburg in opera and also the conducting Vienna Philharmonic.  

ここで指揮者をしている間に、本当にたくさんのことを学びました。そして僕は幸運なことに、カラヤン先生のおかげで…僕はボストン交響楽団に来る前は、毎年1,2回、場合によっては3回、ベルリン・フィルのプログラムをやらせてもらっていました。それから、ザルツブルクでオペラを勉強させてもらったりい、ウィーン・フィルハーモニー管弦楽団の指揮もさせてもらいました。 

 

And all ... this is why I conducted many European orchestras and Boston Symphony, many programs every year.  

これ全部…このおかげで、ヨーロッパのオーケストラを沢山指揮させてもらったおかげで、ボストン交響楽団で、毎年沢山の曲をプログラムに挙げることができるわけです。 

 

I remind you, Tanglewood is our summer home in Berkshire. Every year we have eight weeks, Act program, and we live together there -- you know? 

ご存知ですよね、マサチューセッツ州バークシャー郡にあるタングルウッド、ここがボストン交響楽団の夏の家のようなものです。毎年8週間ここで一緒に生活をするんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

We share same grocery shop and same lake. We lived so ... we really ... I really become part of family. That's for me is wonderful. For orchestra, you know, now because of, I think, airplane or because of CD. You go shop ... 

小澤征爾 

おなじ食料品店を利用して、同じ湖の畔に滞在して、生活をともにして、 僕は本当の家族の一員になる、そんな感じです。僕にとってはこれがすごく良いんです。オーケストラにとっても、今はCDもあるし、飛行機もあるし、CDなんてどこでも買えるし… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Sure. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... You can buy anything now. Or any conductor you can fly in. Right? Technically it's true. So ... But still one conductor stay. It's one area, and then many great guest conductor comes. Like food. You know? It's like, you like have this food and that food, but major ... I don't know. You ... half of your question I can answer. And half I cannot answer. 

小澤征爾 

何でも買って手に入ります。指揮者も、飛行機でひとっ飛びです。科学技術のおかげで、確かにそうなんですが、それでも1人の指揮者が1つのオーケストラに居て、大変な実力のある指揮者が、数多く振りに来る。毎日の食事と一緒ですよ。これも食べる、あれも食べる、でも1つ中心に据えるものがあって…わかりません。半分は僕が答えられますが、半分は僕にはわかりません。 

 

Charlie Rose 

That for you it's right to be there so you can live with and have and grow with and be part of a family? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それじゃあ、あなたにとっては、ボストン交響楽団というのは共に暮らし共に成長し家族の一員となるそれに相応しいということですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Only problem ... because I stay one area... 

小澤征爾 

1つだけ問題が…僕は1つの場所に居て… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Twenty-five years went so fast. 

小澤征爾 

25年間があっという間に過ぎてしまったこと、これが問題です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

It's so fast. Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

本当にあっという間に過ぎてしまったんですよ 

 

Charlie Rose 

I always ask this, and ... if you could play one last concert with your orchestra in Boston, one last concert, what would want to play? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

これ、いつも質問することなんですがもしあなたが、人生最後のコンサートをここボストン交響楽団行うとしたら演奏したい曲はなんですか 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

In my life? 

小澤征爾 

人生最後の、ですか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

In your life. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

人生最後のです 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Too bad that I cannot use whole orchestra. And whole orchestra I won't use because Boston Symphony is 99 musicians. 

小澤征爾 

これ言ってしまったら悪いかなオーケストラ全員要らない曲なんですよねボストン交響楽団99人いるのでね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But this piece only need about one third of Boston Symphony. But ''St. Matthew's Passion'' by Johann Sebastian Bach.  

小澤征爾 

でもこの曲は、ボストン交響楽団の1/3のメンバーで演奏する曲なんです。その曲とは、ヨハン・セバスティアン・バッハの「マタイ受難曲」ですね。 

 

That piece is something for me very special. If it is my last concert in my life. 

この曲は僕にとって、本当に特別な曲なんです。もし人生最後の、というなら、この曲です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That's all about Jesu, who suffer and finished ... kill. They killed him, then what is after. He suffer and this. But that's not very-- maybe not right because cannot use all my colleague. 

小澤征爾 

この曲はイエス・キリストの、受難と最後を描いた曲です…処刑されるところまでですね。イエスが処刑されて、その後、イエスの受難とかそういう曲です。でも、これは駄目だな、なにせメンバー全員が演奏に参加できないからな。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. You were ... you had ... you're OK now. You were sick for a while. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりました。ところで、最近しばらく体調を崩しておられましたよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No, I was sick. I had the flu. 

小澤征爾 

ええ、流行りの風邪に罹ってしまいましてね 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Like 'monia type of ... You know, this very new word for me. Och, I forgot already ...a type of flu... 'monia-like. 

小澤征爾 

気管支の炎症みたいな病気ですよ、なんだろう、僕には初めて聞く病名で、忘れちゃった、ナントカ炎みたいな感じです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Pneumonia, was it? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

肺炎でしょ? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You know? Last September. I went to Russia. 

小澤征爾 

去年の9月に、ロシアに行ったときなんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

One week with the Mstislav Rostovobich, he's my big brother. And he said, ''Seiji, we go Russia because of Japanese people and the Russian people must understand more and the culture is more important than politic and music is best.'' 

小澤征爾 

1週間ムスティスラフ・ロストロポーヴィチと一緒だったんです。彼は僕の兄貴分みたいなものです。彼がこう言ったんですよ「セイジ、一緒にロシアに行こう。日本の人達とロシアの人達は、お互い理解し合うことが必要だ。文化は政治なんかより大事だ。中でも音楽が一番だ。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そのとおりですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, he ask me. And big brother said, ''Seiji, come.'' So, I went with the Japanese Orchestra, a new Japan Philharmonic, one week right after Saito Kinen Festival, which is very good festival for me. You know, Saito is my professor's name. 

小澤征爾 

それで、彼が頼んできたんです。兄貴は「セイジ、来いよ」と言うんです。ですから日本のオーケストラ、新日本フィルハーモニー交響楽団と一緒に、サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルの丁度1週間後です。サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルは僕にとって大切な音楽祭なんですよ。サイトウは、齋藤秀雄先生のサイトウですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Saito Kinen Festival in Matsumoto in country. We went to Russia and have a concert very quickly, and then I took airplane, come back to Boston in airplane. I asked if temperature high. It was 'monia, like light 'monia. I forgot name of-- type of 'monia ... usually young people get, I understand, but I got it. 

小澤征爾 

サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルが松本で開催されて、ロシアに行って、コンサートを1回すぐに開いて、その後飛行機に飛び乗って、ボストンに戻る飛行機にの中で、あれ?熱があるかな?と思ったんです。何かの炎症、ナントカ炎みたいな、名前が思い出せないな、普通は若い人が罹るっ病気らしいですけど、でも僕が罹ってしまったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, about three weeks I was flat. I missed many things ... big ceremony of 25th anniversary concert  ... 

小澤征爾 

おかげで3週間寝たきりです。沢山キャンセルしないとならなくなって、その中には、25周年の記念コンサートもありましたし… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Who conducted was Robert Shaw, who died. 

小澤征爾 

代わりに、ロバート・ショーがやってくれました。最近(1999年)亡くなってしまいましたが。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Robert Shaw, yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ロバート・ショー、そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He's also dead now. But now I'm fine. 

小澤征爾 

彼は代役をしてくれましたが、今は亡くなってしまいました。僕はもう回復しています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

OK. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なによりです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Again I flu ... last two months ago I got the flu again. Everybody get flu. I said, ''I don't get flu because I had already a big one beginning of season.'' 

小澤征爾 

そして、2ヶ月前に、また流行りの風邪に罹ってしまったんです。風邪は誰もがひくものですが、僕はこう言ったんですよ「季節の頭にひどい風邪に罹ったから、罹らないと思っていた。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

You're now immune. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

今は免疫が出来ているでしょう。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I got. 

小澤征爾 

でも罹ってしまったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But I'm fine. 

小澤征爾 

今は大丈夫です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Great. It's an honor to have you here. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

良かったです。今日はお越しいただき、ありがとうございました。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Thank you. 

小澤征爾 

こちらこそ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Many more years with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and all that you do at Tanglewood and other places. A pleasure. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ボストン交響楽団でのご活躍、そしてタングルウッド、その他世界各地でのご活躍、今後も長く続きますよう、お祈りいたします。今日はありがとうございました。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Thank you. 

小澤征爾 

ありがとうございました。 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5ZxF8suhmY 

 

Hector Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Op.14 

サイトウ・キネン・オーケストラ 

指揮:小澤征爾 

英日対訳:マーレイド・ネスビット(愛蘭、Vn)2020WMUR:動き回る訳/アイルランド音楽の魅力

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-exwrt_eV_4 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Máiréad is interviewed by Erin Fehlau host and anchor on @WMUR  award winning news magazine New Hampshire Chronicle March 25th 2020.  

マーレイド・ネスビットへのインタビュー 

アンカー&聞き手:エリン・フェフラウ 

WMURテレビ 報道番組 

「ニュー・ハンプシャー・クロニクル」2020年3月25日放送分 

 

 

[Music] 

 

Erin Fehlau 

She leaps and twirls all without missing a note. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

このように、飛んだり跳ねたり、クルクル回っても、一つも音を間違えることはありません。 

 

Máiréad Nesbitt 

That's something I love. Myself, as a performer, is freedom of movement when I play. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

私自身、こうするのが大好きなんです。弾き手としては、自分が演奏する時は、自由に体が動き回れる、これなんです。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Celtic violinist Máiréad Nesbitt has toured the globe and now this famed fiddler from Ireland calls New Hampshire home.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

ケルティック・バイオリニスト」として活躍中の、マーレイド・ネスビットさん。世界を舞台に活躍中です。アイルランド出身の「フィドルの名人」は、ここニュー・ハンプシャーを「自分の住まい」と呼んでくれています。 

 

MN 

I'm so delighted to be here in New Hampshire because it reminds me so much of Ireland. It's like Ireland on a good day. It's so beautiful. The mountains and lakes, the trees. It really is like Ireland on quite a grand scale.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ここニュー・ハンプシャーに家を持つことが出来て、とても嬉しいです。ここにいるとアイルランドのことが、沢山思い出すことが出来るからです。古き良き日のアイルランド、て感じです。山が連なって、湖がそこかしこにあって、木々が茂って、広々としたアイルランド、そんな感じです。 

 

EF 

Mairead took to the stage in her new home state charming the crowd at the Buzz Ball. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女の新たなホームグラウンド「バズ・ボール」(ニュー・ハンプシャーコンコルド)のオーディエンスは、もうマーレイドさんに夢中です。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

She's seen the world performing first with “Lord of the Dance,” and then as a founding member of “Celtic Woman.” 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女はまず「Lord of the Dance」で舞台での本格的な演奏をスタートさせ、その後、「ケルティック・ウーマン」結成当初のメンバーとなります。 

 

MN 

Every album has been number one on the Billboard world music charts, and then my last album that I did with them was destiny. And that was nominated for the Grammy.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

リリースするアルバムが、どれもビルボード・チャートの世界ランキングトップに入って、そのあとメンバーと一緒に作った私の最新アルバムが、これが運命的でした。グラミー賞にもノミネートしていただきましたしね。 

 

EF 

The New York Times once called her “a demon of a fiddle player,” a title she embraces with pride.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

ニューヨーク・タイムズ」が、かつて彼女を「悪魔のフィドル奏者」と書いたことがあります。彼女はこれを誇りに思っているとのことです。 

 

MN 

I take that as a huge compliment. I think what they meant, well, what I took from us, is that I think it might have been my movement, and also the way I play like when I hone in on something I really try and grasp it. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

これは私にとっては、スゴイ褒め言葉です。私が舞台上で動き回れる様子のこを、多分言っているんでしょう。それと、本気で取り組んで自分のものにしようとする、そういうものを研ぎ澄まそうとする、そんな演奏の仕方のことを言っているんだと思います。 

 

There's a word in Ireland called “a dervish,” and a “dervish” is a twirling spirit, you know. And I think maybe it was a little bit of that too. 

アイルランドには「デーヴィシュ」という言葉があります。クルクル回りながらさまよう精霊のことです。そんなものも、私にとっては感じ取れます。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

How she's able to dance and play is a real wonder she's often asked,  

エリン・フェフラウ 

踊りながら、楽器もきちんと弾く、一体どうやったらできるのか、彼女は良くその質問を受けています。 

 

MN 

“How do you not get your hair caught in the strings?” And, “Yes, it does get caught sometimes.” But you know, and I think for me again, movement is an extension of the music. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

「髪の毛が弦に絡まないんですか?」なんて訊かれます。「絡むこともありますよ」て答えてます。同じことを言うようですが、私が舞台上で体を動かすのは、自分の中にある音楽を表現しようとして、それが外に膨らみ出ている、その結果だと考えています。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Mairead has played at the White House and entertained for presidents. Her parents, both music educators, instilled a love of music and their children.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

これまでマーレイドさんは、ホワイトハウスで、4人の大統領の前で演奏しています。両親は二人共音楽の先生で、音楽を愛する気持ち、そしてご両親の子供達を愛する気持ちを、注いできました。 

 

MN 

We grew up breathing music really.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

私達にとって音楽は、空気みたいに、呼吸しながら育ってきたものです。 

 

EF 

Both she and her sister were named All Ireland fiddle champions at a young age.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

一家には二人の娘が居て、二人共アイルランドでは、フィドルの大会で全国優勝を幼い頃に果たしています。 

 

MN 

Playing music with them all the time was just the most fantastic upbringing, really. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

家族とずっと、四六時中音楽をとにかくしている、これって本当に素晴ららしい大人への成長の仕方だと思いましたね。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Her family, which has recorded an albumtogether in the Irish cottage where she grew up, is filled with accomplished musicians.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

家族総出で、アイルランドの伝統的なコテージを録音場所にして、レコードアルバムを1枚出しています。こちらの家族は全員が、ひとかどのミュージシャン達なのです。 

 

MN 

It's a great resource for me, actually. “Can you play with me in something?” such thing. “Can you arrange this for me?” “Can you do this for me?” 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

家族が、自分の音楽活動に役に立ってくれるなんて、本当に素晴らしいと思っています。「チョッと一緒に弾いてくれないかな?」とか「これ譜面起こしてくれないかな」とか「これチョッとやってくれないかな?」とか。 

 

EF 

Mairead has even appeared on the Great White Way. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女はブロードウェイにも進出を果たしています。 

 

(interview) 

 

EF 

You're on Broadway.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

今やブロードウェイのアーティストですからね。 

 

MN 

Yes. Broadway was such ... it was such an experience, really, really fantastic. I was on Broadway with a spectacular rock show called “Rock Topia.”  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

そうなんです。ブロードウェイって、その…もう本当に、物凄い素晴らしい経験をさせていただきました。「ロック・トピア」という、すごいロック音楽のステージに出させていただいたんです。 

 

And it's easily the hardest thing I had to play. That's the first thing I'll say. But Broadway itself for nine weeks was 

absolutely incredible. 

当然今までで、一番キツい本番でしたよ。初めて、といってもいいことでしたから。でも、ブロードウェイで過ごした2ヶ月チョットは、何から何までスゴかったです。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Throughout the years she's collaborated with some well-known musicians. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

これまでの演奏活動で、著名なミュージシャン達とのコラボレーションも行ってきています。 

 

MN 

Van Morrison, Sinead O'Connor, then over here in the States, I've played with a lot of musicians here like Pat Monahan of “Train,” and even Dee Snider who's Twisted Sister. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ヴァン・モリソンにシネード・オコナー、アメリカに来てからは「トレイン」のパット・モナハンと、それから「トゥイステッド・シスター」のディー・スナイダーとも! 

 

[Music] 

 

MN 

This particular violin is over 300 years old, actually 314 years old.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

例えばこのバイオリンなんかだと、300年くらい前のものです。正確には314年前のものですね。 

 

EF (interview) 

Are you serious?! 

エリン・フェフラウ 

マジですか? 

 

MN 

Yes. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

そうよ。 

 

EF (interview) 

As a kid? For pocket money? 

エリン・フェフラウ 

それをまだ小さい頃に、お小遣いで買ったという? 

 

EN 

I used to warm up fiddles for this violin dealer, and I'd have to give it back after two months after, after, you know, opening up the sound.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

このバイオリンを管理していたディーラーさんから、楽器を預かって、音が劣化しないように弾く、そういうことを、私はやっていたんです。2ヶ月位それをしたあとで、音がしっかり通るようになったんですね。 

 

And he said, “Keep this. You can keep it.” So I've had this since I was 14. 

そうしたらディーラーさんから「それ、君が使っていいよ」て言ってくれたんです。ですから14歳の時から、この楽器です。 

 

EF 

Now Mairead has her own line of violins and bows.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

現在マーレイドさんは、ご自身のブランドの楽器と弓をお持ちです。 

 

MN 

I've always wanted my name in a bow. Erin, you know, I'll have to bring you one.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ずっと自分の名前が入った弓を使いたかったんですよ。そうしたらエリンさんのも、今度持ってきますよ。 

 

EF (interview) 

Now, I need to .. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

いやあ、そうしたら… 

 

MN 

I go through. I need your address. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

本当よ。送り先住所教えてね。 

 

EF (interview) 

I need a lesson. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

そしたらレッスンしてもらわないと。 

 

MN 

Well, I do! You do! Well, I'll do start the lesson as well! 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

勿論、やりますよ、よろしくね!レッスンもついでに始めようね! 

 

EF (interview) 

Yes, absolutely! 

エリン・フェフラウ 

当然、よろしくね! 

 

**** 

 

EF (interview) 

Playing professionally since she was a wee lass, Mairead has not only mastered the traditional jigs and reels, but she's also an accomplished classical musician. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

「可愛いお嬢ちゃん」なんて言われていたころから、プロとして活動してきたマーレイドさんですが、名人級の腕前は、アイルランドの伝統的な「ジグ」や「リール」ばかりでなく、クラシック音楽も完璧です。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

This talent from the Emerald Isle, bringing the songs of her homeland to her new neighbors here in the Granite State.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

「緑滴るエメラルドの島」アイルランドの逸材は、「花崗岩がゴロゴロする人里」ニュー・ハンプシャーに、故郷アイルランドの数々の音楽をもたらそうとしています。 

 

MN 

And I think with Irish music the world over, it doesn't really matter what background you're from. It doesn't matter what genre you're in. Everybody loves a beautiful Irish melody. Everybody does. And they don't know why they love. They just do. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

アイルランドの伝統的な音楽は、世界中で聴いていただいても、聞く方がどんなバックグラウンドをお持ちでも、楽しんでいただけると思っています。ご自分がどんなジャンル音楽がお好きでも、楽しんでいただけると思っています。アイルランド音楽のメロディの美しさは、どんな方にも好きになってもらえると思っています。その理由を実感することはないにせよ、とにかく好きになってもらえると思っています。 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0ZNXxPP10I 

 

Celtic Woman - Danny Boy (Live At Morris Performing Arts Center, South Bend, IN /2013) 

英日対訳:カーチュン・ウォン(新加坡・指揮)2020演奏会前説:ゴメンな、ショスタコーヴィッチ!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT5tly4U1lQ 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

(Pre-Concert Talk) 

The internationally acclaimed Kahchun Wong, talks about the 20th century Russian master's remarkable Chamber Symphony. 

2020/09/25 

黃佳俊 

世界を舞台に活躍中のカーチュンウォンが、20世紀ロシアを代表する作曲家ドミトリー・ショスタコーヴィッチの「室内交響曲について、オンラインコンサートに向けてのプレトークで語ります。 

 

You can hear it really in the music, you know, it's ... I mean, a lot of people, reports are saying it's autobiographical.  

曲を聞くとおわかりいただけると思いますが…多くの人、記録なんかにもありますように、この曲は、作曲者自身の人生を描いている、ということです。 

 

A lot of people are linking it to the fact that he wrote it in three days - 1960, which is also the year he joined the Communist Party.  

作曲者はこの曲を3日間で書き上げました。1960年のことです。この年は共産党入党の年でもあります。このことと関係がある、そう思う人も多いかと思います。 

 

And he wrote his String Quartet No. 8 which is the basis for this version by (Rudolf) Barshai, and Shostakovich himself has heard this music.  

ショスタコーヴィチ弦楽四重奏曲第8番を書いています。今回演奏するルドルフ・バルシャイの編曲版の元となった曲です。今回の編曲版は、ショスタコーヴィチ自身も聞いています。 

 

And he ... in some reports, it's suggested that he said “This was even better than the string quartet version.” 

ある文献によると作曲者はこう言ったとされていますこれは弦楽四重奏曲バージョンよりも良かったぞ。」 

 

Today on stage we have 4 first violins, 4 second, 4 violas, 3 cellos, 2 basses. So it's a very reduced string orchestra.  

日舞台上には第1バイオリンが4人第2バイオリン4人ビオラ4人チェロが3人コントラバス2人ですまあ、弦楽オーケストラ、と呼ぶには規模は小さめにしてあります 

 

It's also not the kind of Singapore Symphony that audiences are usually used to because we have usually 14 first violin to 16 first violins.  

普段お客様方おなじみのシンガポール交響楽団とは、ちょっと違った感じですね。普段は第1バイオリンが14人とか16人とかいますから。 

 

But at the same time I think with the context of this music, that it has been so powerful with just four in its original quartet version.  

ですが同時にですね、今回第1バイオリンが4人しかいませんが、この音楽の作り方を考えると、大本の弦楽四重奏曲版の持つ力強さが出ています。 

 

Now that we have a slightly enlarged string orchestra, I think we still keep very much this musical continuity and the context of this piece itself. 

弦楽四重奏よりは少しだけ規模を大きくした、そんな感じの今回の弦楽オーケストラですが、この曲の持つ音楽性は受け継がれていますし、曲の作り方も受け継がれています。 

 

It's a very strange piece. I was very intrigued by it. The first time I heard it was a recording by the Borodin Quartet, and it has so much, musically, that's painful, melancholic, but at the same time it's also very calculated.  

この曲は、本当に一風変わった作品です。とても興味深いな、僕はそう思いました。初めてこの曲を聞いたのは、ボロディン弦楽四重奏団の音源です。この音源の演奏は、音楽的にとても豊かです。痛々しくて、物憂げで、でも同時に、ものすごく計算されていることがわかります。 

 

You know, it's really a kind of contrast between the free and also the restrained.  

ある意味、自由気ままさと、すごい堅苦しさと、そのコントラストがハッキリしています。 

 

*********** 

 

It begins in the first movement, (there are) five of them, in the first movement almost a kind of quasi-fuga. You have these canonic entrances, not very regular, singing his name "Re-Mi-Do-Si" which is D-Es-C-H. "Es" for E-flat and “H” for B-natural, and so they play Re-Mi (E-flat)-Do-Si B-natural, which is sort of "DSCH", his signature, his name - "Dmitri Schostakowitsch." 

第1楽章、この曲は5つの楽章があって、最初の楽章は、フーガっぽいものです。輪唱、カノンのような出だしで、そんなに規則性がハッキリしているものではありません。作曲者の名前を歌っているんですよ。「レ、ミ、ド、シ」これって、ドイツ語では「D(デー)Es(エス)C(ツェー)H(ハー)」といいます。「エス」とは「ミ」のフラット、「ハー」とは「シ」のナチュラル。「DSCH」と並んだ感じで、作曲者の名前「Dドミトリー・SショスタコーヴィチCH」となるでしょ? 

 

And everyone is murmuring the name from the cellos, basses to violas, second violins, first violins, and then everyone whispers it very pianissimo, senza vibrato.  

舞台にいる一人一人の奏者が、彼の名前をブツブツと呟くんですよ。まずはチェロ、コントラバス、そしてビオラ、第2バイオリン、第1バイオリンと続きます。それぞれがうんと小さな音、pp(ピアニッシモ)で、ヴィブラートはかけません。 

 

So you can feel this very tense, very unsettling atmosphere. Here with the SSO (Singapore Symphony Orchestra), we've tried to do this in three different ways.  

そうやって、この物凄く張り詰めた、落ち着かない雰囲気を作るのです。今回シンガポール交響楽団では、これを3つの異なる方法でやってみました。 

 

It's the music (which is) absolutely the same - pianissimo. But the first time we played on the A-string, senza vibrato, so a very brittle sound, and then the second time we move it to D-string and so it's a little bit higher positioned but con vibrato but still pianissimo.  

音楽はそのまま、pp(ピアニッシモ)です。ですが1回目は「A」の弦を使うのです。ヴィブラートはかけません。ドライで、ちょっとのはずみで崩れてしまいそうな音になります。2回目は「D」の弦を使います。少しだけ高い位置になりますが、今度はヴィブラートをかけて、でも音量はpp(ピアニッシモ)のままです。 

 

So now you hear this darker sounds but with a more weeping, sad singing, mournful kind of music.  

そうやって音色が濃い目で、更に涙をにじませるような、悲しげに歌うような、うめくような感じの音楽になります。 

 

And then the third time. When it appears, it starts with an E-natural so we play it on the E-string, which in most cases, violinists don't really like to play on open string in a kind of music like this because it's so bright and out of place.  

そして3回目です。今度は出だしがEナチュラルですので「E」の弦を使います。多くの場合、バイオリン奏者は開放弦を使って、この手の音楽を弾くのは、あまり好みません。なぜなら「開けっぴろげ」みたいな明るさを音が持ってしまって、物凄く場違いな感じになってしまうからです。 

 

But in this circumstance, I just thought it works very well and the SSO violinists are so cooperative in exploring this idea, so I think we're going to get a very nice result out of that.  

でも今回この場合に限って、この方がうまくいくと、僕は考えました。シンガポール交響楽団のバイオリン奏者の皆さんが、すごく協力してくれて、どうやったら僕のアイデアを実現できるか、模索してくれたんです。素晴らしい結果になると思っています。 

 

And of course this piece has a lot of solos. You have in the first movement, Yoong-Han playing a very beautiful entrance just a whisper. 

そうそう、この曲にはソロが沢山出てきます。第1楽章ではユン・ハンさんが、曲の出だしで、ものすごく美しい、丁度人間がささやくような演奏を聞かせてくれます。 

 

In a whole the first movement is like a prelude, fuga, canonic, calculated but also scary.  

第1楽章全体をもう一度おさらいしますと、前奏があって、フーガが続いて、カノンと、計算されつくされて、でも同時に怖い感じもします。 

 

******** 

 

And then it leads into the second movement which is a very fast, relentless, powerful [sings] very chromatic. Every part shines, you know, the violas play very important music, the second violins, and the cellos. 

このことは第2楽章にも引き継がれます。今度はものすごくスピード感があって、矢継ぎ早で、力強くて(歌ってみせる)、半音階でも聴いているかのような感じを強くうけます。どのパートもピカピカと光を放っているようです。ビオラがとても重要な部分を弾きます。あと、第2バイオリンとチェロもね。 

 

It starts as 8-bar phrases and then it goes into 4+3+2. Then he comes back with these bunches but it's seven bars long. So just thinking about this makes me very alert.  

出だしは8小節一区切りのフレーズ、次に4,3,2小節という区切り方のフレーズになります。そしてまたこのフレーズの区切り方に戻るのですが、小節数は7つになります。こうなると、僕も落ち着かない気分になります。 

 

I feel like I'm back to JC (Junior College) and studying all my A-Mathe (Additional Mathematics) and all that. It's very calculative, really makes me think about structure and phrases.  

なんだか中学校の時の「数学追補」という科目をやっていたときのことを思い出しますよ。曲が数学の計算でもやっているような気分になります。全体の構造や各フレーズのことを、ウンと考えさせられる曲です。 

 

And when I sort of try to understand this a little bit more, it really puts into context the kind of academic rigour that Shostakovich has placed into his music. It's nothing comfortable. It throws people off.  

なんでかな?と少しでも理解しようと思ったら、ある意味、難しい学問的な厳しさを、ショスタコーヴィチは自分の音楽に反映させたんだ、というそういう作り方だと判ったんです。心地よさなんて、全然ありません。人を突き放す、そんな感じです。 

 

And I think Shostakovich has been quoted to say that “This kind of Jewish dance music, folk music means a lot to him,” or “meant a lot.”  

たしかショスタコーヴィチが言った言葉だと思うんですが「この手のユダヤの舞曲だの、民族音楽だのというものは、私にとって大いに意味がある」、あれ?、「あった」だったかな。 

 

It really evoked some kind of emotion in him because it sounds, on the surface, very happy but it's full of despair and maybe this reflects the kind of history the Jews have all these thousands of years.  

作曲者の心のなかにある、何かしらの思いが、ものすごく出ています。というのも、表面的には、とても楽しげですよね。でも絶望感が満載で、これは数千年にも亘るユダヤ人の歴史みたいなものを、映し出しているんじゃないでしょうかね。 

 

And that's how he ends his second movement with this molto perpetuo, this constant drive with this dance.  

第2楽章は「Molto Perpetuo」、つまり、この踊りの音楽が、ずっと続くような感じで締めくくられます。 

 

*********** 

 

Then we move on to the third movement, which is one of my favourite Shostakovich little pieces, you know,  because it's a waltz and he does this kind of dances very well. You have also the second movement of the Fifth Symphony as well [sings] 

次は第3楽章です。僕の大好きな、ショスタコーヴィチの小さめの曲の中の一つなんです。これはワルツで、作曲者はこの手の踊りの音楽を、とても上手に使います。僕が好きな理由はそこにあります。これは交響曲第5番の第2楽章にも出てきます(歌ってみせる)。 

 

These kind of things are very sarcastic, very painful. It's almost like laughing at himself and being self-critical. It's kind of like limping with the waltz, you know, we're dancing.  

この手の音楽は、白々しさと、痛々しさで満ち溢れています。作曲者が自分自身を、あざ笑っているような感じです。ワルツに合わせて、ヨタヨタして、そんな感じで踊っているのです。 

 

So we feel like we have a dance partner and we're moving along and suddenly the dance partner just throws you aside or steps on your foot. You have this uneasiness with this Shostakovich. 

一緒に踊る相手が居て、踊っている途中で、いきなり突き放されて、しかも足まで踏まれて、そんな感じがします。ショスタコーヴィチの書いたこの部分には、安心感がまるで無い、そんな雰囲気があるのです。 

 

And then it goes into something very special, which is the First Cello Concerto, theme of the Cello Concerto [sings], which was also written very close to 1960, close to when this piece was first composed.  

次に、ここは特別な部分です。チェロ協奏曲第1番の主題を彷彿とさせる部分です。チェロ協奏曲第1番も、1960年頃に書かれた曲です。今回の曲の原曲が作られた頃ですね。 

 

There is a very big cello solo, very Shostakovich kind of melody. You have ... It's diatonic but very chromatic and sometimes he uses the flat second, the flat sixth and all that. Very Shostakovich kind of construction.  

第3楽章にはチェロの長いソロが出てきます。ショスタコーヴィチ特有の感じがするメロディです。譜面は全音階なのに、まるで半音階でも聴いているかのような感じが強くします。それは第2音を時々半音下げているからです。あと第6音も。まさにショスタコーヴィチの曲の作り方、というやつです。 

 

************ 

 

Then you have the fourth movement which is the most powerful thing. The climax of this piece. 

次に第4楽章です。この曲で一番パワフルな部分で、曲が最高潮に盛り上がるところです。 

 

So we have five movements, it just happens at the fourth movement again. This whole golden ratio around the 66 - 70% kind of thing.  

全部で5つの楽章ですが、普通の交響曲と同じように、第4楽章が山場になるんですね。この黄金比といいますか、6割6分から7割、といったところでしょうか。 

 

And it's very powerful because it's not loud, it's not fast, it's not kind of triumphant like how we think, “OK, the climax should be in the finale.” 

パワフルに感じるのは、音量がバカでかくなく、せかせか急ぐでなく、勝ち誇った感じでもない、「ヨッシャ、曲の山場なんだから、ここでおしまいだ!」でもない、だからこそパワフルに感じるのです。 

 

But he does give us something loud - its this effect of [knocks] 

ただ、バカでかい要素が一つあります。これ(譜面台をゲンコツで叩く) 

 

You know, someone like the KGB or some loan shark, or just someone at the door just knocking.  

ロシアの秘密警察KGBか、それともヤミ金融の取り立てか、とにかく誰かがドアをガンガン叩く、そんな感じのフレーズです。 

 

And the tempo is quite fast, It's 138. So it should be [sings].  I just thought especially with a smaller string section, getting a slower tempo gives slightly more time to make that sound and also to make it more threatening so we're trying to do it slightly slower. Sorry Shostakovich! But I think it gets that feeling out.  

テンポはとにかく速い、138です。こんな感じで(歌ってみせる)。ただ僕は、作曲者の指定よりも、楽器群の規模を縮小して、テンポもちょっとだけ遅めにして、時間を掛けて弾いた方が、強迫観念が強まるかな、と思って、ちょっとだけ遅めにやりました。ゴメンな、ショスタコーヴィチさん!でもこの方が、曲の感じが出ていると思いますよ。 

 

So you have this two contrasts in this movement, right? It starts with this knocking, it's a 3-bar phrase. And then you have [sings] and then 3-bar phrase. But it's singing. It's not short.  

ということで、この楽章では2つの対比が付きましたね。ドアをガンガン叩くような、これは3小節一区切りのフレーズです。次にこのフレーズ(歌ってみせる)これも3小節一区切りの、でもしっかり歌い上げる、短いフレーズではないからです。 

 

So [sings] is short but then [sings] is very long, very horizontal and full of vibrato, a really wide vibrato that we are asking the musicians to play, together.  

これは短く(歌ってみせる)、これは長く(歌ってみせる)、横の流れを大事にして、ヴィブラートも思いっきり、豪快に掛けて、奏者全員で一体感を出して、とお願いしています。 

 

So you have this crying and weeping part and then you have this guy at the door saying, "Come out - it's your time". 

この大声を張り上げるような、涙をにじませるような、そんな部分になっていて、これって作曲者が、例えばドアの向こうで「ほら、来いよ、お前が出てくる時なんだぞ」と言っているようです。 

 

Then the cello plays this very brittle, transparent, translucent kind of music.  

続いてチェロが、触ったら崩れそうな、透明感のある、それに近い感じの演奏をします。 

 

You have the feeling that it's an “íng hún chū qiào.”  There's just one wisp of smoke going up into the air and you're looking down on people. There's really this kind of spooky effect. And it's the Seventh Month! 

幽体離脱」、そんな雰囲気があるのです。細い煙のすじが、上に上がっていって、人々を上から見下ろす、薄気味悪い感じが出る効果があります。そう言えば今は「盂蘭盆会」の時期でしたね!幽霊もでますわ! 

 

************ 

 

Then it goes into the fifth movement. But this is almost, you know, if the beginning, if the first movement is like an opening or preface, this is like the prologue, then this is like the epilogue, the ending of it all.  

そして第5楽章へと進みます。ただここはですね、第1楽章を、「オープニング」とか「前書き」とか言って、「前説」とするなら、この第5楽章は「エピローグ」、つまり曲全体の「後書き」ですね。 

 

What is really special is that at the very end, we decided to have ... at a certain spot near the end, just the four quartet musicians playing. The principal players of the SSO are playing. That really goes back to the original quartet version.... D-S-C-H... 

今回特別に、曲の最後の最後の部分で、私達はですね…ある部分で、終わりのところですが、弦楽四重奏団みたいに、4人だけで演奏しています。シンガポール交響楽団の首席奏者の4人です。まさしく、大本の弦楽四重奏曲版ですね。メロディも「DSCH」と並んだ感じが、また出てきます。 

 

We get this very intimate kind of sound, almost like autobiographical and just dying down before the whole orchestra comes back for one final "re -mi-do-si" 

この間近で一対一で聴いているような感じのサウンドは、作曲者の人生を綴ったような、少しずつ消え去ってゆくような、そしてオーケストラ全体が、また「DSCH」と並んだ感じのフレーズを、今度こそ最後に弾きます。 

 

So you hear this perfect fifth at the very end. And this perfect fifth is also a kind of idea which you can find everywhere in this work. It's very empty. 

一番最後に完全5度の音が聞こえてきます。この完全5度を使うやり方は、この曲の色々なところに出てきます。音の密度が薄く、空っぽな感じがします。 

 

The perfect fifth is so resonant. You know, “Do-So.” It's such a common interval. Very resonant, but at the same time empty. 

この完全5度というのは、ものすごく良く響く組み合わせです。「ド・ソ」。よく知られている音の重ね方ですよね。ものすごく良く響きます。同時に、空っぽな感じがします。 

 

You know, you hear ... if you think about the harmonic series, you have “Do,” if it's C, “Do-Do.” And even “So.” 

倍音を並べてみましょう。「ド」、なら「ド-ド」となりますし、あるいは「ソ」でもいいですけど。 

 

But from this, the human ear interprets this as a major. We almost hear the third, the major third.  

ただこのことから、人間の耳というのは、こんな風に音を重ねると、長調の和音を鳴らしているように聞こえます。うまくすれば、第3音、長調の和音の第3音が聞こえてきます。 

 

But in Shostakovich's case, he doesn't put in a minor third so he doesn't say this is a minor chord.  

ところがショスタコーヴィチは、この曲では短調の第3音を譜面には書いていないのです。「これは短調の和音だ」とは、言っていないのです。 

 

But because he removes it, and because in the context of the whole music, you hear this and you hear the fifth as such a sad, painful, empty kind of a dyad, a kind of chord if you will. You can hear almost the minor third there. It's really quite a remarkable thing. 

作曲者は第3音を敢えて取り除いて、それは曲全体の作り方からですね、そうすることで、聞こえてくるんですよ、第5音が、悲しげで、痛々しくて、空っぽな感じがします。2つの音で構成される和音、ある意味和音ですよね、これも。短調の第3音が聞こえてくる感じがするんですよ。これは、本当にスゴイことです。 

 

********* 

 

Hello! My name is Kahchun. Nice to see you all again. I'm hoping to welcome you to our concert which is going to be on SISTIC Live and it features three pieces of music. 

こんにちは、カーチュンと申します!皆さん、またお目にかかれましたね!僕達シンガポール交響楽団は、「SISTC Live」のオンラインコンサートを開催いたします。是非御覧ください。今回は3曲演奏します。 

 

Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, which has SSO Principal Flute Jin Ta on flute solo.  

ドビュッシー作曲の「牧神の午後への前奏曲」。シンガポール交響楽団の我らが主席フルート奏者、ジン・タがソロを務めます。 

 

There's also Wagner's “Siegfried Idyll” in its original version for 13 instruments.  

次にワーグナー作曲「ジークフリート牧歌」。原曲の13人の奏者でお送りいたします。 

 

And also Shostakovich's Chamber Symphony, which is actually a version by Barshai on his original Eighth String Quartet. 

そして勿論、ショスタコーヴィチ作曲「室内交響曲」。原曲は弦楽四重奏曲ですが、今回はルドルフ・バルシャイの弦楽オーケストラ版でお送りいたします。 

 

So see you! 

待ってますよ! 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4OnE9uXHvY 

 

本番の見事な演奏です 

 

DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH (1906–1975) 

Chamber Symphony, Op. 110a (String Quartet No. 8, arr. Barshai, 1960) 

 

0:00 I. Largo 

5:29 II. Allegro molto 

8:45 III. Allegretto 

13:40 IV. Largo 

19:20 V. Largo 

 

Singapore Symphony Orchestra 

Kahchun Wong, conductor 

 

Recorded on 24 Aug 2020 at the Esplanade Concert Hall, Singapore 

 

英日対訳:エヴァ・ポドレス(波蘭・Alto)2010インタビュー:ベテランの流儀「今が最高」で行く

https://www.polskieradio.pl/395/7791/Artykul/3324101,focus-the-contralto 

スクリプトの音声サイトはこちらからどうぞ 

 

Ewa Podles - interview - 2010 

Polskie Radio 

エヴァ・ポドレス アルト歌手(コントラルト) 

国営ポーランド・ラジオ 2023年1月24日 

 

Elzbieta Krajewska 

Welcome to “Focus Magazine,” and your host is Elzbieta Krajewska. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

「フォーカス・マガジン」へようこそ。ご案内役のエリザベータ・クライェフスカです。 

 

Ewa Podles, or one of our greatest Polish singers of her generation and owner of extraordinary rare voice passed away on January 19th, 2024 at the age of 71. 

我が国が誇るポーランドの歌手エヴァ・ポドレス、とても素晴らしい、類まれな美声の持ち主でしたが、2024年1月19日、71歳でこの世を去りました。 

 

Her distinctive dramatic voice of staggering range was hailed as the most authentic of contraltos, “Contralto Assoluto,” as she came to be titled.  

彼女独特のドラマチックな美声は、圧倒的な程の音域の幅を誇り、本格的な最高のコントラルト歌手としての「コントラルト・アッソルート」の称号を誇りました。 

 

And her artistic achievement spanned several decades, seeing her career that took her to all the great theaters and the world, including The Metropolitan Opera, Teatro Alla Scala, The Royal Opera House, Teatro Real, and Grand Theatre d'Anger, and of course, The National Stages in Poland. 

数十年にも及び輝かしい実績を残した彼女の音楽家人生のなかで、世界を代表する歌劇場の殆どの舞台に立ちました。ニューヨークのメトロポリタン歌劇場、ミラノのスカラ座、ロンドンのロイヤル・オペラ・ハウス、マドリードのテアトロ・レアル、フランスのアンジェ大劇場、そして勿論、ポーランド国内の各国公立劇場には、全て彼女が登場しています。 

 

(music) 

       

Born on the April 26th, 1952 in Warsaw, Ewa Podles studied at The Warsaw Academy of Music and Alina Bolechowska, and made her stage debut as “Rosina” in Rossini's “Barbar in Seville” in 1975.  

エヴァ・ポドレスは1952年4月26日生まれ、ワルシャワ音楽アカデミー(現在の国立フレデリック・ショパン音楽大学)でアリーナ・ブレホススカに師事、その後1975年に、ロッシーニ作曲の歌劇「セヴィリアの理髪師」で、ロジーナ役を演じてデビューを果たしました。 

 

And in 1984 she made her The Metropolitan Opera debut, singing the title role in Handel's “Rinaldo.” She sang with accompaniment of world famous orchestras and accompanied by her husband Jerzy Marchwinski (whom) she traveled with recitals world-wide.  

1984年にはメトロポリタン歌劇場で、ヘンデル作曲の歌劇「リナルド」で、リナルド役を演じます。また、世界の主要オーケストラとの共演や、ピアノ奏者で夫のイェルジ・マルチウィンスキとともに、世界各地でリサイタルを開催しました。 

 

In 2010, I had a great honor and pleasure of meeting and talking to Ewa Podles.  

2010年には私、エリザベータ・クライェフスカが、直接お会いしてのインタビューが実現しました。 

 

*************** 

 

I had the honor of meeting Ewa Podles at her house near Warsaw before the premiere of (Richard) Strauss's “Elektra” at The National Opera. We talked under the portrait of her as “Rinaldo” and the company of a vocal of canary.    

首都郊外のエヴァ・ポドレスさんのご自宅にお邪魔して、近くワルシャワ大劇場での初演が予定されております、リヒャルト・シュトラウスの歌劇「エレクトラ」について、うかがって参りました。こちらには今、「リナルド」を演じられたときのポートレートと、それからカナリヤの鳴き声が聞こえてまいります。 

 

 

***** 

 

EK 

This is home for you. This place near Warsaw, this is home. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

こちらが、エヴァさんのワルシャワのご自宅です。 

 

EP 

Yes, of course, this is my home. And I'm very happy to be here because already 35 years I'm traveling all of the world. So the best vacation for me is to spend time at my home. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

ええ、そうです。ここが私の自宅。もう35年間世界中を回っているから、自宅で過ごす時間が、私にとっては、最高の休暇の過ごし方です。 

 

EK 

You are from Warsaw, and I know you were educated, you were born ...  

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

お生まれはワルシャワで、音楽を学んだのは、生まれて… 

 

EP 

Yes, I was born in Warsaw.    

エヴァ・ポドレス 

ええ、ワルシャワの出身です。 

 

EK 

And you were educated in Warsaw as well.  

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

音楽学校もワルシャワに通われたんですか? 

 

EP 

Yes. Warsaw Academy of Music, now Frederick Chopin Academy.  

エヴァ・ポドレス 

そうです。ワルシャワ音楽アカデミー、今は国立のフレデリック・ショパン音楽大学といったわね。 

 

(music) 

(演奏) 

 

EK 

And as I heard your voice with Rossini, with Handel, with music like this, but this time you're doing Strauss.  

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

エヴァさんの歌声では、ロッシーニヘンデルの曲を聞かせていただいた事はあるのですが、今回はリヒャルト・シュトラウスということですが。 

 

EP 

Yes, it's natural way because when I was young and beautiful, 20 kilos younger, of course, I sang only Rossini, light repertoire because a little bit more heavy repertoire can destroy your voice, absolutely.  

エヴァ・ポドレシュ 

まあ、自然な流れでしょうね。というのも、まだ若い頃は …ちなみに超美人だったのよ(笑)まだお馬鹿さんで若かったわね、当然ながら。ロッシーニとか、軽めの曲しか歌いませんでした。これより少しでも重ための曲になると、声を完全に壊してしまいますからね。 

 

So it's very important to make choises when you are young, which kind of music, repertorie, you can choose or not.  

若い頃は曲選びがとても大切です。音楽の種類、レパートリー、どれを選んで、どれを選ばないかがね。 

 

I remember that 30 years ago, with people, managers, directors, music directors, they ask me to sing Verdi' s “Il Trovatore,” “Aida.”    

今でも憶えていますが、30年前、マネージャーさんや監督、音楽監督ですね、私にヴェルディの「イル・トロヴァトーレ」だの「アイーダ」だの歌ってくれと言ってくるわけですしょ。 

 

And I said, “Jesus! Maybe after 30 years I'll be able to sing this, but not now, with this light brilliant voice, almost like soprano voice!”   

私は「冗談じゃない!30年後には歌えるようになるだろうけど、今はだめよ。声質は軽いしキラキラだし、ほとんどソプラノだからね。」 

 

And it happened after 30 years. I'm not anymore “Rosina” in “Il Barbier de Seville,” of course. 

実際30年後に歌う機会がありましたよ。私も今では、「セビリアの理髪師」の「ロシーナ」役なんて、当然務まりません。 

 

In my age it's not ... it's stupid to take roles like this. But now I am ready to sing all those old witches, “Ulricca,” ( on Un ballo in mashera) “Azucena,” (on Il Trovatore) crazy, crazy ladies, you know!  

私の年齢では、今更そんな役なんか引き受けたら「バカじゃないの」。ただ、今では私も歌えるようになった役があって、「仮面舞踏会」に出てくる女占い師のウルリカとか、「イル・トロヴァトーレ」に出てくる老婆のアズチェーナとかね、お騒がせオバサン達よ! 

 

That's ... Everything is natural. It's just ... 30 years I couldn't sing this repertoire. Now I can. 

30年前は、そんなの歌えるはずもありませんでしたけれど、今は大丈夫です。 

 

EK 

Has your voice, because it's such a rare voice, has it ever been difficult for you? 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

なかなか聞かない、珍しいお声ですよね。大変じゃありませんでしたか? 

 

EP 

To do what? 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

何をするのが大変て? 

 

EK 

Well, perhaps there were things you couldn't do. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

ほら、ままならないこともあったんじゃないかと。 

 

EP 

Listen! I was born, I am not a singer. I was born with my voice. It was my only dream to sing. I had no choice.  

エヴァ・ポドレス 

何を仰る!私は生まれつき歌手の才能があったわけじゃないけれど、この声は持って生まれたものよ。将来の夢と言ったら、歌手になるしか無かったの。選択の余地なんてありませんでしたよ。 

 

And especially that my mother was a singer, fantastic singer, and my oldest sister, she was also a singer. So I had no choice.  

母が素晴らしい歌手で、一番上の姉も歌手でした。こうなったら、私も歌手になるしか無いでしょう。 

 

And I was born also with this flexibility, with coloratura. I didn't work specially. I mean, people have to work to sing fast, start slower, then faster and faster, step by step. They have to work. 

私の持って生まれた才能の1つが、柔軟性とコロラトゥーラ唱法です。このために特別練習をしたことはありません。普通の人は速いテンポで歌えるようになるには、ゆっくりから徐々にテンポを上げてゆきます。努力が必要なんです。 

 

I sang like this without any exercises, you know. I had it. I was born with this. And so, 30 years ago I didn't think even about different repertoire.   

何の練習もしないで、こんな風に歌えるようになりましたよ。持って生まれたものよ。それと、30年前は、当時自分が歌っていた曲とは、別のレパートリーを広げようなんて、考えもしませんでした。 

 

But my mother, she told me, “Ewa, if you will sing perfect, or you like, if you choose good repertoire, not too heavy, at the beginning of your career, you will save your voice for many many years, and you will be able to sing everything  what you want.” 

でも母がこう言ったんです「エヴァ、自分の歌を完璧にしたいなら、自分で良いレパートリーを作ってゆきたいなら、重すぎるのは駄目よ、駆け出しの頃はね。自分の声は長い年月節約して使わないとね。そうすれば、将来自分の好きな曲は何だって歌えるようになるわよ。」 

 

It's sure because, you know, it's very easy to destroy voice. For example, my sister, she had maybe the most beautiful alto voice, dark, beautiful. But she doesn't sing professionally because she finished our Warsaw Academy without voice! 

声を壊してしまうなんて、造作ないことです、これは間違いないわ。例えば私の姉妹は、本当にきれいなアルトの、渋い声だったけれど、プロとしては歌っていません。ワルシャワ音楽アカデミーを卒業するときに、学校に忘れてきちゃったのよ! 

 

So it's very easy to destroy something. So I always had to decide to accept, kind of, proposal, you know. They had a lot of, thousand of proposal that I had to, first of all, I had to see music if it's really for my voice or not.  

自分の持ち味持ち物を壊してしまうなんて、あっけないものです。ですから私は、常に曲自体を受け入れるか、ある意味、提案を受け入れるか、これについてはずっと考えさせられましした。何しろ、数え切れないほどの出演オファーが来るわけですから、自分の声に合うかどうか、見極めないといけませんわね。 

 

(music)             

(演奏) 

 

EK 

What was difficult for you to become an international singer at that time in Poland we were not so open to the world as we are? 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

当時ポーランドが、今のように国外へ気軽に出れなかった頃だと思うのですが、国際的な活動というのは大変じゃありませんでしたか? 

 

EP 

When I started to make my career, it wasn't so difficult. I went to all international competitions. I got many many prizes. It's still ... already do the countries started to open a little bit. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

デビュー当時は、それほどでもなかったですね。国際コンクールは全部出ましたし、賞も沢山頂きました。色んな国が、行き来が少しやりやすくなり始めていたかしらね。 

 

And in Poland we had always, kind of, freedom to compare with Germans, to compare with Russians. Poles, they had always ... It was easier for us to travel outside of Poland then for Czech, and into Russia. 

ポーランドは、ドイツやロシアの人達と比べたら、ある意味自由だったんじゃないの。ポーランドから出て、チェコ、そしてロシアと、他の国よりは楽に行き来できたかしら。 

 

EK 

I think it was a time actually when you were more famous outside Poland than in your own country. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

当時は国内よりも、まず国外で知名度が上がっていたかと思います。 

 

EP 

Ah! Yes. Later, of course, because, you know, for me, it was interesting to go to see to fight with others, with other singers to see how they work on stage. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

そうなのよねえ!国内は後だったわね。他の人達の競ったり、他の歌手たちが舞台でどんな風にやっているか、歌っているかを見るのは、スゴく興味深かったですよ。 

 

It is the best school of singing just to be on stage. You can't learn everything in studio. No! Just you have to stay in front of the audience and to find, to see the older  colleagues, how they work, how they sing, to take from them advice or, you know, things important. It was the best lesson for me. 

舞台は最高の音楽学校ですよ。レッスン室や録音室にいたんじゃ、全部を学べるわけじゃありませんから。無理よ。とにかく、お客さんの前に立たないとね。そうやって、自分より先輩の歌手達を見つけては見学して、助言をもらったり、そういうのが大切なんです。私にとってはそれが、最高のレッスンだったわよ。 

 

And now I am the oldest person on the stage! 

今じゃ私が、一番年上になっちゃったじゃないのよ! 

 

(music) 

(演奏) 

 

EK 

I think I remember one of your first recitals in Warsaw at The National Philharmonic. It was absolutely amazing for me. And this is something I think it always had special relationship with audience, Polish audiences or around the world.   

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

あなたがワルシャワのナショナル・フィルハーモニーで、初めてリサイタルをなさったときのことを、私憶えています。本当にすごかったです。お客さんとの絆が特別で、それはポーランドの観客だけじゃなくて、世界中でそうですよね。 

 

EP 

Because, for me, the message is the most important. I am not on stage to make vocalizes, to show only beauty of my voice? No! No! 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

それはね、メッセージこそが一番大切だからです。私は何も考えず、声だけ舞台で出してるわけじゃないの。キレイな声が出さえすればいい、そんなんじゃないんですよ! 

 

The most important is for me drama, text words to show to play with ... Not only with music but with words to act, to tell something important.  

私にとって一番大事なのは、音楽に込められた物語、歌詞や台本があるでしょ、それを演奏するわけですが、演技は音楽だけじゃなくて、セリフと一緒に、それで大事なことを伝えるわけですよ。 

 

And I'm sure the people are waiting for this, and the people love this. Even when I think sometimes something like “L'italiana in Algeri,” it is nothing tragic. 

お客さんもそれを待っている、それが好きでたまらない、これは間違いないわ。例えば、ロッシーニ作曲の「アルジェのイタリア女」、これって、悲劇でもなんでも無いわよね。 

 

But people cry, sometimes they come after performance with tears, and they cry. “Why are you crying?!” “Because you touched me so much.” 

でもこれを見たお客さんが涙を流すんですよ。本番が終わると涙を流すんです。「何で泣いているの?」「だってあなたの演奏が感動的なんですもの。」 

 

I know it's nothing cry, but I can't stop this. It's the best compliment for me because I'm for this to move, to touch people, too. 

このオペラは、見て涙を流すようなものじゃないのは、判ってはいますけど、別に「泣くな」なんて、言いやしませんよね。私にとっては最高の褒め言葉です。私はまさに、聴く人達を感動させようとしているわけでもあるのですから。 

 

EK 

Yes, to bring them a lot of energy, you have to touch many people. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

ですよね、お客さんにエネルギーを届けるためにも、感動させないといけませんよね。 

 

EP 

Yes. But for me, not for ... not only for me but I think the ... all artists, they have to touch them to move them because music without expression, without this special message, it's only noise for me. It's noise. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

そうです、でもこれは私に限ったことじゃない。音楽家は誰でもそうでしょう。お客さんを感動させないといけないのよ。だって伝える思いが表現されていない音楽なんて、特別なメッセージのない音楽なんて、私にはそんなの、ただの雑音だわよ。 

 

EK 

Is there any particular composer you like when you particularly enjoy singing? 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

特に好んで楽しんで歌う作曲家というのはありますか? 

 

EP 

I think I love what I'm singing right now, exactly. Even if from the very beginning, when you start to learn something. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

その時その瞬間に取り組んでいる曲が、一番好きだって、そう思っています。本当にね。人間誰でもそうでしょ、何か物事を学んで身につけるようになった、その一番最初からね。 

 

For example, “Elektra,” a few years ago, when I started to learn this music, I said, “Jesus! This is why I signed this contract? Why? It's so difficult! It's so stupid! It has so many notes, so it's difficult to compare with 'oompah oompah oompah,' Rossini, Handel!”  

例えば、リヒャルト・シュトラウスの「エレクトラ」、2,3年前でしたか、今回の「エレクトラ」の役が決まって、練習を始めたわけですけれど、その時は「まずいわよこれ!何でこんなの引き受けちゃったのかしら?!難しいわねぇ!バカだったわ、引き受けちゃって!こんなに音符が沢山並んでいて、ロッシーニとかヘンデルとかだったら「ブンチャ、ブンチャ」で済むのに、これは難しいわ!」 

 

You know, I read, I sing once, one phrase and already I remember this phrase.  

私の場合、今まででしたら、1回楽譜を読んで、1回でも、1節でも歌ったら、もうすぐに曲を憶えることが出来るんですよ。 

 

But Strauss, contemporary music and modern music, it's difficult, and I never sang this kind of music. So for me, it was challenge as “why, why, yeah, yeah!”  

でもこのリヒャルト・シュトラウスの曲は、近現代の音楽は難しいですよ。こんな感じの音楽を、歌ったことがないですからね。私にとっては、未知の世界に挑む、「えーい、もうやったれ!」て感じですよ。 

 

But now I just I fell in love. I, I ... it's so wonderful. Now I don't want to sing anymore, Rossini, Handel. No, I don't want because for me now it's this “Haka-kaka Haka-kaka!” It's so stupid, you know, to compare with such an incredible music like “Elektra.” 

でも今では、もうこの曲が大好きで、本当に素晴らしいですよね。こうなると、ロッシーニだのヘンデルだの、もういいや、歌いたくない!と。というのも、今までのは「タカタカ、タカタカ」(技巧ばかりを強調する楽曲)。こういうのは「エレクトラ」のように、音楽自体が極上の作品と比べると、軽薄に思えてしまいます。 

 

You can show something more not only technical, technical challenges. I mean, “Look at me how fast I can sing!” It's not a competition. When we are on stage, it's not a competition to show more and more. 

ともすると、技術的に難しそうなものばかりを披露するのかと思われがちですが、それ以上のものを、舞台からお客さんには伝えることだって出来るんです。つまりね「見て見て!私こんなに早口で、速いテンポで演奏できるのよ!」コンクールじゃないっつーの。舞台に立ったら、自分の小手先をこれでもかと沢山見せつける、コンクールじゃないって話よ。 

 

For me, something more important and not only flexibility, high notes and low notes. Of course, it should be because, you know, you can't sing anymore beautiful. 

私にとっては、柔軟性だけじゃなくて、やたら高い音が出せるだの、低い音が出せるだの、それだけが重要なものではありません。勿論、それはそれで、そうでないといけないのよ、でなきゃ綺麗に歌えっこないからね。 

 

It's not enough just to talk to people. You have to think. You have to think. 

人に話しかけるときに、言葉だけ投げかけたって駄目でしょ。頭で考えながらじゃないとだめ、それと同じよ。 

 

And I always ask my husband, “Please, you are the only person who can tell me frankly, 'Ewa, maybe it's ... You should finish. You should stop singing.'”   

夫にいつもお願いしていることがあります「お願いね、あんただけが『エヴァよ、もう潮時だな、引退しろや』と、包み隠さず言える立場なんだからね。」 

 

(music) 

(演奏) 

 

It's very different. It depends of .. sometimes the singer,  (Adam) Andrzejewski, he probably will sing with such a ... with the same young voice till now. But sometimes singers stop their career very early.  

人によって全然違いますよ、歌手によって違いますよ。例えば時には、アンジェイエフスキーなんかだと、若い頃のまんまの声でずっと歌うかも知れないけれど、歌手によっては人生早い段階で、歌をやめてしまう人もいるでしょう。 

 

Sometimes they are able to sing really good, still very good and very long. So I hope I will sing as long as it will be in good quality, you know, my singing will have good quality, acceptable for audience. 

ずっと上手なままで、スゴく長い間やれる人もいるでしょう。ですから私も、できるだけ長い間、上手にやっていたいの。歌唱力もずっと良い状態のままで、お客さんに何とか受け入れてもらえるくらいにね。 

 

EK 

Acceptable? I think that's not the enough word. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

何とか受け入れてもらえる?何か物足りないですね。 

 

EP 

“Acceptable” is not enough, you know, because sometimes I listen to the concerts of old singers, like, for example ... No, no names. But it's not good. They should not sing anymore.  

エヴァ・ポドレス 

「何とか」じゃあ物足りないわよね!何しろ年寄りのコンサートなんかに、時々聴きにいくと、例えば…名前は出さないようにしようっと。まあでも、良いことじゃない、もうこれ以上は歌うべきじゃない、ていう人もいるのよ。 

 

EK 

We've been talking about music, and you said that the music you like is the one you are doing right now. But what about the stages? Is there a particular stage you like to sing on? 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

ここまで演奏面の話をお聞かせいただいています。その時その場で取り組んでいる曲が、お好きなんだ、とのことです。では演奏会場はいかがですか?ここは歌うのに気に入っている、という舞台はおありですか? 

 

EP 

No, I think I feel onstage everywhere like fish in water. I'm very happy, you know, I started my stage career when I was three years old.  

エヴァ・ポドレシュ 

無いですね。私は舞台と名のつくところは、どこに立っても「水を得た魚のよう」に、イケますよ。心がウキウキします。私の初舞台は、3歳のときでした。 

 

I was Madame Butterfly's baby, Madame Butterfly's baby. So then I was “super” when I was teenager. And my mother sang in opera, she sang in choir. So I always went with her to do to the dressing room.  

その時の役は、「蝶々夫人」の娘役、小さな幼子の役ですよ。その後、10代の頃には、舞台が「チョー好き」になりましたね。母がオペラ、合唱の方で歌ってました。ですから私は彼女についていって、衣装やメイクをするわけですよ。 

 

It was the mystery place. I made, make up. I use her wigs, for example, and I really, I love the theater, this special atmosphere.  

10代の子にとっては、謎めいた場所ですよね。メイクをして、母のウィッグを借りて、例えばですね。本当に、劇場という、この特別な雰囲気が、もう大好きでした。 

 

So ... And always, it's not important if I sing in New York or in Nowy Targ in Poland. I try to do my best always. It depends on my actual possibility, I mean, conditions. Sometimes I don't feel very well. But I always sing. 

ですから、いつだって、ニューヨークだろうと、ポーランドの田舎のノヴィ・タルクだろうと、そんなのは重要ではありません。いつでもどこでも、最高の演技や演奏をする、それだけです。実際その場その時の、私の能力だの調子にもよりますけれどね。時には、今日は気分が良くないな、ていう日はあるでしょ。それでもずっと歌うのよ。 

 

Sometimes as usual for everybody, sometimes you have better performance, sometimes a little bit worse. But that's we are human beings. So it changes sometimes. 

誰に聴いてもらっても、いつも通りだな、ていう日もあれば、調子がいい日も悪い日もあるでしょ。でもそれが、人間というもの。調子なんて、変わることは時々はあるものよ。 

 

But I'm always ... I'm trying to do my best to sing as well as I can in this particular moment. 

でも私はいつだって…その場その場で、自分のベストを尽くせるよう、いつも心がけています。 

 

EK 

Well, you said you didn't have a favorite composer, but what about Chopin? And we're at a special moment Chopin. You will be doing Chopin's lieder, won't you?. 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

ずっとお気に入りの作曲家というものは、特に無いと仰っていましたが、ショパンはどうですか?ショパンは今、旬な話題ですよね、この後、ショパンの作品を採り上げるんでしたよね? 

 

EP 

Of course. Of course, yes. But I have my own choice in between all those Chopin songs with nineteen songs. I love five and six. 

エヴァ・ポドレス 

そりゃそうよ。でも同じショパンでも、私自身の好みがありますからね。19曲あるけど、私は5番目と6番目が大好きなの。 

 

And usually I sing them during my solo, piano recitals because the rest is not so interesting for me. And it's my music. Who has to sing Chopin in the world? Of course, Polish singers! So it's my duty. I have to do this.  

ピアノ奏者を連れてリサイタルをする時は、この2曲をいつも歌っています。だって残りの曲は、面白いと思えないんだもの。ショパンは私の持ちネタです。世界中でショパンは誰が歌うべきか、て言えば、ポーランド人歌手が歌わないでどうするの、て話です。これは私の責務です。歌わないわけには行かないのよ。 

 

EK 

(Karol) Szymanowski? 

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

カルロ・シマノフスキはどうですか? 

 

EP 

Oh, yes, of course, Szymanowski I sing. And (Witold) Lutoslawski. Now I sang here in December. I had recital, second recital in Wigmore Hall in London with Garrick Ohlsson.  

エヴァ・ポドレス 

勿論、カルロ・シマノフスキも歌いますよ。それとヴィトルト・ルトスワフスキもね。去年の12月にここで歌ったかしら。それと、ギャリック・オールソンにピアノを弾いてもらって、ロンドンのウィグモアホールで、2回目のリサイタルの時にも歌ったかな。 

 

And I sang (Mieczyslaw) Karlowicz's song, songs by Karlowicz. People don't know this music, so ... I love, I love absolutely. I prefer Karlowicz. For me the best, better than Chopin. 

それからミチェスワフ・カルウォーヴィッチの曲もね。まだ彼の作品は、知られていないから。私は大好きなのよ、本当に。ショパンなんかよりも、カルウォーヴィッチの曲のほうが、私は好きだな。 

 

******************* 

 

EえK 

From the archive of “Focus Magazine,” an interview with the great Ewa Podles, who died at the age of 71.  

エリザベータ・クライェフスカ 

「フォーカス・マガジン」で過去に放送いたしましたインタビューの中から、この度71歳で亡くなられましたエヴァ・ポドレスさんの分をお送りいたしました。大変偉大な歌手でした。 

 

And this is Elzbieta Krajewska. Thanks for listening, and good bye.  

ご案内はエリザベータ・クライェフスカでした、お聞きいただいましてありがとうございました。失礼いたします。 

 

  

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAVbxob8rN8 

 

歌劇「エレクトラ」(2011年) 

主人公の母親「クリテムネストラ」を熱演します。 

 

 

英日対訳:サラ・サワー(加・Drum)2018"Drumeo":インド音楽のリズムをドラムに/周辺知識の大切さ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KKZ-SaVZhA 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

2018/06/28  #drumeo #drumlessons #2b 

 

0:01 

[Music]  

Sarah Thawer 

Like I mentioned earlier that since these grooves originate on percussion, this is just my take on the drums. 

サラ・サワー 

さっき言った通り、このリズムの組み合わせ方は、打楽器演奏が大本なので、ドラム奏者の私には、まさに自分のやるべきこと、て感じです。 

 

Try and hear it in a musical setting, and then knowing when and where and how and why to add it. 

実際に演奏の場面でやってみて、聞いてみてください。そうやって、いつどこで、どんな風に、どういった根拠で取り入れていくか、身につけてみてください。 

 

 

Introduction 

はじめに 

 

 

3:16 

Reuben Spiker 

That was awesome, man!  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

すごい! 

 

ST 

Thank you.  

サラ・サワー 

どうも。 

 

RS 

Thank you. That was super cool, and welcome to “Drumeo,” everyone. My name is Reuben Spiker. This is Sarah Thawer. We are super stoked to have you out.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

ありがとう、超カッコ良かった。皆さん、「Drumeo」をご覧いただき、有難うございます。僕はルーベン・スパイカーといいます。こちらは、サラ・サワーさん。お越しいただいて、メッチャ嬉しいです。 

 

3:27 

ST 

Thank you so much for having me.  

サラ・サワー 

呼んでいただいて、嬉しいです。 

 

RS 

Super stoked. So we have an amazing lesson planned for you guys. Let's get into it. We're going to be breaking down some awesome Indian grooves that you've taken from some percussion stuff, and you're going to be showing us how you apply to the kits  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

こちらこそ。さあ、今日は皆さんに、すごいレッスンを用意しました。早速見てゆきましょう。今日はインド音楽のリズムの組み合わせを見てゆきましょう。これはサラさんが、ある打楽器の演奏から取り入れて、ドラムで演奏するやり方を、教えてくれる、というものです。 

 

3:44 

ST 

First off, I want to say thank you so much for “Drumeo” for having me.  

サラ・サワー 

まずは、今日は「Drumeo」に呼んでいただいて、有難うございます。 

 

3:45 

Indian grooves are really special to me. They ... these are the first grooves that actually started playing as a child growing up.  

インド音楽のリズムの組み合わせは、私にとっては本当に特別なものです。小さい頃に本格的に音楽をやり始めた頃に、最初に出会ったリズムの組み合わせなんです。 

 

3:50 

So Indian rhythms are expressed in many ways. One of the many ways Indian grooves are expressed are in the north Indian tradition style called “Bols.” “Tabla Bols.” Like [singing as example] 

インド音楽のリズムは、表現の仕方が沢山あります。その内の1つが、インド北部の伝統的なスタイルで、「ボル」といいます。「タブラ・ボル」といって、こんな感じです(歌ってみせる)。 

 

4:04 

Then there's the south Indian syllables known as “Solkattu.”  

それと、インド南部のやり方が「ソルカットゥ」といいます。 

 

4:10 

One thing that I want to point out that ... that language is incredible and that's the language that I grew up learning. I grew up studying Tabla and Indian percussion. 

ここで言っておきたいことがあって、この演奏方法は、スゴイです。私は小さい頃から、これをずっと大人になるまで学んできましたし、タブラという伝統的な太鼓や、インドの打楽器のことも勉強してきました。 

 

4:17 

But today what ... my approach is going to be more of a pattern oriented, groove-oriented, feel-oriented style of Indian drumming, like how we have, you know, James Brown, funk, uh, playing mambo in the Cuban setting. So that's the kind of stylistic approach that we're going to be taking.  

でも今日は…今日やるのは、どっちかと言うと、インドの打楽器演奏のやり方を、パターン化したものとか、組み合わせ方そのものだとか、感覚的なものとか、そんな風に見てゆきましょう。例えばですね、ジェームス・ブラウンとか、ファンクミュージックとか、キューバ音楽のマンボとかですね。こう言った種類のやり方も、今日は見てゆきましょう。 

 

4:35 

So the first groove that we're going to be talking about is called “Kerala.” Man, this groove is actually really special to me. It's a groove in 4/4. It can be in 2/4 as well. But for this exercise, it's gonna be in 4/4.  

最初は「ケララ」という組み合わせ方です。まあ、これは本当に私には特別なものです。四拍子、二拍子でも大丈夫。今日のレッスンは四拍子でやってみます。 

 

4:50 

So, you know, we got the back beat in funk and R&B and rock. [singing as example] I was on 2 and 4. So, for the “Kerala,” the cool thing about it is that our back beats are on the “Uh.” So [singing as example] 

ファンクミュージックやR&B、ロックも、バックビートですよね(歌ってみせる)。今、2拍目と4拍目を強調しました。「ケララ」の注目点は、バックビートが「ウッ」、つまり1拍目と3拍目に来るんです(歌ってみせる)。 

 

5:11 

And there's a cool thing where I see rants on Facebook where people are like, “Hey, if you clap on the one and three, that's not real music!” Or, you know, “You'd better be clapping on the four because that's where the beat is at.” 

ちょっと聞いてほしいのは、フェイスブックで叩かれるんですよ、こんな風に「おいおい、1拍目と3拍目で手拍子すんなよ、それでもプロの音楽かよ!」てね。とか「4拍目にビートがあるんですから、そこで手拍子したほうが良いですよぉ」なんてね。 

 

And I'm like, “Hey, guys,” like, “I cringe every time I hear that!”  

そしたらこうリプしたくなっちゃいますよ「あのさ、毎回毎回ウンザリなんだよね!」 

 

5:25 

Because our rhythms are always on the upbeats on the “Uhs”. If I'm clapping on the two and four and everything's on the upbeat, we're not gonna feel the pulse.  

だって、いっつもアップビートは「ウッ」、つまり1拍目と3拍目じゃないですか。2拍目と4拍目で手拍子をして、全部アップビートで、そうすると拍感が感じられないんですよ。 

 

5:32 

So I apologize, I love to clap on the downbeats! So this is what this groove is really about. なので、ごめんなさい、私はダウンビートで手拍子したいんです!そしてこのことが、このリズムの本質なんですよ。 

 

5:37 

Let's just get right into it. “Example Number 1.” We got some eighth notes happening on the hi-hat. We're going to be accenting all the down beats with the edge of the stick, and then all the “Ens” with the tip.  

そしたら譜例1(#1a)から早速行きましょう。8分音符をハイハットで叩きます。ダウンビートのアクセントは、スティックの真ん中あたりを使ってスネアドラムの縁を叩きます。そして「ウッ」は全部、スティックの先端を使います。 

 

5:48 

And we're going to be playing all the odds with the snare just like a back-beat. And the kick is going to be on the one and three. I'm going to play it at three different tempos. [Music] 

裏拍のその裏は、スネアドラムを叩きます。これはバックビートのやり方ですね。それから、足、バスドラムは1拍目と3拍目です。色々なテンポでやってみますね。 

(演奏) 

 

6:39 

RS 

So that's usually performed at the last tempo generally?  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これは、最後のテンポが、普通使われるよね。 

 

6:42 

ST bpm = beat per minute 

I would say it really varies on the style. It can be performed really slow like even at 60 bpm, or it can be like up to like 200, 300 bpm, and just burning fast. 

サラ・サワー 

ていうか、曲の形式で変わってくる、て感じかな。テンポ60とか結構遅いのとか、逆に200とか300とかメッチャ速いのとか。 

 

6:53 

RS 

Wow! Yeah, that's crazy, man!  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そうか、それはイッちゃってるね。 

 

ST 

Yeah. 

サラ・サワー 

だね。 

 

RS 

What percussion instrument is that one taken from? 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これは大本の打楽器は何なの? 

 

6:56 

ST 

We have the Tabla, North Indian instrument. We have the Dholak. We have the Khol. I would say like this is the most popular Indian groove.  

サラ・サワー 

インド北部の楽器で、タブラっていうの。ドーラク(両面に皮を貼ったもの)とか、コールとか。インド音楽のリズムの組み合わせを演奏する、一番良く使われるもの、て感じかな。 

 

7:04 

RS 

OK.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

なるほど。 

 

ST 

Yeah.  

サラ・サワー 

そうなの。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。 

 

7:08 

ST 

So I think ...  

サラ・サワー 

だから… 

 

RS 

It's like “the one to learn.”  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

「オススメ」て感じかな。 

 

ST 

If you want to impress some people from the Indian culture, just pop up and play this beat. So I'll give you some incentive to learn these grooves. 

サラ・サワー 

インドの伝統文化を印象づたいなら、このビートをチャチャッとやってみたら良いですよ。そしたら、このリズムの組み合わせをモノにする方法を、お見せしましょう。 

 

RS 

Cool! Cool!   

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね、いいね! 

 

7:16 

ST 

Yeah! So the second groove that we're going to go to, um ... it's going to be the same groove, but we're going to add some ghost notes to it. We're going to add a ghost note on the “Eh.” So, you know, let's check out some James Brown, or, let's refer to some James Brown grooves.  

サラ・サワー 

でしょ?じゃあ、次行こうか…次は、同じリズムの組み合わせですが、音をほとんど鳴らさない部分を入れます。拍の頭の、そのまた裏に、これを入れます。これはジェームス・ブラウンの演奏をチェックするか、あるいは、ジェームス・ブラウンの音楽のリズムの組み合わせを見てみると、良いと思います。 

 

7:30 

That style is made up of so many ghost notes. Even if you hear a lot of other genre, ghost notes really make up the feel. And I would say it's a very similar situation to this as well. You need to involve some of that feeling into it with the ghost notes.  

この演奏方法は、音をほとんど鳴らさない部分が沢山使われています。他のジャンルの音楽をたくさん聞いてみるとわかりますが、音をほとんど鳴らさない部分というのが、曲の雰囲気を創っているんです。このレッスンであつかうのも、すごくよく似ていて、その感じを、音を鳴らさない部分を使って出していきます。 

 

7:43 

When you take J Dilla swing ... you have cuban swing, you have New Orleans, you have jazz, you have a bunch of these styles. And all of these styles have a distinct swing to them. And I would say the same thing to this. 

ヒップホップのJ.ディラのノリとか…キューバ音楽とか、ニューオーリンズの音楽とか、ジャズとか、この演奏方法は沢山あります。これ全部に、ハッキリとしたノリがあります。今日のレッスンのリズムにも、全く同じことが言える、と思います。 

 

7:56 

There, we have it really straight. We got it, kind of, in the middle, and then we got it heavily swung. I personally like to play it in between, the two. Maybe I can demonstrate a little bit of the feel with this “Excercise B” and add some ghost notes to demonstrate.  

今から、あまり抑揚をつけないやり方と、中間くらいと、ウンと極端にと、やってみます。私は個人的には中間くらい、つまり2つ目が良いかな。#1bに、音をほとんど鳴らさない部分を入れて、やってみます。 

 

8:09 

RS 

Sounds good. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。 

 

8:11 

ST 

And I'll play it at three tempos.  

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

それとテンポは3つのパターンでやってみます。 

(演奏) 

 

8:54 

RS 

Are the different levels of swing ... is it wrong to learn one level? Or are they all used?  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

色々なノリのレベルがあるけど、どれか1つだけ身につける、じゃ駄目なの?全部やっておいたほうが良いのかな? 

 

9:00 

ST 

So I would maybe relate that to hip-hop, you know, when you have like “Boom Bap,” “Trap”, or J Dilla, like the J Dilla swing. It's like, if you listen to the music, you should know how to apply what and when.  

サラ・サワー 

ヒップホップで例えたら、「Boom Bap」とか「Trap」とか、あとJ.ディラのノリとか、つまり、音楽を聞いて、時と場合で使い分けるべきじゃないかしらね。 

 

9:13 

RS 

I got you. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

なるほど。そうだね。 

 

ST 

And some ... like, when I play with some musicians they swing like crazy, and I'm like “Holy Smokes! I'm not used to that!” Or some musicians, they just play it like right down the middle.  

サラ・サワー 

それと、何ていうか、あるミュージシャンの方と演奏させていただいた時は、スウィングの仕方が極端で「ヤバい、これあんましやったこと無いわ~。」みたいな。別の方だと、丁度良い感じに中間をとってくれたり、みたいな。 

 

9:21 

So I guess it's just really being able to hear it and knowing when to apply it.  

だから、その場その場で聞けるようになって、当てはめるタイミングを身に着けたほうが、良いんじゃないかと思う。 

 

9:25 

RS 

I got you.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そうだね。 

 

ST 

Yeah.  

サラ・サワー 

そうなのよ。 

 

9:28 

RS 

Cool. Maybe let's hear that one more time a little bit slower. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。そしたら、もう1回、ちょっとゆっくり目でいいかな。 

 

ST 

Sure.  

サラ・サワー 

わかった。 

 

9:30 

RS 

And then just try out super straight again, and then maybe if you want to try out the swing again, but this is a super cool rhythm.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そしたら、超ふつうに、もう一度やってみて。皆さんもし良かったら、あとでもう一度演ってみてください。これは超かっこいいリズムですから。 

 

9:37 

ST 

Thanks. Super slow  

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

ありがと。超ゆっくりやるわね。 

(演奏) 

 

10:15 

RS 

I really like the swing feel on that, one that feels really nice.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

ノリの感じが凄くしっかり出ていて、良かった。本当にイイ感じ。 

 

ST 

It feels nice.  

サラ・サワー 

イイ感じよね。 

 

10:20 

RS 

Cool! All right. So, let's move on to the next one. You have here which was Variation Number 1, using the bell. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

よし、さてそれじゃあ、次に行きます。次は「Variation 1」(#2a)です。ここではシンバルの真ん中の膨らみ「ベル」を使います。 

 

10:26 

ST 

Yes! Yeah! So, for this next one, we're going to be using the bell of the hi-hat. I love to get super creative with this because, you know what? There are no rules of these grooves. It's your interpretation.  

サラ・サワー 

そうです!そしたら、次はですね、ハイハットのベルの部分を使います。これは私大好きで、自分の考えでどんどん創っていくんです。というのはですね、このリズムの組み合わせは、決まり事なんて無いんです。自分の解釈でいいんですよ。 

 

10:36 

So let's check out using this bell and we're going to use this bell on basically every down beat, and it's going to follow by two 16 notes on the hi-hat. And we're going to play some ghost notes and move some of the kicks around. So check it out.  

そしたら、ベルを使いますので聞いていてください。基本ダウンビートに、その後に16分音符をハイハットで鳴らします。それから、音をほとんど鳴らさない部分だとか、あとは足踏みのバスドラムも入れます。聞いていてください。 

 

10:50 

RS 

Cool 

[Music] 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。 

(演奏) 

 

11:17 

RS 

Is there a certain setting where you would use the bell more? Or just like to cut through a little more? Or is it just you're feeling that out if it's like a little bit quieter you won't use the bell and then?  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これってベルの部分を、使わなきゃいけない場面、ていうのがあるのかな?それともチャチャッと済ませちゃうとか?あるいは、音楽自体が静か目のだったら、ベルは使わないようにしようとか言って、とにかく自分で見極めるとか? 

 

11:25 

ST 

So I would say depending on the song, depending on the part like maybe at a (AABA form's) “B” section, or like an “A1” or “A2” section.  

サラ・サワー 

曲によるかな、みたいな。曲の、例えばAABA形式の「B」とか、1回目のAだったり2回目のAだったりとかで、決めるとか。 

 

11:32 

I guess it's just trying to figure out where in the song that fits, or listening to the other percussionists, some of them pop up some conduries, some bells, where they're accenting all the down beats, so why not follow them? And, you know, try it out, yeah.  

多分だけど、とにかく曲の中でどこでやったら良いかを見極める、それだけじゃないかな。あるいは他の打楽器の人達をよく聴いて、金物だったり、ベルだったりが急に音量が飛び出して、その人達がダウンビートで全部アクセントを付けてきたら、一緒にやってみたら良いんじゃないかな。そして、とにかくやってみる、みたいなね。 

 

11:46 

RS 

So it's again kind of trying to mimic someone playing bells in the background, kind of, add in some more textures. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

同じこと言うけど、支えのベルの音をやっている人の真似をしてみて、全体の中に組み込んでいく、みたいな感じだね。 

 

11:50 

ST 

Definitely.  

サラ・サワー 

そう、そのとおりよ。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。 

 

11:52 

ST 

Yeah. I, kind of, imagine this as the bells. I imagine these two, kind of, as the percussion instruments.  

サラ・サワー 

そう。私は、何ていうか、ライドシンバルはベルみたいかな、スネアドラムとトムは、何ていうか、他の打楽器、て感じだと思ったの。 

 

RS 

OK.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

わかった。 

 

11:59 

ST 

So move on to the second one, the “B.” Actually, we'll be using the bell again, but we're gonna be putting the bell on the “Ens”.  

サラ・サワー 

そしたら、次、#2bに行きましょう。実はここでもまた、ベルを使いますけど、今度は「ウッ」てところでベルを使います。 

 

RS 

OK. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

なるほど。 

 

ST 

All right. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

じゃあ、いくわよ。 

(演奏) 

 

12:30 

ST 

Now I'm going to switch in between the two and maybe we can hear more of a difference.  

サラ・サワー 

そしたら、この2つを入れ替えて、違いがよく分かるように、やってみるわね。 

 

RS 

Sure, between .... 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

2つというと… 

 

ST 

Between the two “A” and two “B.”  

サラ・サワー 

#2aと#2bよ。 

 

RS 

I got you.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

ああ、そうか。 

 

ST 

OK, all right. And you can maybe hear the difference in the feeling as well. 

サラ・サワー 

はい、そしたら、リズムの形だけじゃなくて、雰囲気の違いも、多分伝わると思うの。 

 

12:42 

RS 

So putting the accent on the one and then switching to the “Ens.”  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そしたら、アクセントを、片一方は付けて、入れ替えてやるときは、「ウッ」につける、てこと? 

 

ST 

Exactly.  

サラ・サワー 

そう、そのとおりよ。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

わかった。 

 

ST 

All right. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

よろしい。 

(演奏) 

 

13:09 

ST 

So, Number three, we're going to actually involve some cross-stick to it.  

サラ・サワー 

そしたら次は、#3aに行きましょう。ここではクロス・スティック奏法を使います。 

 

13:14 

So the cool thing about this groove is ... There's different dynamics on the Tabla. So the crossing is emulating a sound that's maybe more of a “mp” (mezzo piano).  

このリズムの組み合わせのカッコいいところは…タブラっていう太鼓は音量差の違う2つの太鼓の組み合わせなんですよ。なので、このクロス・スティック奏法、ていうのは、音量的にはメゾピアノの方を、真似したものですね。 

 

13:26 

And then when we go to the snare, it's like a “f”(forte). So let's give it a go. Let's give it a go. 

[Music] 

これに対して、スネアドラムのヘッドを叩く方は、フォルテみたいな。まあ、やってみようね。とにかく。 

(演奏) 

 

14:05 

RS 

That's probably one I think I like the textural change between the cross- stick and snare on that one. I think that's my favorite one so far.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これって多分、リズムの構造が変わるよね、クロス・スティック奏法のと、スネアドラムのヘッドを叩くのとでね。これ今までで一番好きかも。 

 

ST 

Yway! Yeah. it feels really great.  

サラ・サワー 

でしょ?スゴく良い感じよね。 

 

RS 

Next up we had experimenting with sound sources.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

次は、色々な大本の楽器のサウンドを、ドラムで試してみます。 

 

ST 

Yes. So going back again to how we're imitating percussion instruments. So there's this cool barrel shaped drum called the Dholak, bass side and the high side.  

サラ・サワー 

はい。そうしたらインドの打楽器を色々真似してきましたけど、それを思い出してもらってください。樽の形をしたこのカッコいい太鼓、ドーラク、ていうんですけど、両側に皮が貼ってあって、片方は低音、片方は高音です。 

 

14:27 

And I would say it has very similar technique to the Tabla as well. So if you can play Tabla, in my opinion, you can play Dholak as well. And you can kind of switch in between the two.  

ドーラクとタブラは、スゴくよく似た演奏の仕方をする、と言っていいかも、です。なので、タブラが叩ければ、これは個人的な意見ですけど、ドーラクもイケるかも。そうすると、ある意味、取り替えてやれたりもします。 

 

14:37 

So what the cool thing is about this groove is that a lot of Dholak players wear a pinky ring and what they do is they hit the wood of the barrel with the pinky ring. And they usually do that on the downbeats and how we keep talking about the “Uh”s, or I keep talking about the “Uh”s.  

このリズムの組み合わせのカッコいいところは、ドーラクの奏者が沢山いて、皆がピンキーリングという指環をしているんですね。それで、皆してですね、その樽みたいな形の太鼓の、木の部分をピンキーリングで叩くんです。大抵はダウンビートでそれをやって、1拍目と3拍目を聞かせ続ける、ていうか、私が今ここでやって見せるとおりですけど。 

 

14:53 

It's that they're hitting on the downbeat on the wood and then they're hitting the upbeats with their index finger on the drum. So what I like to do when I'm playing in a gig or something like that, and I have to emulate that sound.  

ドーラクの奏者達が、ダウンビートを指環で木の部分を叩いて、アップビートは、人差し指で皮を叩くんです。なので、本番でこれをやるときは、このサウンドを真似するようにしています。私の好みでね。 

 

15:04 

I'm like, “All right, we got the rims of the toms and that can emulate the ring on the pinky hitting the wood.” And then the height can be on the “En”s, and we got the “Uh”s happening on the snare with various kick patterns. 

[Music] 

「よっしゃ、(ドラムセットの)トムのリム(縁)があるから、ピンキーリングがドーラクの木を叩くようなのを、真似してやってみよう」みたいな。ここでは「ウッ」が強調されて、1拍目と3拍目はスネアドラムを、色々なスティックを使うパターンで叩いていきます。これに足の方、つまりハイハットの合わせ奏法とバスドラムの奏法も、色々変えていきます。 

(演奏) 

 

15:51 

ST 

So it's just experimenting with the sound sources and adapting the grooves that we played.  

サラ・サワー 

大本の楽器の音を真似してみて、これを今までやってきたリズムの組み合わせに当てはめる、それだけです。 

 

RS 

So you can kind of take all those other things mix them up and make your own ideas out of them with that.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

こういうのを、何でも使って混ぜ合わせてみて、自分だけのアイデアを創っていく、これを出来るようになる、てことだね。 

 

ST 

Exactly.  

サラ・サワー 

そのとおりよ。 

 

16:00 

RS 

Cool! Just by switching the sound source. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

すごいね、色々入れ替えるだけでいいんだもんね。 

 

16:03 

ST 

Yeah! It makes the world of a difference.  

サラ・サワー 

そうよ、これで音の世界観がかわるからね。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

すごいね。 

 

16:05 

ST 

So we've been on the hi-hat for a bit too long. Let's move on to the ride synbal. So what I like to do when we move to the ride cymbal, the high-hats are not doing anything.  

サラ・サワー 

そしたら、ハイハットばっかりだったので、今度はライドシンバルの方を見てゆきましょう。今やってみたいのは、ライドシンバルを使う時は、ハイハットをスティックで叩かないやり方です。 

 

16:13 

So I'm just like, “Let's incorporate some feet.” There are a lot of options on quarters on eighths (♪) on the “En”s on two and four on the ones and the threes.  

「両足使ってみようかな」みたいな感じですね。「ウッ」が1拍目と3拍目の2つ目や4つ目の8分音符にやれることが、沢山あります。 

 

16:23 

Feel free to try them out. Feel free to see what works for you. 

[Music] 

色々自由に試してみて、出てきた音を自分で確かめて見てください。 

(演奏) 

 

17:17 

RS 

Cool. So for something like that when you're incorporating your foot, would you recommend just taking out half of your rims at first to try, you know, get your foot comfortable with that?  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。ということは、例えば足を使ったものを入れたいな、と思ったら、まずリムを使うのを半分に減らして、その、イケる範囲で足の方を加えてみるとか、そういうのがオススメ、て感じ? 

 

17:26 

ST 

Yeah. Or what I recommend is that sometimes I personally have a tendency when learning new things is thinking about the technical aspect of it too much. 

サラ・サワー 

そうね。オススメ、ていうか、私個人的には、新しいことを身に着けようとする時に、小手先のことばっかり考えちゃうことが、結構あるのよね。 

 

17:35 

But each rim has a voice. Each rim has a melody. So I would say for this exercise, the hi-hat, the kick, the snare, and the ride (cymbal), all have a melody. So I personally believe that if you sing it, you'll be able to play it.  

でも、どの太鼓のリムにも、独自の「声」みたいなのがあって、それぞれがメロディになったりするから、今回のレッスンではハイハットバスドラム、スネアドラム、それからライドシンバルも、全部メロディがある、だから個人的には、歌ってみて、歌えればドラムでもやれる、てことかな。 

 

17:50 

RS 

So next up you had a variation on that.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

さっき次にやる変化形をやってたよね。 

 

ST 

Um, I did. So this cool exercise is a variation, a “Kherwa” variation in two and four ... Sorry, and “2/4,” times signature “2/4.” What I chose for this variation is to play the ends on the bell of the ride (cymbal), and the down beats on the ride cymbal. So let's just give it a listen. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

やってた。それでは次は、「ケーワ」という#6のバリエーションで、2拍目と4拍目…あ、ごめんなさい、2拍子ね、拍子記号だった。このバリエーションをやるのは、ライドシンバルのベルの、山の麓の部分を叩くことです。それで、ダウンビートをライドシンバルでやります。まあ、聴いてみてください。 

(演奏) 

 

18:58 

RS 

And here's some like really cool, you know, ideas for playing some fusion music or some gospel stuff even with that one. That's really cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これ1つ入っただけで、なんか、フュージョン音楽とか、ゴスペルっぽいというか、そういうのを演奏するのに、めちゃめちゃカッコいいみたいな感じだね。 

 

ST 

Totally, you totally can.  

サラ・サワー 

本当にそうよね。 

 

RS 

That's awesome. That's like a very versatile one to use.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

すごいよ。これって色々使いみちが沢山ある、みたいな。 

 

19:11 

ST 

Yeah. I definitely try to apply these grooves in my everyday playing in whatever I play.  

サラ・サワー 

本当にそうよ。これは何を演奏するときにでも、毎日必ず、このリズムの組み合わせを使うようにしてるけど。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そうなんだ。 

 

19:16 

ST 

Because they're really, they have a really melodic flavor to it.  

サラ・サワー 

というのも、メロディっぽい感じが、本当にするからね。 

 

RS 

Cool! And we'll talk about how at the end you can apply these to something else but ... 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。それとこのあと、これの終りのところで、他のものを付け加えてもいいし、でも… 

 

ST 

Yeah!  

サラ・サワー 

そうよ。 

 

RS 

... keep moving along and then we'll get to that at the very end. So Number 7 was adding stack to the “Kherwa” and I like how you told me about that earlier ...  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

…ずっと叩き続けて、それで曲の一番最後までたどり着けるよね。そしたら次は#7だね。「ケーワ」に積み重ねるような形で、さっき僕に言ってくれたのは… 

 

ST 

Yes!  

サラ・サワー 

はいはい! 

 

RS 

... basically this was like your idea to copy the hand clapping.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

…基本になるのが、手拍子を真似るという、君のアイデア、みたいな感じだね。 

 

19:36 

ST 

Yeah! So a lot of these beautiful Indian grooves, the culture involves people dancing community. So when we play these grooves in public, everyone's kind of clapping. And when I mentioned to you earlier sometimes I have to do this (at) gigs where there's no other percussionist.  

サラ・サワー 

そうなの!今まで見てきたインド音楽の、スゴく良い感じのリズムの組み合わせが沢山あって、インドの文化の中には、集団で踊る、ていうのがあるよね。皆で集まってこのリズムの組み合わせを楽しむ時は、皆で手拍子みたいのをするじゃない。私がさっき言ったのは、本番で他に打楽器を演る人が居ない場合は、これを1人でやらないといけないのよ。 

 

19:55 

So I have to cover all these parts. There's someone playing  some conjuring and highlighting the claps of the people  

これを全部網羅しないといけないから、そうすることで、大勢の人たちが手拍子をしているみたいな感じを作って、それを際立たせる、てこと。 

 

19:59 

So I made this kind of thing up. I'm just like “OK, let's bring a stack to these gigs.” And let me see if I imitate the people clapping or experiment thinking of it as a clap on different accents, like on the one and the three on all the quarters on the two and four. Let me see if it makes a difference and maybe the audience's reaction is going to change. And it really did, as soon as I started kind of hitting the corners, everyone's like “Whoa!” and they followed along. So it really makes a difference.  

だからこんな感じのを作って「よっしゃ、本番でこれをやってみようかな」みたいなね。そしたら、色々アクセントを変えて、人が集団で手拍子を打っているみたいなのを、真似したものをやってみましょう。2拍目と4拍目にある8分音符の1個目と3個目、みたいな感じかな。変化が出るか、聞く人たちのリアクションが変わるかどうか、やってみましょう。実際にやってみて、ある意味うまくやれだしたな、てところで、皆が「おお、スゴイ」ってなって、ついてきてくれる要因になって、本当に違いがハッキリ見えてきます。 

 

20:23 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイじゃない。 

 

ST 

Yeah.  

サラ・サワー 

でしょ。 

 

20:23 

RS 

All right let's check out how that sounds, yet some like, or just checking that into a beat.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

それじゃあ、そのサウンドが、ていうか、それっぽいのが、同ビートにハマるか、見てみよう。 

 

ST 

Yeah. I'm just gonna put it in a “Kherwa” 

サラ・サワー 

いいわよ。「ケーワ」でやってみようか。 

 

20:31 

RS 

Sounds good. So pick one of the ones we've gone over and try applying that yourself.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。そしたら皆さんも、これからやってみるのを、自分でもやってみてください。 

 

20:35 

ST 

Definitely. And just imagine people dancing and clapping, or what I like to do is when learning a new genre I watch dancers. I watch how people bob their head, move their body, and then you, kind of ... that's an indication of kind of what to place where and when. So let's just get into it.  

サラ・サワー 

是非やってみてください。その時イメージしてほしいのが、大勢の人達が踊って手拍子を打って、ていうか、新しいことを私が身に着けようとする時、その音楽に合わせて踊る人達を観察するようにしています。首を上下に振ったり、体を揺すったり、これって、リズムの「どこで、いつ」みたいなのを教えてくれるんです。それじゃ、やってみましょうか。 

 

RS 

Sounds good.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

ぜひとも。 

 

20:53 

ST 

All right. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

それじゃ。 

(演奏) 

 

21:31 

RS 

Awesome! That's really cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイ、まじイケてる! 

 

ST 

Yeah. It's fun.  

サラ・サワー 

でしょ、楽しいわよね。 

 

RS 

Sweet! So next up we had a fill ... 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

だよね。さあ、次はフィルを… 

 

ST 

Yes! 

サラ・サワー 

そうです! 

 

21:36 

RS 

So you can after you've learned all these awesome grooves now you'll have something you can transition into different ideas with.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

そしたら、今までのカッコいいリズムの組み合わせを見てきたところで、これを色々な場面ややり方に当てはめていこう。 

 

21:42 

ST 

Definitely. So this groove, sorry, this still is a very simple fill. I'm just going to give the hand gestures. First, it's right, left, left, right, left, left, right.  

サラ・サワー 

勿論。そしたら、このリズムの組み合わせを…ごめん、ここまでは、まだ単純な「フィル」だから。ちょっと手でやってみましょう。まず、右、左、左、右、左、左、右。 

 

And all the rides (cymbals) are going to be accented. And it's going to start on beat three. So one, two, pa-toto-pa-toto-pa! Let's give it a listen  

そしたら、ライドシンバルが全部アクセントを付けます。これは3拍目から始まります。なので1、2、パトゥトゥパトゥトゥパ!。とりあえず聴いてください。 

 

RS 

Sounds good. 

[Music] 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

良い感じじゃない。 

(演奏) 

 

22:15 

ST 

What I also recommend is try voicing it on the kit putting, maybe their rights (=right hands) on the toms or even maybe putting your left hand. So let's just try little voicing.   

サラ・サワー 

あとお勧めしたいのが、これをドラムセットで音程差のあるトム、右手で、場合によっては左手も使って、音を色々と並べてる、ちょっとやってみますね。 

 

RS 

Sounds good. 

[Music] 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいね。 

(演奏) 

 

22:50 

ST 

Now I'm going to put it in a groove setting, playing a “Kherwa” groove, and playing this fill, I'm going to play it at a relatively medium tempo and then maybe bring it up.  

サラ・サワー 

これをリズムの組み合わせの中でやってみますね。「ケーワ」の組み合わせでやってみます。そのときに、このフィルを使います。テンポは中位で、そうすれば際立ってわかりやすいと思うので。 

 

RS 

Sounds good.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

お願いします。 

 

ST 

Cool.  

サラ・サワー 

はいはい。 

 

RS 

Sounds good  

[Music] 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

よろしく。 

(演奏) 

 

23:37 

RS 

Cool! That's like a really effective pattern. So definitely take that, apply it to, like, every part of your kit you can think of. And get creative with it  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイ!これは本当に、効果のあるパターンだね。是非皆さんのドラムセットでもやってみてください。それも、思いつくもの全部の部分を使って、そうやって独自のものを音にしてください。 

 

ST 

Especially because this music really stems from dancing and community. You don't want to throw somebody off with some crazy fill. I feel like this fill comes from the percussion instruments, obvi(ously), of course as mentioned. But there's a flow to it as well.  

サラ・サワー 

特にこの音楽は、踊りとか、人々が集団でひしめいている、そんな状況から出てきた音楽ですから、あまり変なフィルを入れると、集団からはじき飛ばされる人が出ちゃますよね。このフィルは打楽器が担当するものだと思うので、当然、そういう感じで演奏されてますから。でも同時に、淀みない流れというものも、そこにはありますからね。 

 

23:58 

RS 

Awesome pattern, awesome feel, you can use it in like tons of different places.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

本当にスゴイパターンだし、とっても良い感じだよね。皆さんも超いっぱい色々な場面で使えるはずです。 

 

ST 

“Tons!” Yeah.  

サラ・サワー 

「超いっぱい」そのとおりですよ! 

 

24:02 

RS 

Cool. Let's move on to the 6/8 patterns we had going on here.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

それじゃあ、今度は6/8拍子を試してみよう。 

 

ST 

Yes.  

サラ・サワー 

はい。 

 

RS 

Yeah, some really cool stuff with that. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

これは本当にカッコいいよね。 

 

24:08 

ST 

Yes. So the first 6/8 pattern, Number 9, is going to be variation of a 6/8 groove in a “Garba” setting. So I'm just going to quickly say what “Garba” is.  

サラ・サワー 

そうね。それじゃあ、最初の6/8のパターンは、#9。6/8の変化したもので「ガルバ」です。ちょっと「ガルバ」について説明しますね。 

 

“Garba” stems from ... Sorry. “Garba” is a dance that is very popular in the Gujarati tradition, and it is if people dance the “Garba,” the dance in a festival, a nine-day festival called “Navaratri,” and it happens once a year.  

「ガルバ」の大本は…間違えました、「ガルバ」っていうのはダンスの一種で、インドのグジャラート州ナヴラトリに伝わる、誰もがよく知っているものです。皆でこの「ガルバ」を、お祭り、9日間続くお祭りで、「ナヴラトリ」ていうんですけど、年に1度のお祭なんです。 

 

24:38 

One thing I'd like to mention is that “Garba” involves like thousands of people dancing, and there's a lot of percussionists that come together and play this rhythm together, play these rhythms together.  

ここでお伝えしたいのが、「ガルバ」には、何千人もの人達が踊りに加わっていて、打楽器を演奏する人達も沢山いて、皆で一緒にこのリズムを、一緒に演奏するんです。 

 

24:50 

What I'd also like to say is that drum kit traditionally is not involved in this genre at all. So I'm going to be using the toms because the percussion instrument that is really used is called the Khol. 

言いたいのは、この手の音楽をやる時は、今までだとドラムセットなんか使わないんですが、今はトムを使ってやってみます。実際使われる打楽器が「コール」っていう楽器だからです。 

 

25:02 

And that is like a gigantic barrel drum that you wear around your neck, and there's a low side and there's a high side so that sound can be emulated again with a tom. So let's, let's give it a listen  

これは超大きな樽太鼓みたいなもので、首周りに引っ掛けて、両側に皮が貼ってあって、高い音と低い音とがあります。これって、ドラムセットだとトムで真似できますよね。とにかく聴いてみてください。 

 

RS 

Sounds good 

[Music] 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

やっちゃってください。 

(演奏) 

 

25:53 

ST 

What I wrote down for this exercise is that having the high hat open and then closed. Again that's imitating the bells,  some conjuring of it. OK? 

サラ・サワー 

このレッスンでは、ハイハットのオープン/クローズを繰り返すのを、作ってみました。これも、ベルとかそういったものを思い起こさせます。こんな感じでいい? 

 

26:00 

RS 

Yeah, cool. Let's move on to the variation Number 10.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

勿論、いいよ。さあ、次は#10に行こうか。 

 

ST 

Yes! So the variation number 10, it's called the “Dadra” groove. “Dadra” is a “Tala,” which is a rhythmic cycle and it is a sixth beat cycle. This “Tala” is so beautiful because it's played in styles called “Ghazal” and a bunch of beautiful romantic songs with beautiful melodies.  

サラ・サワー 

ええ!次の#10は「ダードラ」というリズムの組み合わせです。「ダードラ」は、「ターラ」といって6拍一区切りのビートを持っています。この「ターラ」はすごくきれいで、「ガーザル」ていう演奏方法でやるんですけど、ロマンチックな歌が、すごくきれいなメロディ付きで演奏されます。 

 

The “Bol” for the “Dadra” are “Dha Dhi Na / Na Ti Na.” 

「ダードラ」のボルは「ダー、ディー、ナー/ナー、ティー、ナー」です。 

 

26:36 

What we're going to experiment with this variation is a “Theka.” A “Theka” is a variation in a rhythmic pattern that comes from the “Tala.” And the “Bols” for this are “Dha Tin Tin / Ta Dhin Dhin.” 

これからこれで「テカ」というのをやってみます。「テカ」というのは「ターラ」から発生したリズムパターンの変化形です。「テカ」のボルは「ダー、ティン、ティン/ター、ディン、ディン」です。 

 

26:53 

So let's take that and voice that on the kit. And it's going to be ... We're going to play like a ballad style.  

それじゃあ、これをドラムセットで、音程差を付けてやってみましょう。バラードっぽいやり方でいきますね。 

 

27:00 

So “Dha” on the “Dadra” is played with the bass and the right hand. So on the kit, base kick, hand ... right hand, your snare. “Dhin” is kind of more of an open sound but also has the bass and the high, so we'll keep the kick and the snare there as well.  

「ダードラ」の「ダー」は、コールでは、低い音のでる皮でやります。ですから、ドラムセットだとバスドラム、それと、右手でスネアドラム。「ディン」は、開いた音ですが、同時に低い響きと高い響きがあるので、バスドラムとスネアドラムを同時に叩くんです。 

 

27:19 

Then we got “Tin.” “Tin” is a beautiful ringing sound. I would say, it's not as powerful as “Dha.” So “Tin” maybe “mf” (mezzo forte). We got a cross-stick going on. We can use that. Then we have “Ta,” which is like “Bam!” in your face. So we're gonna put on the snare.  

それから「ティン」ですけど、「ティン」ていうのは、鈴がなるようなきれいな音です。私的には、「ダー」と同じくらい、強い存在感があるものです。ですから「ティン」はメゾフォルテかな。ここでもクロス・スティック奏法を使い続けます。奏法上は可能ですから。それと「ター」ですが、これは顔を「バン!」て感じなので、スネアドラムでやります。 

 

OK. So let's just try playing it.  

それじゃあ、ちょっとやってみましょうね。 

 

RS 

Cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いきましょう。 

 

ST 

All right. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

はい。 

(演奏) 

 

28:09 

RS 

Cool! Again very versatile groove you could use in like many different places.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイ!これもまた、色々応用が効くリズムの組み合わせだね。沢山色々な場面で使えそう。 

 

28:14 

ST 

And, you know, when you hear like gospel music, there's a lot of beautiful play on the hi-hat. So a lot of “Tabla” players, when they're playing this style and this “Ta,” they're kind of following the vocalist and the other instrumentations.  

サラ・サワー 

それとですね、ゴスペルっぽい音楽を聞くと、ハイハットをきれいに聞かせているのがあります。タブラを叩く人達の多くが、この演奏方法、この「ター」をやる時は、歌い手と、自分以外の楽器奏者達を、ある意味フォローするように叩くんです。 

 

28:25 

So they do a lot of beautiful subtleties and ghost notes and melodic lines on the “Tabla.” So I, kind of, steal all their lines, and I do it on the hi-hat while keeping, kind of, these two consistent.  

なので、ここではタブラには、スゴくきれいなやりかたで、かすかな音だったり、音をほとんど鳴らさないやり方だったり、メロディみたいなフレーズも叩くんです。このやり方を、私はある意味盗む形で、ハイハットを使っています。 

 

RS 

Awesome!  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

いいじゃない! 

 

28:37 

ST 

So a lot of room to play around.  

サラ・サワー 

これは色々周りに肉付けする余地が、沢山あるのよ。 

 

RS 

Cool. That's really cool.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイ、本当にスゴイ。 

 

ST 

Yeah.  

サラ・サワー 

でしょ。 

 

RS 

Let's move on to Number 11.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

次は#11だね。 

 

ST 

So this is one of my favorite grooves. It's a fun, a vibe, a fun 6/8 kind of groove. And this can be applied into a “Garba” setting, you know, Bollywood songs, anything. So let's check it out. 

[Music] 

サラ・サワー 

これが私の大好きなリズムの組み合わせなんです。楽しいし、ゾクゾクするし、楽しい感じのする6/8のリズムの組み合わせです。これは「ガルバ」に当てはめることが出来ます。インド映画の「ボリウッド」だったりとか、何でもいけます。聴いてみましょうか。 

(演奏) 

 

29:27 

RS 

Awesome! There's some really awesome grooves, and a couple of nice fills that you've shown us. So thank you so much for sharing that.  

ルーベン・スパイカー 

スゴイ!本当にスゴイリズムの組み合わせだね。あとイケてるフィルが2つ3つやってくれたね。今日は本当にありがとう。 

 

29:37 

So, yeah, I think, now you mentioned you're gonna play a track and you're gonna show us basically how ... you can start using this in like, you know, a different setting other than any music, how you can start applying it.  

それじゃあ、これから1曲やってもらうと言ってくれたけど、基本的にその…皆さんも、ある意味色々他の場面で、どんな音楽にでも、当てはめる方法があるから、使い始めてみてください。 

 

29:47 

But, before we do that, do you have anything else you wanted to add?  

でもその前に、何か言っておきたいことある? 

 

29:51 

ST 

I would just say one thing. It's that when I'm trying to learn grooves or licks or tops or whatever it may be sometimes I feel like the habit is to get the sticking and just shed it until you get it and maybe try and squeeze it into everything that you do.  

サラ・サワー 

1つだけ良いかな。私が今までやったことのないリズムの組み合わせとか、ちょこっと間に入れるものとか、出だしに添えるものとか、そういうのを身に着けようとする時は、何でもそうですけど、習慣づけているのが、スティックの使い方を、今までの古いやり方を捨てて、新しいのを身に着けて、場合によっては身につけたものも更に絞り込んで、自分ができるように何でも持っていくことです。 

 

30:07 

What I have learned and continue to do is try and hear it in a musical setting and then knowing when and where and how and why to add it in, because when we were going through the different ride variations or hi-hat variations, it wasn't like a technical exercise like from the new breed or something like that.  

私が学んだことで、今でも続けているのは、今までやったことのないことを身に着けようとする時は、その音楽を使って何かをしているという状況を試してみたり、聞いてみたりして、それが、いつ、どんな状況で、どんな風に、添えられているのか、その理由も知るようにしています。結局、学んだことを、今までと違うライドシンバルの変化形とか、ハイハットの変化形とかを使うときに、新種のたぐいのものから技術的なものだけもらうとか、そんなんじゃないんですよ。 

 

30:26 

There was a purpose for each and every ghost note and every hit in my mind I'm hearing the song. So I would recommend ... if you'd like to dig into these grooves, check them out, look up character, look up different variations, and understand the grooves.  

音をほとんど鳴らさない部分には、どれもそれぞれに目的があります。私が一つ一つ叩く音には、それぞれ頭の中で、それを鳴らして聞いているんです。ですからオススメしたいのが…こういうリズムの組み合わせを深堀りする時は、性格を理解して色々な変化形を探して確認して、そうやってそのリズムの組み合わせを把握しましょう、てことです。 

 

RS 

Thank you again for coming out. This is an amazing lesson. 

ルーベン・スパイカー 

今日はありがとう。本当に素晴らしいレッスンだったよ。 

 

30:46 

(to the viewers) And make sure you come check out Drumeo. Check out all the other stuff we're going to be filming. We got an amazing course with like 15 of these grooves. 

皆さん「Drumeo」のサイトのチェックと、これから配信する動画のチェックもお忘れなく。こう言ったリズムの組み合わせの、本当に素晴らしいレッスン動画が15本とかありますから。 

 

30:51 

We'll go way more in depth with this and everything. So ...  

今後更に深堀りしてゆきます。全部ね。それでは… 

 

30:55 

ST 

Yeah. The next song is by Kaz Rodriguez's shout out. It's called “GAIA.” 

["GAIA" by Kaz Rodriguez] 

サラ・サワー 

はい、このあとお送りしますのは、カズ・ロドリゲスのシャウトアウトで、「GAIA」です。 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifDJgNlg3sc 

サラ・サワーと、日本の若きエース川口千里とのcoolなセッションです♪ 

Senri Kawaguchi & Sarah Thawer Drum-Off 

20190817 

 

英日対訳:エヴァン・コール(米・作曲)2023インタビュー:作曲~ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hilteZ9RYBw 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Gavin Leeper 

2023.11.22 

 

Gavin Leeper 

Hey guys! So this past October, I finally got to visit Japan for the first time since COVID. One of my favorite parts of the trip was having the honor of visiting Evan Call’s home  studio, and interviewing him about his career.  

ギャヴィン・リーパー 

皆さん、こんにちは。先月、10月にようやくコロナ禍以降初めて、日本にやってきました。今回の訪日では、色々楽しみにしていたことがありますが、その中の1つ、エヴァン・コールのスタジオがある自宅にお邪魔して、彼の仕事についてインタビューすることができました。 

 

Evan is an American composer living in Japan. He is probably most famous among anime fans for writing the music for a series called “Violet Evergarden.”  

エヴァンはアメリカの作曲家で、現在は日本に滞在中です。彼の作曲家としての知名度は、アニメ「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」のシリーズで音楽を手掛けたことが、大変良く知られています。 

 

He’s recently gotten more mainstream fame in Japan for writing the music for the 2022 NHK historical samurai drama “The 13 Lords of The Shogun”.  

この程彼は、日本の作曲シーンの大きな舞台に立ちました。2022年のNHK大河ドラマ「鎌倉殿の13人」の音楽を手掛けたのです。 

 

We got to chat about Evan’s early career, what he enjoys about writing for anime, and several other topics. If you enjoy this shorter edit of our conversation and want to watch more, the full unedited version of this interview  will be made available to my “Patreon Patrons.”  

このインタビューでは、彼が作曲家としてスタートしたばかりの頃のお話や、今現在アニメ音楽を手掛けている仕事ぶり、などなどをお聞きいただきます。この動画は短く編集した会話をご覧いただきますが、完全版の動画は、私の「Patreon Patrons」のサイトをチェックしてください。 

 

Now without further ado, here is my conversation with Evan Call. 

さあ、余計なおしゃべりはここまでにして、まずはエヴァン・コールとのインタビューをお楽しみください。 

 

Evan Call 

Hello everybody, I’m Evan Call. I’m an American composer living and working in Japan, and Gavin came out here all the way to Japan to visit me and talk about music. 

エヴァン・コール 

皆さん、こんにちは。エヴァン・コールです。僕はアメリカ出身の作曲家ですが、現在は日本に滞在して仕事をしています。今日はギャヴィンがはるばる日本へ、僕を訊ねてここへ来てくれました。音楽について、お話してゆきたいと思います。 

 

 

 

<Can you tell us about how you got your first work opportunity in Japan?> 

<日本での仕事に、初めて取り組んだきっかけを教えて下さい> 

 

 

Evan Call 

I didn’t immediately find work of course. It doesn’t always work out like that. I was living in a share house, which is with other foreigners. You could pay month per month. I  was running out of time, so I got a job as an English tutor, English teacher, at an English company here.   

エヴァン・コール 

勿論、いきなり仕事が見つかったわけではありません。そんなにいつもうまくは行くものではありません。僕はシェアハウスに住んでいました。そこには他にも、日本以外の国から来た人達が住んでいたのです。毎月家賃を払って住んでいました。もうそろそろ、もたもたしていられなくなってくる、というところで、英語を教える仕事、英語の先生ですね、これを英語系の会社でまずはやることにしたんです。 

 

But I hadn’t signed my contract yet - I was just doing the training, and I got invited to a party, and at the party - it was a lot of foreigners who were into anime and stuff.  

ただその時は、まだ入社手続きをしていなくて、単に研修期間だったんですね。それである日、パーティーに呼ばれたんです。そこにはアニメとか、そんなようなことに関係する、日本以外の人達が沢山来ていました。 

 

And I was there, and I talked to one of my roommates, friends, and she said “Hey, what do you want to do in Japan?”  

そこに居て、僕はルームメイトの1人に声をかけたんです。そしたら彼女は、「それで、あなたは日本でどんな仕事をしたいの?」 

 

I said “I really want to be a composer.” And she said “Hey,  I have a friend who works as a composer. Why don’t you reach out to him?”  

僕は「本当は、作曲家としてやっていきたいんだよ。」すると彼女が「あら、そしたら私、作曲の仕事をしている友だちがいるから、彼を紹介してあげようか?」 

 

And it’s actually one of the composers at my company where I initially was working at where I was hired as an assistant with “Elements Garden.” And through that connection I had several different interviews and several different challenges, like, “Let’s see how your music is,” or “Can you do this and do this?”  

実はその人は、僕が「エレメンツ・ガーデン」という会社のアシスタントで雇ってもらっていた、最初に仕事をしていた会社の、作曲家さん達の1人だったんです。その繋がりから、面接をいくつか受けて、色々テストも受けました「君の考える音楽のことを聞かせて」とか「これはどう?あれはどう?」とかね。 

 

And so lots of different kinds of little tests. A lot of “Mimi-Kopi” (Ear Copy), so you listen to their song, “Okay. Now totally resequence the whole song, make it better and tell me why you changed it.”  

とにかく沢山、色々なテストを受けましたね。「耳コピ」とかね。曲を聞かされて「それじゃあ、今まで聞いたものをつなぎ合わせて、一つの曲にしてください。その上で、あなたなりに、この方が良い、という風に変えてみてください。理由も付けてね。」 

 

Like an orchestral song, I resequenced the whole thing and then I wrote my notes about “Well, I changed this because this,” or “I changed this because this.” And that's kind of how I want about it.  

管弦楽曲みたいな感じで、僕は継ぎ変えて1曲に仕上げました。そうして音符を書くにあたって、「こういう理由で変えました」みたいなことを、自分が良いと思ったことを伝えたんです。 

 

GL 

Wasn’t at a maid cafe somewhere? 

ギャヴィン・リーパー 

受験先は、メイドカフェか何か? 

 

EC 

No! Unfortunately not. 

エヴァン・コール 

残念ながら、そうじゃないよ! 

 

 

 

<What's your favorite thing about writing music for anime?> 

<アニメ音楽を手掛ける楽しみはなんですか?> 

 

 

EC 

One reason I also pursued anime music is because I can have fun. I could do all kinds of different things without being restricted. They want you to not stand out too much a lot of times, especially in contemporary film scoring. 

エヴァン・コール 

アニメ音楽を追求してみようと思った理由は、いくつかありますが、一つには、僕自身が楽しめるから、というのがあります。制限なしに、あらゆることを試すことが出来ます。あまり勝手にやらないで、ということも沢山あります。とくに現代風の映画音楽を作る場合はそうですね。 

 

There’s a few scores, of course, where it’s the exception to what I could imagine the rule might be these days.  

当然いくつか楽曲としては、今どきの定石と思われるものの、例外みたいなものもあります。 

 

A lot of times they want ... seem to want a little more of an ... out-of-the-way approach, which, I mean, is nice when you watch it, sounds great, but from a composer’s standpoint, I want to have fun, do something a little wild,  you know?  

よく制作側はその…定石から外れたアプローチより、みたいなものを求めてきます。つまり、出来上がったものを見たときに、すごい音となって聞こえてくるというね。でも作曲家としての立場からすれば、とにかく楽しみたい、思い切ったこともしてみたい、わかりますよね? 

 

GL 

Yeah, yeah. 

ギャヴィン・リーパー 

わかります、わかります。 

 

EC 

So, luckily in Japan there’s a lot of those kinds of opportunities to just kind of go out there. A lot of times they really appreciate it to, and they welcome it. 

エヴァン・コール 

幸い日本では、定石から外れてやってみよう、みたいな機会が沢山あります。制作側も、喜んでくれて、歓迎してくれることが、結構多いですね。 

 

GL 

Totally. 

ギャヴィン・リーパー 

全くその通りですね。 

 

 

 

<Can you describe the work-flow for working on “Violet Evergarden?> 

<「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」の制作過程について、教えて下さい> 

 

 

EC 

Well, we started with the TV series, and before I was actually hired onto the job, I had to do a demo first, ended up being the theme of “Violet Evergarden,” the name of the song, the one with the typewriter.  

エヴァン・コール 

そうですね、TVシリーズから始めて、僕は本採用になる前に、まずデモを用意しなくてはいけませんでした。結局それが「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」の主題曲であり、曲名もそのままで、タイプライターを演奏に用いるものです。 

 

The typewriter has been used as an instrument in the past in an orchestral setting. So I thought, “Hey, that’s a pretty good idea. Let me steal it!”  

タイプライターはこれまでに、管弦楽曲では楽器として用いられてきています。ですからここでは「いいアイデアだ、これはいただきだな!」て思いましたね。 

 

No, I mean ... It is what it is. It’s another instrument and matches the setting of the show. I actually used the sound of a quill in that song as well too.  

まあ、それはともかく、そんな感じです。通常用いない特別な楽器として、番組の設定にもピッタリなんですよ。あとは曲中では、羽ペンで音を鳴らす、そういうのも使用しています。 

 

The way anime is scored in Japan is ... You have a meeting with the main staff, the director, producers, and sound director.  

日本のアニメ音楽の楽譜の書き方は…メインのスタッフさん達と話し合いをするのですが、ディレクター、プロデューサー、それから音響監督ともです。 

 

He’s the one who makes the menu for what songs he wants you to write. For “Violet Evergardens'” TV series, I got the menu, and it was one of the most confusing menus I’ve ever had.  

作曲者に、自分の希望を書いたメモを渡すのです。「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」のTVシリーズでもらったメニューは、僕のキャリアの中では、一番頭が混乱するようなもののひとつでしたね。 

 

A lot of times they have ... pretty straightforward thing like “Nichi-jo 1,” “Nchi-jo 2.” So that's the kind of “every day life 1,” “every day life 2.” Maybe it’ll be like “Batoru,” “battle 1,” “battle 2,” that kind of setting where the title is super-clear about what direction they’re going for.  

とにかくやたらと、ポーンと書いてくるだけ、例えば「日常1」「日常2」。あるいは「バトル1」「バトル2」、これを日本語で書いてくるわけです。ある意味、タイトルはめちゃくちゃわかりやすいですし、どんな方向性なのかも、めちゃくちゃわかりやすいですしね。 

 

But for the “Violet Evergarden” movie, the sound director, I think his intention was to make me think, like, deeper about the music, which I actually really prefer to do.  

でも「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」の、劇場版については、音楽監督が、彼の意思だと思うのですが、僕自身がより深く音楽について思いを巡らせてほしい、と思っていたようです。実際その方が、僕も望むところです。 

 

And so the menu I got, it was very abstract kinds of titles. It was like “Existence as Existence.” All right, really weird things like that, like “Wow! What does that mean?” you know. 

メニューを受け取ったら、やたらと曖昧なタイトルばかりついているんですよ。例えば「存在としての存在」とかね、まあいいわ、本当に変だわ、みたいな感じで「おいおい、これどういう意味だよ」、わかりますよね? 

 

So I had to, like, look at these kind of ... hard to understand titles and see, “Okay, here’s my interpretation of what that means, and I don’t think he (sound director) particularly was expecting a specific direction or not.” 

ですから、そんな感じのばかりをじっと見ていて…タイトルが理解に苦しむわけですよ、それで「まあいいや、僕なりに意味を解釈しよう。どうせ音楽監督さんも、特に何か、ハッキリとした方向性を期待しているわけではないだろう」とね。 

 

He probably just wants me to think deeply about it and write nice music or something.  

僕にとにかく深く思いを巡らせて、いい音楽みたいなものを書いてほしい、そう望んでいたと思うんです。 

 

Of course at that time I know the story,  I know what’s going to happen in the story because I have the script, and so I can't ... There’s no chance of me getting way off. 

当然その時点で、ストーリーは把握しています。スクリプトもありましたし、こうなったら、もう逃げられませんよ。 

 

 

<How is this different from the process of writing music for a film?> 

<映画音楽を作る過程との違いは、何ですか?> 

 

 

For the film, it’s all scored to picture, which means I get a vision of the film, it’s all still black and white. There’s no  color. “Violet Evergardens” animation was actually pretty smoothly done at the time, at times it can be real rough; the characters may just be circles with dots for eyes and a little smiley face or something.  

映画音楽というのは、映像にあわせて楽譜を書きます。つまり、映画の映像をもらって作る、その時点ではまだ白黒です。色はまだ入っていません。「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」のアニメーションは、かなりスムーズに、当時は制作されていました。時々大雑把に、丸だけ書いて、目は点で、ちょっとだけ笑った顔、みたいな感じなことも、ありました。 

 

But for the “Violet Evergarden” film, it was done enough that I could clearly see what was happening on the screen. 

ですが劇場版の方は、完璧に仕上げられていて、進行はハッキリと把握することが出来ていました。 

 

Generally the standard is to have the voice recordings done for the voice actors and voice actresses, because if there’s no dialogue, I have to reference the script, of course, but it’s harder to write music without the dialogue.  

一般的には声優さんや、女性の声優さん達が、録音を済ませるところまでは持っていっています。なぜなら、会話がないと、台本をいちいち見ないといけないからです。当然ですよね。ですが、会話の音声がないと、曲を書くのは、それだけで困難な要素が増えてしまいます。 

 

If I’m writing to that particular scene because I want to hear they say this word, “Okay.” Now the music reacts to it or the music anticipates it or something like this.  

彼らに「これでいいですよ」と言ってもらいたいじゃないですか、そのシーンの音楽を書こうとするならね。そうなると、音楽が言葉に反応して、あるいは、それを見越した音楽になる、そんな感じです。 

 

So it’s better to have it there. I’ve had situations where I ask the sound director if there’s no dialogue yet to just record part of the film with him or staff or whatever.   

ですから、在ったほうが良いわけです。こんな事がよくありました。音響監督に、セリフの声が入ったものはないのかと訊ねると、監督やそのスタッフさん達などで、その部分を演ってくれるんです。 

 

And now they’ll give me a rough one with their voices on it. Just ... So I know the timings. That always helps too.  

そんな感じで、彼らの声でですけれど、大まかなものを用意してくれるんですよ。これで色々なタイミングが把握できるので、いつも助かっています。 

 

But for “Violet Evergarden,” it was all recorded and all ready for me to score. 

ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」については、声優さんの声は全部用意された状態で、僕も楽譜を書くことが出来ました。 

 

 

<Violet Evergarden's woodwind writing is a highlight of the soundtrack. How did you approach this aspect?> 

木管楽器の使い方が「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデン」のサントラの見せ場とも言えます。この辺りどのように取り組んだのか、教えて下さい> 

 

 

EC 

When I was writing the music, I kind of wanted a woodwind-centric kind of score. With strings and woodwinds, of course, there’s brass, all that stuff, too.  

今回譜面を書くにあたっては、木管楽器を中心に据えたいと思っていたんです。もちろん、木管楽器だけでなくて、弦楽器、金管楽器、といった、普通に使う楽器全部ですけどね。 

 

But I think for melodies I’m using a lot of woodwinds. And the reason why I do that is because woodwinds have a more of a feminine feel to them, a softer gentler tone, and to represent the story of “Violet Evergarden.”  

ただ、メロディに関しては、木管楽器を中心に使用しています。なぜそうしたかというと、木管楽器というのは、女性的な感じ、柔らかで和やかな響き、これこそが「ヴァイオレット・エヴァーガーデンのストーリーを物語るものです。 

 

And I kind of wanted that soft feminine tone to it, as well. As ... I think also woodwinds are a good representation of that innocence, and not naivety but kind of like a pureness.   

ですから何ていうか、この柔らかで女性的な響きと、あと…同時に木管楽器というのは、純潔とか、清廉とか、そういうイメージだけでではなくて、純粋さと言ったようなものもあると思うんです。 

 

And for her having in a story being like a basically a war orphan, I don’t know, did you see? 

登場人物の女性は、戦争孤児みたいなものです、確か、君は映画を見た? 

 

But I mean she doesn’t know where she came from necessarily. But she didn’t grow up normally, and she doesn’t function normally in society.   

自分の出生がわからない、平凡な人生を過ごして成長してきていない、社会の中でぎこちなくしか居られない。 

 

Generally when I’m writing, it’s (like,) “I think this instrument sounds best for this type of melody.” So if it’s an oboe, I think, “Well, the oboe has that nice kind of piercing tone especially when they got a nice vibrato on it too,” (or) kind of like “Oh, that’s really nice.”  

だいたい僕は譜面を書くときは、「このメロディにはこの楽器が良いんじゃないかな」と考えながら、やっています。それが例えばオーボエなら「そうだな、オーボエは、良い感じで刺さってくる感じがするし、特にヴィブラートを良い感じでかければ、更に良いよね。」あるいは「そうか、これは本当に良いぞ」とか。 

 

It’s a bit more of a focused sound than, let’s say, a flute or clarinet. 

フルートとかクラリネットよりも、焦点の絞れた密度の濃い音が期待できるとかね。 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyIkWqtu_JM 

 

NHK大河ドラマ「鎌倉殿の13人」オープニング音楽 

演奏:NHK交響楽団 

指揮:下野竜也 

 

英日対訳:ミハイル・プレトニョフ(露・Cond)2013「ジャンヌ・ダルクと鐘」物事は見方次第

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-AQUFvs3_8 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

2013/04/24 

"Joan and the Bells" is a cantata by composer Gordon Getty, based on the life and death of Joan of Arc.  

ジャンヌ・ダルクと鐘」は、作曲家のゴードン・ゲッティが、ジャンヌ・ダルクの生涯とその最後をもとにしたカンタータです。 

 

 

Gordon Getty 

I make ...  I made a pash tubler bells. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

今回は、チャイムを激しく鳴らす手法を使ったんですよ。 

 

Mikhail Pletnev 

What sources do ... did you use? 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

そのアイデアの、もとは何なんですか? 

 

Gordon Getty 

Oh, I use them all. I, I sort of I'd really use everything on the time. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

何だって使いますよ。その時その場にあるものは、ある意味何だって使うんですよ。 

 

[music] 

 

MP 

Are there many sources ...  

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

もとになるものは、沢山あると… 

 

GG 

Yeah. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

そうですね。 

 

MP 

... that you can do? Reliable or not?  

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

使えるものはね。そういうものに頼るということですか? 

 

GG 

Well, of course not a reliable. Mine is not reliable with this exception that I try not to ... say, anything that couldn't be true in the view to the history. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

勿論、ずっと当てにする、なんてことはしません。私の考えもね。ただ、例外としてしないように、というか … 歴史上ありえないことについて思いついた場合は、これは全部「当てに」しましたね。 

 

MP 

Because this,... I would say “mystical” with the bells. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

というのはですね、この…チャイムは「神秘的」と申し上げたい。 

 

GG 

Of course, and made up entirely, made up by me. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

そうです、全部、私が思いついたものです。 

 

MP 

Symbolical, yes. It's not in Tchaikovsky that the bells .... 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

象徴的ですよね。チャイコフスキーの作品にも、こんなチャイムは… 

 

GG 

No, no. It's just my own idea, of course. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

ないです、ないですよ。私だけのアイデアですよ、当然でしょ。 

 

MP 

It's your own idea.  

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

あなただけのアイデアですか。 

 

GG 

My own idea, as far as I know. Of course it's so appropriate to have the tubular bells doing that. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

私の知る限りね。勿論、チャイムにこんなことをさせるのは、極めて適切なやり方でしょう。 

 

 

[music] 

 

 

MP 

Well, there is a opinion, there is no atonal music at all. There's not exist. Atonal music in the proper sense is senseless music, because tonality can be understood like ... when others know the point of weight. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

調性のない音楽なんてない、という意見があります。そんなものは存在しない。調性のない音楽というのは、適切な意味で言えば、音楽として意味を成していないもの、ということになります。だって、調性というものは、音の中心がどこにあるか、聴く側が気づけば、それで判ってもらえるからです。 

 

It can be C major chord. It can be in ... described in other cord. It can be so construction.  

ハ長調のコードだったり、場合によっては…他のコードで言い表すことも可能です。コードはそんな風に組み立てることが出来るのです。。 

 

But then if there are no tonality ... tonality is this ... gravity, you know, it is what is important, it is less important, what is strong.... 

ですが、調性なんてものがないということになると…調性というのは、どこに重きを置くか、でしょう。何が大事なのか、何が副次的なものか、何を強く表現するか… 

 

GG 

Yeah! I agree! That's my feeling! 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

そうそう、大賛成、私の考えそのものですよ! 

 

MP 

I think everything is tonal, depends how it's understood. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

調性というものは、捉え方によりますが、何にだって存在するものだと思います。 

 

 

 

[solo by Lisa Delan, soprano, Russian National Orchestra, Yurlov State Academic Choir] 

ソプラノ独唱:リサ・デラン、管弦楽:ロシア国立交響楽団、合唱:ユルロフ国立アカデミー合唱団 

 

 

MP 

When we speak about contemporary music, what is contemporary? You know, the music has already gone all its way from scratch to scratch ... with chemistry, to just abusive noises. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

現代音楽というものについて言うなら、そもそも現代音楽とは何か、ということになります。音楽というものは既にずっと歴史を経て、全く何もないところから、また何もなかった頃へと、化学反応を起こしてみたり、単なる汚らしい雑音まで色々ですよ。 

 

It was the beginning in some pre-historical era when people were using the drums. And then it was developed the world of music than the tonal system and then it went back, the spiral, the circles not finished.  

音楽というものは、有史以前の、人類が叩いて鳴らす楽器を使っていた時代にまでさかのぼります。そこから発展していって、調性音楽を超えた音楽の世界に至って、そしてまたもとへ戻る、歴史は繰り返す、ぐるぐる回る、終わりがないものです。 

 

So if we ... if people think... if you write music just only using the scratches and ugly sounds at a modern music, No! It's already old music. It was done fifty years ago or even more. 

そう考えるとですね、単にガリガリやっているような音や耳障りな音を、「現代音楽」として使っても、違うんですよ!それはもう昔の音楽なんですよね。50年とかそれ以上前の音楽なんですよね。 

 

 

[solo bybKonstantin Shushakov, baritone] 

 

 

Konstantin Shushakov (in Russian) 

コンスタンティン・シュシャコフ(ロシア語) 

It's not the first time I am singing modern music. It's not traditional classical music, so it's difficult for vocalists to perform.  

現代音楽を歌うのは、初めてというわけではありません。よくあるパターンを踏襲しているクラシック音楽ではないので、歌手にとっては難しい演奏になります。 

 

But as I learned this part, and listened to the recording, it began to make sense for me.  

それでも、自分のパートをものにしてゆくうちに、録音したものを聴いているうちに、自分にとって理解できるものになりはじめましたね。 

 

 

[solo by Konstantin Shushakov] 

 

 

MP 

So I think when every time I talk to, I see you have your own world of ideas. It doesn't matter what is going on. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

あなたと会って話をすると、ご自分の世界をしっかりと持っておられるのがわかります。外野で何が起きていようと、おかまいなし、ですよね。 

 

GG 

Exactly. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

おっしゃるとおりです。 

 

MP 

The history of the fine arts, music, paintings, poetry ... it's your work and not everybody can really be brave enough to to be like this. But that ... Gordon is not from this planet. 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

美術や音楽、絵画、詩、そういうものの歴史を見てみると…この曲は、あなたならではのものです。こんな風に大胆にできる人間は、そうそういません。それにしても…ゴードンは宇宙人ですな。 

 

 

<at the rehearsal> 

GG 

Make sure be known.  

<合奏練習中> 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

これちゃんと周知して。 

 

MP 

Here should be, uh ...  

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

ここはきちんと、その… 

 

GG 

Make sure be known. Make sure that bull-shit know. 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

ちゃんと周知して、このアホくさいの、周知してな。 

 

MP 

Let this to ... 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

これをやるように… 

 

GG 

Thank you! Hah, Hah! 

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

じゃ、ありがとな! 

 

 

<back to interview> 

 

MP 

A lot of music that ... the very genius keeps pick up what he needs, and then he creates something of just a different level of value.  

ミハイル・プレトニョフ 

音楽作品の多くで…優秀な作曲家は、自分が必要とするものをピックアップして、そして桁違いのレベルのものを、今までにないものを生み出すのです。 

 

GG 

You are really good as a pianist and as a conductor really good. This guy's so good that if he wants to do it at some way that I didn't mean, I've tended to given him since then! 

ゴードン・ゲッティ 

あなたは本当にピアノ奏者としても指揮者としても、優秀だからね。本当に優秀ですよ。ですから、私の意図しないことを、彼がやりたいと言ったら、そこからは、彼に主導権を渡しちゃいますよ! 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh3BrctmREw 

 

The ever-reliable Anna Chekhova introducing Mikhail Pletnev at the 1978 Tchaikovsky competition winners' concert. Pletnev played Tchaikovsky's unfinished Allegro in F minor and three pieces he transcribed from the Nutcracker.