【英日対訳】ミュージシャン達の言葉what's in their mind

ミュージシャン達の言葉、書いたものを英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:サミュエル・バーバー(米・作曲)CBS(1958)バレエ「メディア」:決めては「ブギウギ」

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swfNLEo88Pg 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Interview with Samuel Barber by James Fassett (CBS), NY Philharmonic concert intermission, March 16, 1958 at Carnegie Hall. 

 

 

James Fassett 

Well, welcome home, Sam Barber, after your highly successful playing on the stage of the Metropolitan. How does it seem to be back on home ground on the concert stage again?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

今日は本拠地でのインタビューです。おかえりなさい、サミュエル・バーバーさん。メトロポリタン歌劇場での公演は大成功でしたね。今日はここ(カーネギーホールの)演奏会用ホールに戻っていらっしゃったということで、いかがですか? 

 

Samuel Barber 

Very happy, of course, to be back with the Philharmonic. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

勿論、嬉しいですよ。ニューヨーク・フィルハーモニックの皆さんとも再会できましたしね。 

 

JF 

Sam, how many performances of Vanessa were there in all in the series?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

サムさん、歌劇「ヴァネッサ」の公演ですが、結局何回ほどになりますか? 

 

SB 

I think there were seven or eight at the Metropolitan. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

メトロポリタン歌劇場では7回、8回といったところでしょうか。 

 

JF 

Did you attend all of them?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

全部ご覧になったんですか? 

 

SB 

Yes I did.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

見ましたよ。 

 

JF 

No trouble getting tickets by yourself. 

ジェームス・ファセット 

ご自分の作品の公演ですから、チケットは大丈夫ですよね。 

 

SB 

Well, not for me. I was able to sneak around. But an amusing thing did happen at the last performance. I wanted to hear an understudy, and I didn't want to sit down all evening.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

それが、私のチケットは取っていなかったんですよ。まあ、コソコソ入り込むことは出来ましたけどね。でもね、チョット面白いことがあったんですよ。最終公演の時だったんですけどね、代役の方が出ていたので、聴きたかったんですよ。それで、ずっと最後までは嫌だな、と思って。 

 

So I went around from the stage and asked an usher if I could have a seat. He told me “Well, no.”  

それで、グルっと回って舞台から客席に行ったんです。そして案内係の方に、座っていいか訊ねたんですね。そうしたら「それはご容赦ください。」 

 

And I looked through the door of the theater, and saw one could be very good for me because I could run away when I didn't want to hear anymore. And I asked if I could had that vacant one. 

それで、ドアの隙間から客席を見てみると、頃合いの場所が空いているんですよ。途中で聴きたくなくなったら、出ていけるような場所がね。それで、案内係の方に、あそこは座っては駄目なのか、と訊ねたんです。 

 

JF 

Yeah  

ジェームス・ファセット 

なるほどね。 

 

SB 

And he said, “Who are you?” And I said, “I am the composer.” And he said, “Oh, of course! I'll take you in.” And he took me inside and said, “We'd like you to have this seat, we want you to be very comfortable, Mr. Britten.” 

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうしたら「お客様は、どちら様ですか?」と言うので、「私は作曲者ですよ」と応えたら「そうでしたか、それでは勿論お掛けください。ご案内いたしましょう」それで、ホール内へ案内してくださったんです。そして「どうぞ、こちらです。おくつろぎくださいませ、ブリテン様。」 

 

JF 

The tune of “Vanessa” by “Benjamin Barber.” (laugh) 

ジェームス・ファセット 

(笑)歌劇「ヴァネッサ」、作曲者「ベンジャミン・バーバー」ですな。 

 

Sam, let's get down to the matter of the day, “Medea's Meditation and Dance of Vengeance.” The form in which we'll hear it this afternoon is not the form in which you originally wrote the score, is it?  

さて、サムさん、今日の本題に入りましょう。「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」です。今日の午後にこれから聞きますのは、原曲であなたが書いた譜面とは、違う版とのことですが。 

 

SB 

I know. It has three transitions.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうなんです。この曲には3つの版があるんです。 

 

You know, sometimes a composer cannot choose exactly, perhaps due to circumstances beyond his control, the exact form and exact medium that he wants to write in at the beginning.  

作曲家というのは、自分の力の及ばないところで、周辺状況のせいで、一番最初に、これだと思う形式や楽器編成を選べない場合が、時々あるんです。 

 

In the first version of “Medea,” I was asked to write for eleven instruments, and as I was very honored and happy to write for Martha Graham, who danced the part of Medea.  

「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」の第1版は、11の楽器のためにと、ご依頼をいただきました。マーサ・グラハムさんがメディアの役で踊ってくださる、というので、私としては大変光栄に思って、喜んで譜面を書かせていただこうと思いました。 

 

I accepted this and it was performed that way, but actually a work which is sometimes as frenzied as this.  

依頼をお受けして、そのとおりに上演されました。ただ実際この作品は、時にとてつもなく凶暴な雰囲気を醸し出す作品です。 

 

The first version needs percussion, which I didn't have, and so I rearranged it after a couple of years for ballet orchestra using the percussion I wanted. 

本当は第1版で打楽器が必要だと思ったんですが、書きませんでした。なので、数年後に書き直したのが、通常バレエを上演する際の管弦楽の編成で、私が使いたかった打楽器もそこに入れました。 

 

JF 

Was this for particular performance, or new performance?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

それは、何か特定の目的で?それとも、それが現在ある最新版ですか? 

 

SB 

No, it seemed to me at that time that would be the form ... It was for normal ballet orchestra, and that is bigger than, the much bigger than the original version, but not as big as the one you will hear today.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

最新版ではありません。第1版を書き直したときには、通常の規模と編成のバレエを上演する際の管弦楽の編成で、確かに第1版よりは遥かに大きな編成です。でも今日これからお聞きいただきます編成よりは、大きくはありません。 

 

JF 

Was the second version for larger orchestra ever performed other than the Martha Graham performance? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

その第2版というのは、マーサ・グラハムさん以外の方で上演されたんですか? 

 

SB 

Yes. I saw that one danced in Germany with a very large ballet at the Opera House in Cologne, and that has been used.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうです。ドイツのケルン歌劇場で、かなり大きなバレエ団が、第2版を使ってくれています。 

 

It's rather amusing. A record was sent to me by a German disour (=story teller) Hilde Leonard, who recites this.  

なかなか興味深いですよ。その時のレコードを送ってくださった方がいるんですよ。セリフの朗読をしてくださったヒルデ・レオナルドさんです。 

 

JF 

This record here? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

今この放送席にあるレコードですね。 

 

SB 

Yes, with symphony orchestra in the German translation of the Greek.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうです。通常編成の管弦楽伴奏に、ギリシャ語をドイツ語に翻訳したものを使用しています。 

 

JF 

It would be amusing to hear a bit of the German translation. Where should we put it? On this part?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

ドイツ語の翻訳版とは、面白そうですね。レコードの、どの辺りでしょう?この辺ですかね? 

 

SB 

Yes, put it on there. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうです、そこに針を置いてください。 

 

[Music] 

(演奏) 

 

JF 

Somehow I think I would prefer to hear it as we'll hear at this afternoon. Were you ... 

ジェームス・ファセット 

どちらかというと、私は今日の午後聴く版の方が良いかな。あなたは…。 

 

SB 

Recitation form is not particularly popular today in America 

サミュエル・バーバー 

朗読劇というのは、今のアメリカでは、あまり人気のあるスタイルではないですね。 

 

JF 

No. 

ジェームス・ファセット 

そうですね。 

 

SB 

But apparently that was a form used very much in Germany. The recitation with a background of music. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

ですがこれは、しっかりドイツでの上演バージョンになっていますね。BGM付きの朗読劇です。 

 

JF 

Sam, you were in Greece, weren't you, at the time or just before the time you were reorganised this work?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

サムさん、この作品を書き直したときには、ギリシャにおられたとか?それとも書き直す前でしたか? 

 

SB 

Yes. I took a trip to Greece because I was marking time not only did I want to go to Greece I'd always wished to, but I was marking time to get ahead with my opera “Vanessa.” 

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうなんです。ギリシャに行ったのはですね、前から行きたかったのでということで、機会を伺っていただけでなくて、私の作品の「ヴァネッサ」を書き進めたかったから、というのもありました。 

 

I had written one scene of “Vanessa,” which is ... all the texts that (Gian Carlo) Menotti, who wrote the libretto, gave me. That was written in Maine. And just I was ready to go full steam ahead, and with the rest of the opera, Menotti told me that he had to produce his own Center Bleecker Street and there were no more words available for me to set to music.  

行く前に「ヴァネッサ」のある場面は書き終えていたんです。この作品は、セリフは全てジャン=カルロ・メノッティが私のために書いてくれたんです。この部分はメーン州で、私の方は、もうあとは全力で突っ走るだけ、という態勢だったんです。ところが、残りのセリフの部分は、彼が他にニューヨークのセントラル・ブリーカー・ストリートでの別の作品があるからといって、まだ書けていないというんです。お陰で、譜面を作るのがストップしてしまったんですよ。 

 

So I had to be very, very patient. This was at a moment in “Vanessa” where the tenor arrives, stands in a drafty doorway, very bad thing for a tenor in a northern country.  

そこからは、ひたすらじっと待たねばなりませんでした。「ヴァネッサ」の、テノール歌手が到着するところ、隙間風が入ってくる戸口まできているところです。舞台設定は北国ですから、テノール歌手には気の毒ですね。 

 

And Vanessa screams and there that poor tenor had stand for about a year until I could find Menotti was free and ready to go ahead, so at this time I chose to take a trip to Greece. I didn't want to start in any new work while I was so deep in “Vanessa.”  

そこへヴァネッサが金切り声をあげるわけですが、テノール歌手には1年間も戸口に立たされて、気の毒ですよね。とにかくメノッティが手が空いて、先を書けるようになるのを待たねばなりません。そこで私は、ギリシャに行こうとしたんです。「ヴァネッサ」にかなり打ち込んでいたので、他に新しい仕事には手を付けたくなかったんです。 

 

And it seemed a wonderful time, also because I was terribly influenced and impressed with this wonderful country to do over the “Medea.”  

本当に素晴らしい時間を過ごせたと思っています。この素晴らしいギリシャという国に、影響を受けてましたし、印象も受けましたし、「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」を書き上げるのに大いに役に立ったと思います。 

 

And the form you're going to hear today, now it's one movement and for larger orchestra.  

今日お聞きいただきますのは、単一楽章、そして管弦楽の規模も大きめです。 

 

JF 

You found you had plenty of time between sightseeing really to work on this score.  

ジェームス・ファセット 

観光と譜面を書くのと、しっかり時間が取れたということですね。 

 

SB 

Well, I just took the ordinary tourist trip around Greece and then later in the summer I took a boat and went to the islands. I was just like any tourist looking for the real Greece, which is not so easy to find.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうですね、旅行は普通にギリシャをグルっと回ってみる、というものでした。あとでその年の夏に、今度はボートを出して、島をあちこち訪ねて回ったんです。普通の旅行者と同じように、ギリシャのありのままの姿を見たくて、これって結構たやすくはないですよね。 

 

And perhaps in this work, I was looking for my idea of “Medea.”  

もしかしたら自分としては、この作品「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」に何かアイデアになるものはないか、と探していたのかもしれません。 

 

You see the Greece of the Greeks is rather elusive. We have the French idea of ancient Greece. You can see that in their reconstructions at Delphi and the sort of Beaux-Art approach at Knossus in Crete.  

つまり、ギリシャ人が「本物のギリシャとは何か」をどう見ているかについては、どちらかというと曖昧なものです。私達は古代ギリシャについては、例えばフランス人の目を通してみると、フランスによって再建されたデルフォイ神殿だの、ボザール様式の技法で再建されたクレタ島カノッサ宮殿に見て取れます 

 

Then you have the German, somewhat 19th century romantic version of Greece at Olympia. There's even an American sort of reconstruction of Greece in the Agora, the newly finished Agora in Athens.  

それからドイツ人の目を通してみるとギリシャオリンピアが19世紀(ネオ)ロマン派様式のような感じですよね。アメリ人の目を通したものもありますよね、今回新たに完了したアテネアゴラ(広場)なんかがそうです。 

 

JF 

Where are you going to find the real Greece in all this? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

「本物のギリシャ」というのは、全部、どこでどうやって見い出せば良いんですかね? 

 

SB 

All I could do was put down in on paper, my idea of Medea, in which jazz elements are mixed with archaic suggestions. And perhaps this could only be called “A contemporary West Chester County reconstruction” of this powerful old legend.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

とにかく楽譜に書くことだけでした、自分の「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」に対する思いや考えをね。ジャズの要素を、古代の雰囲気が醸し出される中に、織り交ぜようとしています。これこそ我が故郷、ウェストチェスター流の復元の仕方で、この力強い古き伝説の話を作り上げたのです。 

 

JF 

How did the jazz elements work themselves into this score? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

ジャズの要素を、どんな経緯で譜面に取り込んだのですか? 

 

SB 

Well, this was a musical procedure. I simply wanted to use a boogie-woogie rhythm because originally Martha Graham and I had thought of writing this ballet on two levels, that is the archaic, the legendary, and at the same time the contemporary, so that Medea would seem to be not only a figure of legend but a contemporary woman, and a very jealous one.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そこは音楽の組み立て方、というやつです。シンプルな気持ちでブギウギのリズムを使いたかったんです。というのも、出発の時点で、マーサ・グラハムと私とでこのバレエについて考えていたことが、2つあったんです。1つは6世紀から7世紀の古代ギリシャの雰囲気、神話や伝説の時代ですよね、それと同時に、今のこの時代の空気感も取り入れようとしたんです。そうすることで、メディアが、単に伝説上の登場人物としてだけでなく、今の時代を生きる、嫉妬深い女性という空気感も出そうとしました。 

 

JF 

What portion, Sam, of the Euripides' drama inspired you originally? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

第1版を書いた時に、あなたはエウリピデスの原作からどのくらい影響を受けましたか? 

 

SB 

Actually this verison, which you will hear today, is based on the material of the central character of the ballet of “Medea.”  

サミュエル・バーバー 

実際今日これからのお聞きいただきます版は、バレエの主役「メディア」そのものを、素材の基礎としています。 

 

You see, this piece traces her emotions from her tender feelings toward the children, begins very quietly and a sort of a chaotic style.  

つまりですね、この曲は、メディアが表に出す、心の揺れ動きを追いかけてゆくものです。最初は子供達への思いやりを、それが足音をひそませながら、ある意味混沌としたものへと移ろい始めるのです。 

 

And it becomes more and more intense through her mounting suspicion and her anguish, her discovery of her husband's betrayal.  

そして夫の浮気という裏切り行為について、彼女が疑い、怒り、そして目撃するという、積み重ねの中で、圧が高まってゆきます。 

 

And then, at her decision to avenge herself, which you will hear on a big crescendo in the orchestra, the piece increases more and more in intensity, and until we have Medea's dance of vengeance. After all, she was the sorceress, descended from the Sun God 

そして彼女は復讐を決意します。演奏では、オーケストラ全体が音量を盛り上げていって、だんだん圧が高まって、そしてメディアの復讐の踊りへとなだれ込みます。なにしろ彼女は、魔法使いであり、太陽神の子孫ですからね。 

 

JF 

Were those specific lines in the Euripides' drama that you had in mind when you wrote the work?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

この曲をお書きになっている時に、エウリピデスの原作の文章というのは、何か特別頭の中にあったのですか? 

 

SB 

Yes. They're spoken by Medea. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

ありました。それがメディアのセリフです。 

 

JF 

Will you read them?  

ジェームス・ファセット 

ちょっと読んでみてください。 

 

SB 

Yes.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

わかりました。 

 

Look, my soft eyes have suddenly filled with tears,  

Oh, children, how ready to cry I am,  

How full of foreboding, 

Jason wrongs me,  

Though I have never injured him,  

He has taken a wife to his house, supplanting me,  

Now I'm in the full force of a storm of hate, 

I will make dead bodies of three of my enemies, 

Father, the girl and my husband,  

Come, Medea!  

Whose father was noble,  

Whose grandfather God of the Sun,  

Go forward to the dreadful act.  

見て、穏やかだった私の瞳に、突然涙が溢れてきている 

子供達よ、母はもう、叫びたい 

不吉な気持ちが満ち溢れているの 

夫のジェイソンは、私に悪いことをした、 

私は一度も、彼を傷つけたことはないのに 

夫は女を連れ込んだ、私と取り替えるために 

もう憎しみの気持ちで一杯よ 

敵の3人、殺してここに転がしてやる 

我が父、あの小娘、そして我が夫 

さあ、行くわよ、自分、我が名はメディア! 

高貴なる父の娘 

太陽神の孫 

悲惨な目に、遭わせてやるわ 

 

JF 

It seems to me this work “Medea's Meditation and Dance of Vengeance” is vying with the “Adagio for Strings,” and in the number of performances all over the world it's receiving these days. Hasn't had been performed in Europe and in the Middle East? 

ジェームス・ファセット 

「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」は、例の「弦楽のためのアダージョ」と張り合っていますよね。全世界での上演回数でも、このところそれが分かります。ヨーロッパと、それから中東諸国でも上演されていますよね? 

 

SB 

Yes, it has. It's much more difficult than the “Adagio,” so that limited to almost a virtuoso orchestra. But there have been performances in Ankara, Tehran, Athens by the Minneapolis Symphony.  

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうですね。「アダージョ」と比べると、遥かに難しい技術が必要なので、何でもこなせるオーケストラ限定の曲ですね。ですがアンカラテヘランアテネで演奏してくださったのは、ミネアポリス交響楽団(現・ミネソタ管弦楽団)の皆さんですよ。 

 

JF 

Antal Dorati, yes. 

ジェームス・ファセット 

アンタル・ドラティさんの指揮ですね。 

 

SB 

Yes. In Israel, Mr. (Charles) Munch did it. Then in London, Oslo, Lima and then in the Near East (= Middle East). 

サミュエル・バーバー 

そうです。イスラエルとロンドン、リマ、それから他の中東諸国では、シャルル・ミュンシュさんが指揮を取ってくれました。 

 

JF 

The timing has worked out very well, Samuel Barber, because Mr. Mtropoulos is just about ready to walk on the stage of Carnegie Hall to perform “Medea's Meditation and Dance of Vengeance.” And thank you for coming down. 

ジェームス・ファセット 

サミュエル・バーバーさん、丁度話の切れ目で、今日の指揮者ドミトリー・ミトロプーロスさんが、カーネギーホールの舞台に上がろうとしています。演奏曲目は勿論、「メディアの瞑想と復讐の踊り」です。今日は放送席にお越しいただき、ありがとうございました。 

 

SB 

Thank you. 

サミュエル・バーバー 

こちらこそ。 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YY9wVv6dbnE 

初演時の音源です 

 

Medea's Meditation and Dance of Vengeance, Op. 23a (Live recorded 1956) ·  

New York Philharmonic  

Dimitri Mitropoulos 

 

 

英日対訳:ティファニー・プーン(香港・Pf)2018:「コツコツやるが大事」初見弾きの6つのコツ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emFOL3sookk 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Tiffany Poon 

2018/03/11 

 

 

Hi youtube! So today, I'm going to talk about the most requested video ever, which is “sight reading.”  

こんにちは!ユーチューブを御覧の皆さん!それじゃあ、本日は動画で一番リクエストを沢山頂いています、「初見力」について、お話します。 

 

For some reason, you guys think that I'm good at sight reading, but honestly I don't know if I'm even a good sight reader. 

何か理由があるのか、皆さんから、私が初見が得意だと、思っていただいているようですが、正直私的には、そういう素質があるかどうかも、ハッキリわからないのです。 

 

I actually don't think I'm good because I know that there are a lot of people who can do it so much better and are just geniuses of this.  

実際、自分に素質があるとは思っていません。というのも、私なんかよりももっとスゴイ方達が沢山いらっしゃいますし、このことについては、もう天才的としか言いようのない方達もおられます。 

 

But I'm very flattered that you guys think I'm good enough to make a video about it. So I will now talk to you about some, I guess, things that you should keep in mind if you want to improve sight reading. 

でもこのことで、動画を作らせていただけると、皆様が期待してくださるのは、すごく嬉しいので、これからいくつか、私の考えですが、初見力を伸ばしたい方のために、これだけは覚えておきましょう!をお話します。 

 

I don't know if I want to call these things “tips,” so that's why I have the quotations.   

こういうのは「コツ」と言っていいのかどうか、わからないので、「いわゆる」なんて言い方をしますね。 

 

I hope you guys enjoy this video. I hope you guys find it helpful, and please subscribe because that really really helps me.  

今日の動画、見てよかった」と思っていただければと思いますし、お役に立てれば幸いです。あとですね、是非、登録お願いします。そうしていただけると、私とても嬉しいです。 

 

And let's get to it.  

それじゃあ、始めましょうか。 

 

Augh! I've just got all these books from the library because I thought they are colorful and look good in the figure.  

よいしょっと!これ図書館から持ってきました。表紙の色が綺麗で、見栄えが良いのを選んできたんです。 

 

In order to get good at sight reading or get better, you have to just keep sight reading, and keep reading, keep reading and keep reading!  

初見力をつけるとか、初見力を伸ばすとか、そのためには、初見弾きをとにかくやり続けることです、ひたすら、ひたすらやり続けることです! 

 

Music is basically a language, so when you're sight reading you're kind of reading something in a foreign language.  

楽譜に書かれていることは、言葉や文字と基本的に同じです。ですから、初見弾きをするときは、知らない外国語で書かれている文章を読む、そんな感じです。 

 

And thinking back to how I learned English and that process, you just have to keep reading.  

私自身が国語(英語)の勉強をしたときのことを振り返ってみても、とにかくやり続けることです。 

 

I don't know if that's helpful, but you really just need to keep reading it and just push through.  

この方法がうまくいくかどうかは、わかりませんが、とにかく初見弾きをし続けて、それと、とにかく止まらず弾き続けることが必要です。 

 

When I was younger I would just go through books literally like this because I thought it was fun.  

まだ小さかった頃、読書をする時も、文字通り止まらず読んでいました。その方が楽しいと思ったからです。 

 

And I think it was great that my parents were not musicians and still aren't musicians because they wouldn't really care or mind.  

それから、両親が音楽家でなかった、今でもそうですけど、それが良かったと思っています。お陰で、私がすることに気をもんだり、癇に障ったりしませんでしたからね。 

 

I'm, yeah, I'm sure my dad knows that I messed up a lot because he is an audiophile! So I'm sure he has a good ear and he knows just “Don't care about what other people think. Just keep reading and keep playing and you will get better.” 

まあ、お父さんは、私がひどい演奏ばかりしていたことは、気づいていたと思います。だってお父さんはCDを聴くのが大好きなので!ですから耳は肥えていたと思います。その上で、「他の人達の言うことを気に病むなよ。とにかく譜面を読んで、ピアノを弾いて、そうすれば上手くなると思うよ。」言ってくれたのは、これだけです。 

 

I have way more books than these at home, but these are now gonna be my problems for the rest of this video. 

家に帰れば、これよりもっと沢山楽譜がありますが、今日の動画には関係ないので、このくらいにしておきますね。 

 

Second thing is, when you sight read, don't be afraid to make mistakes and just keep doing whatever you're doing. 

2つ目ですが、初見弾きをする時は、間違えたらどうしよう、と思いながらやらないこと。何の曲を弾くにせよ、止まらず弾き続けることです。 

 

When I sight read, I try to just keep going even if I made a mistake or bazillion because if your sight reading a piece ... I said this earlier in my Beethoven practice video; if you guys haven't watched the video you should check it out this side or this side ...  

私が初見弾きをするときは、とにかく止まらず弾き続けます。1箇所間違えようが、メチャクチャ間違えまくろうが、です。どうしてかというと、何かの曲を初見弾きする時は…これって、以前ベートーヴェンの曲の練習を動画で上げた時に言いましたっけ。もしその動画をご覧になっていない方、こちら、こちらかな?御覧くださいね… 

 

... when I sight read to learn a piece, I try to push through. If you push through, then you get a better sense of what the entire piece would sound like.  

ある曲を弾けるようになろう、ということで、初見弾きをする時は、私は止まらず弾き続けます。止まらず弾き続けることで、曲全体がどんな音がするのかを、やる前よりは掴むことが出来るからです。 

 

Even if it's not in a good shape yet, you still get a rough rough idea. Even if it's really rough, you still get an idea of some sort of a more general bigger picture.  

弾いた結果が、まともでない状態であったとしても、大体の感じはつかめるはずです。本当に大体でしかなかったとしても、何かしら、大まかな全体像がつかめるはずです。 

 

You also have something to look forward to. If you have a larger picture, you might enjoy the piece better, because then you know what's coming.  

それと、自分が知りたいと思うことも、知れることもあります。曲の全体像が少しでも大きくつかめれば、その曲をより楽しめるかもしれないじゃないですか。だって「こういう事ができるようになる」が分かるわけですからね。 

 

And that's kind of a motivation itself for you to keep working hard and practicing so that you get that finished product at the end.  

そしてそれ自体が、ある意味自分が一生懸命物事に取り組んで、練習し続けるモチベーションになるんです。一生懸命取り組んで、練習し続ければ、最後には完成品が手に入りますからね。 

 

And I know that sight-reading ... it's not always the prettiest to listen to or go through.  

それから、初見弾きですが…自分が初見弾きするのを、しっかり聴かないといけないのって、とっても楽しいとは限らいないし、初見弾きで、止まらず弾き続けることも、とっても楽しいとは限らないじゃないですか。 

 

I know that that tingling feeling in your brain. It's actually very much same feeling that I get when I read foreign languages. I don't know if anyone is like that.  

わかります、これって脳みそにチクチクされ続ける感じがしますよね。私だって、知らない外国語の文章を読んでいると、本当に同じように感じます。あ、他の人がどうかは、分かりませんけどね。 

 

But I know your brain is probably exhausted from trying to figure out all the notes, especially if you've never seen this piece before or you've never ever heard that composer.  

でも分かります、初見弾きで、書かれている音符を全部、何が書いてあるのか理解しようとし続けて、ヘトヘトになりますよね、多分。特に、名前も見たことのない曲とか、作曲家自体が知らない人だったら、尚更です。 

 

Still you just need to push it through and no matter what happens go to the finish line.  

それでも、とにかく止まらず弾き続けることが、何があっても弾き続けることが必要です。とにかく最後の小節まで行くんです。 

 

Another thing that is really important, so this is the third thing, is you need to listen to lots and lots of music.  

もう1つ、本当に大切なこと、これで3つ目ですね、沢山沢山演奏を聴いてください。 

 

Because over a time if you listen to lots of music and you sight read a lot and you just read through a lot of music, then eventually you start to pick up patterns 

というのも、時間を掛けてひたすら、沢山演奏を聴いて、初見弾きを沢山やって、最後まで楽譜を読むことを沢山の曲で行って、そうすると、パターンが掴め始めますから。 

 

You start to pick up patterns of certain composers or traditions that happen.  

その時その時で、取り組んでいる作曲家や、その流派の曲の傾向が、掴め始めるんです。 

 

So for example, you know that, if you're in the classical era the left hand is probably gonna have some sort of configuration.  

例えば、そうですね、古典派の音楽だったら、左手がやることって、多分こんな感じの形ですよね。 

 

If it's Mozart, it would be like .... things like that. 

モーツァルトだったら、こんな感じで…こんなのですよね。 

 

Or if you think of (Franz) Liszt, like this kind of ... this kind of scale? I don't know what to call it. 

それか、フランツ・リストだったら、こんな感じで…スケール?なんて言ったらいいか分かりませんけど。 

 

I think it's helpful for those who are starting out piano in the first couple of years, when you're just trying to know different kinds of pieces and going through the basic repertoire, you know, like Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Haydn, (Muzio) Clemente, Chopin, Liszt.  

これは私の考えですが、ピアノを始めて2,3年の方達にとっては、すごく役に立つと思うんです。この時期って、とにかく色んな種類の作品を知って、基本のレパートリーを体験して、例えば、モーツァルト、バッハ、ベートーヴェンハイドンクレメンティ、それにショパンとかですね。 

 

Once you have that data, once you know kind of what the patterns are, similarities between the pieces, eventually you'll be able to sight-read other pieces faster.  

一旦そういうデータが頭に入れば、ある意味パターンみたいなのが色々と頭に入れば、色々な曲の似たような点が頭に入れば、最終的には、他の曲の初見弾きも、出来るようになるんです。 

 

So I think that leads me to the fourth thing, which is, “Know your scales.”  

さあ、ここからこのまま、4つ目のお話です、それは「あなたが身につけるべき音階を、いくつも弾けるようになりましょう」です。 

 

And I know I said in the other video that I don't practice scales, which is still true.  

わかってます、以前ほかの動画で言いましたよね、私は音階を全部、反復練習みたいにやることはしない、これは今でもそうです。 

 

But I mean, if you're learning piano for the first few years, you have to know the basics. So you have to know all your scales you have to know; just basic patterns that will help you figure out pieces quicker. 

ただ、さきほど言いましたのは、ピアノを始めて最初の2,3年は、とにかく基本形を色々と身に着けないといけない、ということなんです。ですから、あなたが身につけるべき音階を、全部残らず弾けるようになりましょう、というわけです。基本形だけでいいんです。それが、色々な曲を少しでも時間を掛けずに理解できるようになる、その助けになるからです。 

 

So if you look at a piece, you'll be like “Oh, that's a C major scale, going to a G major or D major.” So you don't have to fret over “Oh, no! What notes gonna come next?”  

そうすると、例えばある曲の譜面を見れば「あ、ハ長調の音階か、そうしたら次はト長調とかニ長調とかが出てくるかな」て分かりますよね。「もう嫌!あーもう、次は何だよ!」なんて、イラッとしないで済みますよね。 

 

I think that speeds up the process for classical music. 

古典派の音楽なんかだと、それでだいぶ時間を稼ぐことが出来ると思います。 

 

I can't say anything about contemporary or funkier pieces because even Ravel, for example, he's not exactly too contemporary, but he is in the more modern side.  

このことは、現代音楽とか、ジャズやポップス系の音楽については、なんとも言えません。というのも、例えばあのラベルでさえ、極端に先の読めないような曲を作る人では無いわけですが、それでもどちらかと言えば、そっち方面ですから。 

 

If you guys followed my Instagram, you know that I was talking about how his trio was quite hard for me to read through. Even though I was trying to push through I had to stop in the middle just take like a five minute break and then keep going again.  

私のインスタグラムをフォローしてくださっている方達はご存知かと思いますが、ラベルのピアノ三重奏曲は、本当に譜読みが大変でした。最後まで行こうと思っても、途中でストップせざるを得なくなって、5分休憩して、また読み続ける、みたいな感じでした。 

 

The fifth thing, that kind of ties in with why I said just now, about knowing the basics is knowing a little bit of music theory.  

今なぜこんな事を言ったのか、そのことと、次の5つ目がつながるのですが、基本形を色々と身に着けないといけない、ということは、多少なりとも楽典を身に着けないといけない、ということになります。 

 

When I was sight reading and really just getting into piano the first couple of years, I actually did not have that much music theory background.  

私が昔初見弾きをしていた頃、ピアノを始めて最初の2,3年間は、実は楽典のことは、あまり良くわかっていませんでした。 

 

I didn't really learn music theory very properly until I came to Juilliard for pre college  

しっかり確実な形で楽典を学んだとは、ジュリアード音楽院に通うようになってからです。 

 

So, music theory might not be the most essential thing, but I think it definitely helped knowing progressions of chords, knowing that ... for example that if you're in C major and if you're gonna encounter the fifth and ...  

楽典は、必要不可欠な知識の中でも、最優先というわけでは、ないかもしれません。ですが絶対に役に立ったと思っています。例えば、コード進行なんかで…例えばハ長調で、5度が出てきたら… 

 

And if you are going to a cadence, the most basic would be five and one ... 

それからカデンスがでてきたら、一番基本的なのは5度と1…。 

 

... so things like that you kind of guess where the composers are going next.  

…みたいな感じで、ある意味作曲家が、次に何の音のしようか、という予想が立ちます。 

 

It's not like when I play, “Oh, oh, five, six, four? This is a four six?” things like that.  

ですからピアノを弾く時に「あら、5度?6度?4度?これは4度と6度?」なんてことには、ならないわけです。 

 

But I think music theory also helps you find patterns, which helps you to recognize things much faster in your sight reading. So it's all about finding patterns.  

あとは、楽典を身に着けていれば、パターンを見つけるのに役に立つと思うんです。そうすれば、初見弾きで色々なことを確認するのに、ウンと速くやれるようになる、結局全て、パターンみたいなのが見えてくる、てことになりますね。 

 

And I have to say the last thing is actually maybe, the most important thing is that “Make sure you reward yourself.”  

さて、一番最後に一番大切な事を、言わないといけません。それは「必ず自分にご褒美をしましょう。」です。 

 

It does take up a lot of energy. I've been there, I know the struggles. So I understand why you guys keep asking me to do a video on sight reading. 

初見弾きは気力体力を沢山使います。私も経験がありますから、どんだけ大変か、知っています。ですから、動画で初見弾きのことを採り上げて欲しい、というリクエストをずっと頂いているのも、分かります。 

 

Maybe reward yourself after a certain amount of sight reading. 

ある程度初見弾きは、量をこなしたら、自分にご褒美をなさってはいかがでしょう。 

 

If you just read through a page or maybe even half a page, if it's a really hard piece or if you want to do it at the end, but just make sure that you kind of pat yourself in the back.  1ページでも、そのまた半分でもいいですから、本当に大変な曲でも、あるいは最後までやり遂げたいと思っでも、とにかく自分にご褒美をすることを、必ずしてくださいね。 

 

Make the experience as enjoyable as possible, whether that's giving yourself a cookie, piece of chocolate, having a huge meal at the end.  

初見弾きという経験を、できるだけ楽しいものにしましょう。クッキー1枚でもいい、チョコレート1カケラでもいい、全部終わったら沢山ごちそうを用意してもいい、とにかく楽しくやりましょう。 

 

If you had a really hard session, just sight reading a bunch of hard pieces, which I've done that before, just make sure that you give yourself some credit because sight reading is hard especially if you're starting out.  

本当に大変な練習になったら、難しい曲をいくつも初見弾きするなら、私も以前やったことありますけれど、そんな時は必ず、自分を認めてあげてください。それほど、特にピアノを始めて間もない頃は、初見弾きというのは大変なものだからです。 

 

And I hope these tips kind of helped you. I really do because I don't want to disappoint you guys. You guys have been asking me for a sight reading video for so long.  

こういう「コツ」がお役に立てれば嬉しいです。本当にそう思います。皆さんのご期待に、私も応えたいからです。ずっと初見弾きについては、リクエストを頂いていましたからね。 

 

And make sure you like this video if you thought it was helpful. 

この動画、お役に立てれば、是非気に入って見てください。 

 

If you guys are interested and want to hear me sight-read, leave a comment below and put down a piece of music that you want to see me sight-read.  

初見弾きについては、ご興味があって、もっとご覧になりたい方は、ここにコメントを、それと、私に初見弾きをしてほしい曲があれば、ここにお願いします。 

 

If there's a piece that maybe you have to sight-read, before you had trouble with or you just want to see how I would sight read, just leave the name of the piece down below in the comments.  

ご自身で初見弾きをしなければならない曲がおありでしたら、お困りになる前に、あるいは私がどのように初見弾きをするか、ご覧になりたい方は、ぜひ曲名をコメント欄にお願いします。 

 

And maybe I'll film a video sight reading your choices if there's enough interest. So make sure you like this video, put a comments down below and subscribe and I'll see you guys in the next few days. 

そうしたら、皆さんからのリクエストが集まりましたら、動画をまた作ろうと思います。ですので、今日の動画を気に入っていただけましたら、コメントと、あと登録を是非よろしくおねがいします。また2,3日したら、お会いしましょう。 

 

Bye! 

またね! 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3GVzOR0DO0 

15歳の時の素晴らしい演奏です♪ 

 

Piano Concerto No.1 in E Minor Op.11  (Fredrick Chopin) 

Tiffany Poon 

Moscow Chamber Orchestra  

cond. Vladimir Ryzhaev. 

September 20, 2012

英日対訳:シンシア・イェ(台湾・シカゴ響主席Prc.)2021「表現力」に本当に必要なもの

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1AdMZrsD6U 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

2021/12/16 

Orchestral Excerpt Insights  

CSO Principal Percussion Cynthia Yeh  

on Leonard Bernstein’s epic score from West Side Story.  

名曲の名場面を深堀り 

シカゴ交響楽団主席打楽器奏者 シンシア・イェ 

レナード・バーンスタイン作曲ウェスト・サイド・ストーリーより 

 

Hi, I'm Cynthia Yeh, principal percussionist of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. 

こんにちは、シカゴ交響楽団主席打楽器奏者の、シンシア・イェと申します。 

 

(Leonard BernsteinWest Side Story” Meeting Scene / Cool) 

レナード・バーンスタイン作曲「ウェスト・サイド・ストーリー」より 出会い/クール) 

 

I picked Leonard Bernstein's “West Side Story” on vibes, because it's actually quite a complex instrument that I find to be neglected by a lot of young players. 

今回ヴィブラフォンのパートをご覧に入れます、レナード・バーンスタイン作曲の「ウェスト・サイド・ストーリー」ですが、楽器の操作が複雑で、結構多くの若手打楽器奏者達が、ちゃんと気を遣って弾いていないな、と思って、採り上げてみました。 

 

Yes, the vibes is a mallet instrument, but there are so many options for colors, inflections, and nuances. 

そうです、ヴィブラフォンというのは、マレットで叩けば良い楽器ですが、実は様々な音色や抑揚、それにニュアンスをつけるのに、操作方法が沢山あるので、キチンと選ばないといけないんです。 

 

And mainly, it comes from not just your hands playing the notes, but also your feet doing the peddling, the subtleties of that, and also mallet dampening with your other hand that's not playing the note. 

そして、音符を弾くのは両手ですけれど、音色や抑揚、ニュアンスの変化は、それだけじゃないんです。足も使います。足踏みペダルを操作して、微妙な変化を付けていくのです。もう1つ、音符を弾いていない手に持っているマレットで、音を減衰させたりもするのです。 

 

West Side Story” is the modern-day Romeo and Juliet. It is a tragic love story. 

ウェスト・サイド・ストーリー」といえば、現代版のロメオとジュリエットですよね。恋愛ものですが、とても悲しい結末のお話です。 

 

The first excerpt I played, it's called “The Meeting Scene,” the very first bit of this excerpt is to take the audience into the space. 

最初に取り出して弾いてみますのは、「出会いの場面」です。今から弾く部分の、一番最初の部分で、聴衆を物語の世界へ引き込むのです。 

 

(vibraphone playing) 

 

Now we're just the two of them. You take a breath and it's... 

それじゃあ、この2つだけ取り出してみましょう。弾く前に息を吸って… 

 

(”Maria” : vibraphone playing) 

 

That's her theme. That's what he's been singing about. 

「マリア」と歌いましたが、登場人物の主題です。彼女の恋人、トニーがずっと歌っているものですね。 

 

And then, you can hear that ... it's very, kind of passionate. And then, the major chords of the (singing) vibraphone plays is young, innocent, but still hopeful. 

さあ、ここでお聞きになれましたか…とても、ある意味情熱的なフレーズです。ここでヴィブラフォンが弾く長調の和音、これは、若さとか、無垢な様子だとか、それでもまだ、望みを持っている、そんな感じですよね。 

 

But then the very next thing that comes in is ... 

ところが、そう思った直後に、これです… 

 

(singing and vibraphone plays) 

 

It's this minor... You know, even they know that this is probably not going to work out. 

これは短調の和音ですね…2人は、自分達の恋が、多分うまく行かない、そんな運命なんだということを、知っている、というわけです。 

 

So the second and third lick are both from "Cool". And that's the scene right before the "Rumble". 

それじゃあ、次に2つ目と3つ目を両方取り出して、弾いてみます。「クール」ですね。ここは「決闘」の場面の、すぐ前になります。 

 

So the guys are meeting there in a group, and they're telling each other to keep it cool. So to me, that is a lot of anticipation of amped-up energy, but you're trying to contain it. 

2つのグループが相対して、それぞれグループの中で、お互いに、冷静になるよう声を掛け合っている、そんな場面です。これは私の意見ですが、エネルギーが物凄くなってきて、それが目に見えてきて、でもそれを、自分達の中に押し込めようとしている、そんな風に感じます。 

 

It's before the drummer starts. It's just you, and the little accent pops are literally in the voice parts. They're fake hitting each other. 

ドラム奏者が演奏を始める前の部分、ヴィブラフォンだけになります。少しアクセントを付けて、「ポンッ」という感じの音、これは歌手がいるときには、歌の中にも出てきます。お互いに、殴り合うような素振りをするのです。 

 

So this is where the pows are coming. So, you know,  there's just that energy, you kind of have to create in that second lick. 

乱闘が始まろうとしている、そういうところです。先程いいましたエネルギーが、ひたすら溢れてきます。ある意味これを、2つ目のフレーズで作っていかないといけません。 

 

And then the third lick, by the time that comes in, you've got the drummer going on a high-hat and it's very intense. 

次に3つ目ですが、ここにくるまでに、ドラム奏者がハイハットを弾き始めています。圧が凄くなってきています。 

 

And this is not about perfectly placed dotted eighth notes (and) sixteenths, now it's very much swung and it just needs to be fat on the backside of the beat so that you're still ringing in the energy and not really letting it go, even though it's going.  

楽譜通りに付点8分音符と16分音符を叩く、そういうことではないんですね。そうではなくて、ここではしっかりとスウィング、裏拍を太らせる感じ、そうすることで、エネルギーを帯びて音を鳴らしていく、でもまだそれを、爆発させない、勿論、いずれそうなるわけなんですけど、まだ爆発させない、という感じです。 

 

Mistake number one that I see the most with a lot of young percussionists is that the pedal is either on or off, but there are ... it's on a spring, it's spring loaded for a reason. 

ここで、若手打楽器奏者達によく見受けられる、間違えの1つ目、足踏みを、踏むか離すか、2つに1つしかやらないことです。でも本当は…バネが付いていますよね、これには目的があるんです。 

 

There are so many different nuances. The damper pedal right here, that's connected to your foot pedal, does not need to always be all the way off or all the way on. 

この楽器が出せるニュアンスは、とても沢山、様々にあります。音をまっすぐ伸ばしたままにするペダルが、ここにあって、これが足踏みペダルにつながっています。このペダルは、踏みっぱなしかそうでないか、いつも2つに1つどちらかじゃない、てことです。 

 

And you'll notice that I flutter pedal a lot on my foot ... 

私がペダルを踏む足を、バタバタと落ち着きなく動かしているのが、おわかりいただけると思います… 

 

(vibraphone playing) 

 

... just because I want to get some of it out, but not all of it. So I create something that is quite connected. 

こうすることで、音をまっすぐ伸ばしたり、でもそうでないのもあったりと、そうすることで、音が一つ一つ、切られながらもしっかりつながっている、そんな感じを作っているのです。 

 

And then of course the mallet dampening also allows you to have very selective notes ring while others don't ring. 

それと勿論、マレットを使って音を止める方法もあります。これで、ある音は伸ばして、他の音は伸ばさない、なんて選ぶことができるのです。 

 

And then you'll notice sometimes I really pick up my foot. It kind of reminds me of like a saxophone player that like bites the end of their note and it just has a really short bite to it. 

時々私が、文字通り足を上げているのに、お気づきになるかと思います。丁度サックス奏者が、音の終わりをギュッと止めて、「パクッ」と音を実際に噛み付くような、そんな感じですね。 

 

So it's not about the peddling. It's not about all these things, but it is the peddling that creates all these moods.  

ですから、これはペダルの使いこなしがどうこう、というわけではありません。ここまでご紹介したもの以外にも、まだまだありますが、こういった曲の雰囲気を創るのが、ペダルの使いこなしなのです。 

 

And, you know ... I know that for young students, the very beginning, they're worried about articulation, but this is not about articulation. 

それとですね…若い子達、音大生とか、始めたばかりの頃は、アーティキュレーションが気になって仕方がないものです。でも本当に気にすべきなのは、アーティキュレーションそのものではないんです。 

 

This is not about evenness. This is not about any of that. It is about setting the scene and it's not something where someone told me, this is exactly how you get the sound. 

音の長さを均等にとか、そういうことじゃないんです。大事なのは、場面を描くことなんです。誰かが私にそういったとか、そればかりじゃなくて、自分でその音をしっかりと掴むには、場面を描く、まさにこれなんです。 

 

You move your hand this way and you move your foot this way. It's actually, well, I want this to be this scene. 

こうやって手を動かすだの、こうやって足を動かすだのして、実際に、そうですね、自分が描いたこの場面になるように、持ってゆきたい、ということなんです。 

 

So how do I blur notes, how do I get less articulation, how do I create tension, how do I create bite. 

どうやって一つ一つの音にぼかしを掛けてみようか、どうやって曖昧な感じを出してみようか、どうやって緊張感を作ってみようか、どうやって音を「パクッ」と止めるような感じを効かせようか、それを自分で考えるのです。 

 

And if we don't spend some time on the vibes on a very regular basis, it's not a technique that just comes. 

そんなわけですから、毎日でも毎週でも毎月でも、時間を取ってヴィブラフォンに触って練習する、これをしないと、技術がうまい具合に発揮されてこないのです。 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOjHhS5MtvA 

 

彼女がシンバルを担当する演奏です♪ 

 

交響曲第9番(ルードヴィヒ・ヴァン・ベートーヴェン 

シカゴ交響楽団・同合唱団 

指揮:リッカルド・ムーティ 

May 7, 2015 

英日対訳:パーシー・グレインジャー(豪・作曲)1939WNYC母の教え/グリーグ/「歩く」魅力

https://www.wnyc.org/story/interview-with-percy-grainger/ 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Percy Grainger Interview - Herman Neuman  

April 25th, 1939 / WNYC “Hands Across the Sea” 

WNYC海外音楽番組「Hands Across the Sea」 

1939年4月25日放送分 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

ホスト:ハーマン・ニューマン 

 

Herman Neuman 

“Hands Across the Sea” is privileged to have as its special guest this afternoon, Percy Grainger, the eminent Australian-American pianist and composer. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

「Hands Across the Sea」本日午後のひととき、素晴らしい特別ゲストをお迎えすることが出来ました。名ピアニストで作曲家、オーストラリア出身で、現在はアメリカ国籍を取られています、パーシー・グレインジャーさんです。 

 

Australia has given many notable artists and made many notable contributions to American musical life. And Percy Grainger is one of the outstanding contributions that we have inherited from Australia.  

これまで数多くの優秀なオーストラリア出身の音楽家がいて、アメリカの音楽界にも多くの貢献をしている国です。その中でもパーシー・グレインジャーさんは、際立った存在で、我が国がオーストラリアから受け継いだ、素晴らしい音楽家です。 

 

It's a very great pleasure, Mr. Grainger to have you on this program “Hands Across the Sea” on Anzac Day. 

ようこそ「Hands Across the Sea」へご出演くださいました。しかも今日は「アンザックデー」でもあります。 

 

Percy Grainger 

Such a great pleasure to be with you. I always enjoy hearing your conduct and being associated with you musically. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

こちらこそ、今日は嬉しいです。あなたの番組はいつも拝聴していますし、こうして音楽の話でご縁が出来て、良かったです。 

 

HN 

Well, thank you very much. I consider that a very lovely compliment, Mr. Grainger, but I just want to turn back the pages of time, back to your early days. You were born in Melbourne. Is that not so?  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

こちらこそ、有難うございます。嬉しいことを仰ってくださいましたね、グレインジャーさん。でも早速ですが、時をさかのぼって、あなたがまだ小さかった頃のお話を伺いたいと思います。お生まれはメルボルンでしたね、違いましたっけ? 

 

PG 

Yes, in 1882, yes.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

メルボルンです。1882年ですね。 

 

HN 

I know that your mother exerted a very profound influence on your decisions in your musical life. Could you tell us something about that? 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

楽家としての道を選ぶにあたっては、お母様の影響が大変大きいとのことですが、その辺りをお聞かせください。 

 

PG 

Yes. Well, my mother had this rather unusual attitude, perhaps that for someone who came from a family that did not practice music. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうですね、この件については、母は独特な考え方でしたね。音楽を「訓練という行為を経験させるためのもの」として取り組まない、そう考える家庭が、家族に与えるもの、そう思っていたのかもしれません。 

 

She cared for music as an emotional experience and not as a matter of technique or skill, or anything to do with entertainment. She regarded it like she regarded poetry as something part of her life of feeling. 

母は音楽を、人の心の揺れ動きを経験させるためのもの、そんな風に扱っていましたね。テクニックやスキルを身につけることや、自分や他人をもてなし楽しませることが本質というわけではない。詩、みたいなもので、自分の心の奥底にある思いが、年令を重ねてゆく、その「思い」の一部を構成するものと捉えていました。 

 

HN 

Well, didn't that lead to your decision that the composition was to be ... perhaps one of your 40s in your musical creativeness? 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

なるほど、そのことがあって、作曲活動を…40代のころでしたか、音楽の創作活動として取り組もうとお決めになった、ということでしょうか。 

 

PG 

Yes. People say, of course, that music is a form of self-expression, but I don't see how that can be when you're playing somebody else's composition.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです。音楽は自己表現の方法だ、という人達は、当然います。でも私は、他人様の作品を演奏しているときには、そう思えないんですよ。 

 

HN 

I see. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そうですか。 

 

PG 

If so, what happens to his self-expression!?  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

だとしたら、自分の作品を演奏する時はどうなるんだ?て話です。 

 

HN 

Well, you see, of course, today we have such wonderful things in recording that your magnificent piano playing, of course, would go down for to prosperity.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

勿論今では、あなたの素晴らしいピアノ演奏の音源が、当然これらは大成功を収めているわけですが、手に入るわけですからね。 

 

But still it's nothing like leaving one of your own creations behind, like your many compositions.  

といってもこれは、あなた自身が手掛けた作品の数々を、脇に避けてしまう、ということでは無いようですね。 

 

PG 

Yes, because the composition, of course, is a national expression, isn't it?  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

それはそうです。だって作曲家が譜面に書くことは、当然、自分の生まれ育った地域社会や文化が、そこに現れてきますでしょう? 

 

HN 

That's right. But I'm very happy, Mr. Grainger, that you didn't neglect your pianist career because you've had a most outstanding success in that.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そのとおりです。まあでもね、グレインジャーさん、ホッとしましたよ。あなたがピアノ奏者としてのキャリアに目もくれていないんじゃないかと思ったものですから。こんなに大成功を収めているのにね。 

 

You know, I was very much interested in reading about you, then your relationships with Edvard Grieg. You're a great friend of Edvard Grieg. 

あなたについて書かれた物を読んで、大変興味を持ったのが、エドヴァルド・グリーグとの関係です。大親友だそうですね。 

 

PG 

Yes. My mother had been so fond of playing Grieg's music when I was a little boy. So I was very familiar with it. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです。私が小さい頃、母がグリーグの曲を弾くのが大好きだったので、私にとっても大変親しみのある音楽です。 

 

HN 

Didn't you introduce his piano concerto for the first time? 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

グリーグのピアノ協奏曲の初演は、あなたがなさったんでしたっけ? 

 

PG 

No, no. I didn't do that. You see, he wrote the piano concerto when he was 24, and he was 64 when I met him. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

とんでもない。違いますよ。彼がその曲を書いたのは、24歳の時です。私が彼と出会った時には、彼は64歳でしたからね。 

 

HN 

Oh, I see. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

なるほど、そうですね。 

 

PG 

So it had ... How long is that? It had been played for 40 years. Now the only thing that was new about it was my playing it.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

ですから…何年だ?作曲から40年間、他の人達によって演奏され続けています。私がこの曲を弾いたということは、単に最近のこの曲に対して起きた出来事の1つでしかない、てことです。 

 

HN 

I see. Well, it has certainly been associated with you a great many times your interpretation of it. It has always been ... 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

わかりました。グリーグのピアノ協奏曲については、あなたが演奏したことが、とかく言われていることです。これまでに… 

 

PG 

Yes, because he chose me to play it at the Leeds Festival (in 1907).  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです、(1907年の)リーズ音楽祭で、彼からピアノ独奏をするよう、選んでもらいましたからね。 

 

HN 

Yes. And that was unfortunate he was going... he was going to conduct ... 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そうなんですよね。そして彼が指揮をする予定だったのに… 

 

PG 

Yes, he was going to conduct two programs there.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです、2回の公演で、指揮をする予定でした。 

 

HN 

And he died just about a month before then, didn't he? 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

本番のわずか1ヶ月前に、亡くなってしまったんですよね? 

 

PG 

Yes, just about... he died about the 10th of August.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです、丁度…8月10日頃でしたか。 

 

HN 

But you played it anyway with ... 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

とにかくあなたは、演奏することにはなりました。 

 

PG 

Yes.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです。 

 

HN 

And I know with outstanding success. Did Grieg have any influence on your decisions? You've done great deal with folk music in your compositions. Did Grieg have any influence on you in that respect?  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そして演奏は大成功だったと伺っています。これまで音楽活動をなさっていて、色々な決断をなさってきたことと思いますが、グリーグの影響というのはありましたか?ご自身の曲には民謡を多く取り入れていますよね。この点は何か影響があったんですか? 

 

PG 

Not personally, but his music did. I've done many folk song settings before I met Grieg. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

彼と接したことで受けた影響はありません。作品には影響を受けましたよ。民謡はグリーグと出会う前から、沢山取り組んできましたから。 

 

HN 

Yes.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そうでしたね。 

 

PG 

In fact, most of my best known ones were written before I met him. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

実際、皆さんに知っていただいている私の曲の、主だったところは、グリーグと出会う前のものが大半です。 

 

HN 

That's right. That includes “Molly on the Shore,” and “Shepherd's Hey,” and “Irish Tune from the County Derry.” 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そうでしたね。その中には「岸辺のモーリー」、「羊飼いのヘイ」、それに「デリー地方のアイルランド民謡」などがあります。 

 

PG 

Yeah.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

おっしゃるとおりです。 

 

HN 

Some of those numbers like “Country Gardens” that have 

become almost...  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

その中には、「カントリー・ガーデンズ」のように、今では… 

 

PG 

“Country Gardens” was later. There was no...  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

「カントリー・ガーデンズ」はもっと後の作品ですよ。これは… 

 

HN 

... standard works in everybody's repertoire. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

いやいや、ピアノを弾く人なら誰もがレパートリーにしている曲も、いくつかあります、てことです。 

 

“Music is always full of the water of vida in Mr. Grainger. But he's a great outdoor man. And I've read a great deal about him, and I know quite a good bit about him in his feeling for the great outdoors. I know he's a great walker.” 

「グレインジャー氏の音楽には、不滅の命の水が、いつも満ち溢れている。だが彼は、アウトドア活動でも、大した人物だ。彼についてはこれまで沢山文献を読んできた。そして彼の心に抱く思いには、アウトドアを大いに楽しむものがあることを、私はとても良く知っている。彼は健脚の持ち主でもある。」 

 

Is that not so, Mr. Grainger? 

これって、このとおりですか、グレインジャーさん? 

 

PG 

Well, I like walking because I like to see the things that you can see when you walk.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうですね、歩くのは好きですよ。歩いていると、物事がよく見えるじゃないですか。 

 

HN 

That's right. We rush by in automobiles, and we miss all the intimate beauties of nature.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

まったくです。エンジン付きの乗り物に乗ったら、間近で感じ取れる自然の美しさは、全部感じ取れませんからね。 

 

PG 

Yes, it's true.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

本当にそのとおりなんですよ。 

 

HN 

I hear you once walked 65 miles and to give a concert in Durban, South Africa. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

伺うところでは、南アフリカのダーバンでコンサートをおやりになった時に、80キロ近く歩いていったそうじゃないですか。 

 

PG 

Yeah. So I ... Well, I walked from Pietermaritzburg because I wanted to see the Zulus and the Zulu country ....  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです、ええとですね…ピーターマリッツバーグから歩いたんですよ。ズールー族と、ズールー族が暮らしている場所を見たかったんです。 

 

HN 

I see.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

そういうことなんですね。 

 

PG 

... which are both very interesting.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

どちらも、とても興味深かったですよ。 

 

HN 

And you also walked across the Australian desertss?  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

それと、オーストラリアの砂漠も、あちこち歩いて通ったんですよね。 

 

PG 

The South Australian deserts, yes. Very beautiful part of the world. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

オーストラリアの南部の方にある砂漠をいくつか、そうですね。世界中を探しても、とても美しい場所ですよ。 

 

HN 

I recall just a few weeks ago hearing you play the Tchaikovsky's piano concerto with The West Point Military Academy Band. That was quite a thrill and how ... 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

ところでふと思い出したのですが、半月ほど前でしたか、あなたがチャイコフスキーのピアノ協奏曲を、陸軍士官学校のバンドと共演されました。あれは本当に心が震える演奏でしたよ。なにせ… 

 

PG 

Yes, it's a lovely band, isn't it?  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

あのバンドは、素晴らしいですよね? 

 

HN 

Yes, it certainly is.  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

まったくです。 

 

PG 

It has such a wonderful conductor ... 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

指揮者も素晴らしい方が居て… 

 

HN 

What are we going to hear of yours this afternoon? 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

ところで今日は、何をかけましょうかね? 

 

PG 

Oh, this “Marching Song of Democracy.” And that I feel is the most typically Australian piece I've written.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

ああ、この「Marching Song of Democracy」(自由と平等の行進歌)ですね。私の書いた中では、いかにもオーストラリア的なものだと、そう思っています。 

 

HN 

That's all and who performs it?  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

編成はどうなっていますか? 

 

PG 

That's for chorus, orchestra and organ. 

パーシー・グレインジャー 

合唱と管弦楽、それにオルガンです。 

 

HN 

Recorded at the BBC?  

ハーマン・ニューマン 

録音は、イギリスのBBCで行われたものですね? 

 

PG 

That's the BBC, yes, conducted by (Hubert) Leslie Woodgate.  

パーシー・グレインジャー 

そうです。BBCで、指揮はヒューバート・レスリーウッドゲートさんが引き受けてくださいました。 

 

HN 

Well, thank you very much Percy Grainger, and let's listen to the “Marching Song of Democracy,” the composition of Percy Grainger. 

ハーマン・ニューマン 

パーシー・グレインジャーさん、本日は誠にありがとうございました。それではお聴きいただきましょう、パーシー・グレインジャー作曲の「Marching Song of Democracy」(自由と平等の行進歌)です。 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44eizaByCS4 

 

彼の故郷の楽士達による力演です♪ 

 

演奏:メルボルン交響楽団・同合唱団 

指揮:サー・アンドリュー・デイヴィス 

Released on: 2013-04-02 

 

https://archive.org/details/marchingsongofde00grai/page/n55/mode/2up 

合唱・ピアノ譜 

 

英日対訳:小澤征爾(日・指揮)1999"Charlie Rose"ボストン響と25年/長野五輪/人生最後の曲

https://charlierose.com/videos/10065 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Tuesday 04/20/1999 

1999年4月20日 

 

Charlie Rose  

Dr. SEIJI OZAWA is here. He is the first Japanese Orchestra conductor to achieve prominence in the Western world and is widely credited with helping to bridge the gap between Eastern and Western musicians.  

チャーリー・ローズ 

指揮者の小澤征爾さんにお越しいただいています。欧米を舞台に本格的な成功を収めた、初めての日本人指揮者で、「洋の東西」の音楽家達の架け橋として、大きな一助となったことで、幅広く評価を得ています。 

 

His conducting career began in Tokyo and led him to orchestras in San Francisco and Toronto. Last year, he celebrated his 25th anniversary as music direct of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Here he is conducting that orchestra as they perform in Boston.  

指揮者としてのキャリアは、東京から始まりました。その後、サンフランシスコやトロントのオーケストラで指揮者を務め、昨年、ボストン交響楽団音楽監督就任から25周年を迎えたところです。こちらの映像は、ボストン交響楽団の本拠地での演奏、指揮は小澤征爾さんです。 

 

( “March to the scaffold” by Hector Berlioz)  

ベルリオーズ作曲「幻想交響曲」第4楽章「断頭台への行進」より) 

 

Let me talk about you as a conductor. There a John Williams and other people say the following things about you in terms of qualities as a conductor.  

指揮者としてのあなたの力については、ジョン・ウィリアムズや、他の方達から色々と伺っています。 

 

“ ...is the energy you bring to the podium and an almost ballet-like grace that is, it's an aid in communicating what you want the orchestra to do.”  

「とにかく、指揮台からもたらされるエネルギーが凄い。そしてクラシック・バレエのような優雅さ、これが相まって助けとなって、オーケストラと意思の疎通が、思いのままに出来ている」 

 

Do you agree with that? 

いかがですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I don't know. If you ask my wife, I am really no dancer. I cannot dance, you know? She likes to dance. 

小澤征爾 

どうですかね。妻はダンスが好きなので、訊いていただければわかりますが、そんなにダンサーてほど、大したもんじゃないですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

You became a conductor because you hurt your hands in rugby? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

指揮者になろうと思ったのは、ラグビーをやって手を怪我してしまったからだとか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, these two fingers. 

小澤征爾 

そうなんです、この2本です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ですってね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I was, you know, I wanted to be pianist. 

小澤征爾 

元々、ピアノ弾きになりたかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

To become pianist. But I also had a passion, rugby football. You know, the English rugby. 

小澤征爾 

ピアノ弾きにね。でもラグビーも大好きで、ラグビー、てイギリスのフットボールね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、わかります。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And one game really did it to me. I was number eight. I don't know you know rugby. Number eight is, you know, dangerous spot because have to make a decision very quick. 

小澤征爾 

それで、ある日試合に出た時、ナンバーエイトのポジションだったんですよ。ラグビーのことご存知ですか?ナンバーエイト、ていうのは瞬時の判断ができないと、怪我をするので危ないポジションなんですね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, sometimes they really come to me purposely beginning of a game. And I think that game they tried to do it, and they got me. And knock somewhere. 

小澤征爾 

相手チームは試合中は、意図的に突っ込んできますから、その日の試合も僕にどんどん突っ込んてきて、試合の途中でとうとう僕は倒されてしまったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Before I touch ball. 

小澤征爾 

それも、僕がボールに触れる前にですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, that's supposed not happen, you know? But happened. And then I went down and the people went with the...with the shoes. You know, hard shoes? 

小澤征爾 

これは反則なんですよ、でもやられてしまって、僕は倒れて、突っ込んできた相手の選手達は、シューズですから、わかります?硬いシューズですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, sure, over defences. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、わかります。防ぎきれませんよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And then I cut in-- my nose and mouth become one, inside, you know? And then two fingers were broken. And that ... 

小澤征爾 

それで、鼻と口を切ってしまって、裂け目がつながってしまうくらいにね。それから指を2本骨折して… 

 

Charlie Rose  

That ended your career. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

選手生命を絶たれましたな。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

On the piano. 

小澤征爾 

ピアノ奏者としてのね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Your hopes of being a great pianist. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ピアノ奏者として有名になりたかった夢でしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Because a half year I couldn't play. 

小澤征爾 

だって半年間ピアノが弾けなくなってしまいましたからね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Still, I'mOK 

小澤征爾 

今は大丈夫ですけどね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Well, are you happy? Are you glad, now, that that happened because it turned you to conducting? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょう。で、今となっては良かったというところですか?それで指揮者に転向するキッカケになったということですが。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But that time was a tragedy to me. 

小澤征爾 

その時は災難でしたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

For me. 

小澤征爾 

僕にとってはね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

A tragedy? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

災難、ですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

そりゃそうですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

'Cause you dreamed of being a ...  

チャーリー・ローズ 

だってなりたかったのは… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, very fascinated, too. And then this really wonderful suggestion that my piano teacher said. She says, ''Since there are no many Japanese conductor, why don't you try to become conductor?''  

小澤征爾 

ええ、指揮者にもすごく興味はありました。で、僕のピアノ先生が、スゴイ提案をしてくれたんですよ。「今、日本人で指揮者をしている人は、あまり多くないから、指揮者をやってみたらイイんじゃないかしら。」 

 

And so ... and then also I wanted to go composition, and conducting, and my teacher, Saito, Hideo Saito, was my mother's side relative. So, my mother introduce me to Saito. Was great teacher. 

それと、当時は作曲もやってみたかったので、あと指揮者、それと齋藤秀雄先生といって、僕の先生で、母方の親戚でもあった方がいてですね、母が齋藤先生に僕を紹介してくれたんです。本当に素晴らしい先生だったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

And he made all the difference? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

その先生のおかげで、何もかもが変わったと? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

そのとおりです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Can you identify how your Japanese origin makes you a different kind of conductor? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたが日本人であることで、他の指揮者となにか違いがでているとしたら、それは何だと思いますか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I was born in China. 

小澤征爾 

僕は生まれは中国で。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And about six years old we had to move to Japan because of the war about to start. 

小澤征爾 

6歳の頃に戦争が始まりそうだと言うので、日本に引き揚げなければならなくなったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I am very Japanese, too. But my whole education ... my mother is Christian. So, we had to go to ... how you call? ... Sunday school. 

小澤征爾 

ですから僕は、根っからの日本人でもあるのです。でも僕が受けてきた教育全体を見てみると、母がクリスチャンで毎週…なんて言ったっけ?日曜学校に行かなきゃいけなかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes, I know Sunday school. Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

日曜学校ね、わかります。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

They call. And we sing hymn with organ. So, all my ear was done by Western music ... organ, church music, hymn. 

小澤征爾 

そう言いますよね。それでオルガン伴奏で賛美歌を歌って、ですから耳を鍛えてくれたのは西洋音楽、オルガンに教会音楽、賛美歌です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい、はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But I am Japanese and I grew up in Japan. All of my education were done in Japan, so then become conductor is ... I got this same question before, and I really don't know. 

小澤征爾 

それでも僕は、日本人として日本で育ちました。音楽教育も全部日本で受けましたし、そこから指揮者になって…まあ、その質問は前にも受けたことがあるのですが、実際のところ、よくわからないんですよね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

You don't know? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりませんか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I really don't know. 

小澤征爾 

本当にわからないんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

But you take some ... It was important to you when you came to the United States. I mean, you've been at the Boston Symphony for 25 years. Were you once worked with Leonard Bernstein in New York? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でも何かしらその…あなたが日本人として日本で教育を受けたことが、アメリカに来て、あなたにとって重要なことになったんでしょう。つまり、ボストン交響楽団に25年間ずっといらっしゃって、ニューヨークに居た頃は、レナード・バーンスタインとも一緒に仕事をされたんでしょう? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Right. I was in Europe. And I won a competition in Europe ... France, called the Besanaon. And there was a Charles Munch, conductor. The Charles Munch ... one, two, three. One? Two? Three conductors before me Boston.  

小澤征爾 

そのとおりです。僕はその頃はまだヨーロッパにいました。コンクールで優勝して、ヨーロッパのフランス…ブザンソンのコンクールです。そこで指揮者のシャルル・ミュンシュに出会ったんです。1人、2人、かな?1、2、…3人めですね、僕の3代前のボストン交響楽団の指揮者です。 

 

And I went crazy about him, and I wanted to study under him. And he said, ''You come to Tanglewood, then I teach you.''  

僕はシャルル・ミュンシュのことが大好きになってしまって、彼に弟子入したくなったんですよ。そうしたら「タングルウッドに来ることがあったら、教えてやろう」と言ってくれたんです。 

 

And I thought he would really teach me. He gave me only one lesson though. But I was lucky. I was invited ... he arranged ... Madame Koussevitzky invited me.  

僕は真に受けて、実際は1回きりのレッスンだったんですけどね。でも本当に運が良くて、呼んでくれたのが、亡くなられたクーセヴィツキーの奥様だったんですよ。 

 

So, I came. And studied in Tanglewood. Was wonderful for me. That what really changed my life, I guess. 

それでアメリカへ来て、タングルウッドで勉強して、僕にとっては素晴らしい経験でした。僕の人生が、本当に変わったと思いますよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

It did? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

変わりましたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

変わりましたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Because of? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それというのも… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I came first time to United States 1960. And then spend one summer, and I learned what I don't know. You know? I learned so many things. And I learn also what I didn't study.  

チャーリー・ローズ 

僕が初めてアメリカに来たのが1960年です。その時は一夏かけて、それまで全然知らなかったことを学んだんです。物凄く沢山学びました。それに、学校で教わっていなかったことも学びました。 

 

So, I started to study more, more, more. I never knew Mahler's symphony by myself. I had to study right there. Start study. 

ですから、そこからどんどん、どんどん勉強し始めたんです。マーラー交響曲なんて全然知りませんでしたし、とにかくそこで勉強しなきゃ、勉強はじめなきゃ、て思ったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And Leonard Bernstein was looking for assistant conductor. And Mrs. Koussevitzky arrange me to have a interview Lenny. 

小澤征爾 

それと、レナード・バーンスタインが副指揮者を募集しているということで、クーセヴィツキーの奥様が取りなしてくれて、レニーと面接できるようにしてくれたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうだったんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And Lenny was tour with the New York Philharmonic in Berlin September. So, I went after Tanglewood. Tanglewood, they gave me Koussevitzky Prize. 

小澤征爾 

レニーはその時、9月にベルリンで、ニューヨーク・フィルハーモニックとコンサートツアー中だったんですよ。タングルウッドでは最後に、研修生に対して授与されるクーセヴィツキー賞を、僕が頂いたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

It was very wonderful prize. 

小澤征爾 

とても光栄でした。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Who as at that time, I assume, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

当時、ボストン交響楽団の指揮者は、誰でしたっけ? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Charles Munch 

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Was then. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

当時はね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... was conductor. Oh, yeah. This is why I went to Tanglewood, Boston, Tanglewood, to get the lesson from Charles Munch. He was wonderful, but only one lesson, though. He was ... But anyway, I loved him.  

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュが指揮者でした。そうですよ、それがあるからタングルウッド、ボストン交響楽団のタングルウッドに来て、シャルル・ミュンシュからレッスンを受けたんですよ。彼は素晴らしい、でも1回きりのレッスンでしたけどね。でも、いいんです、僕は彼の大ファンですから。 

 

And Lenny, I never met Lenny. And the first time I met Lenny was in Berlin, right at next month from August ... September in Berlin.  

次にレニーですが、その時はまだ会ったことがなくて、初めてレニーに会ったのはベルリンです。タングルウッドのすぐ次の月、8月…9月ですね、ベルリンで。 

 

And, you know, he did interview. I supposed to have interview. I was ready after his concert in free radio station concert, public concert. He said ... and he come with committee and about five men ... he, me ... we went to Rififi Bar  

それで、彼が面接してくれたんです。面接することになったんです。彼がラジオ局の無料公開演奏会をしていて、その後で面接を受けるよう、僕もスケジュールを合わせていました。彼が言ったのは…彼は関係者5人位と一緒に出てきて、それで、僕も一緒に、西ベルリンのリフィフィ・バーに。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Rififi Bar. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

リフィフィ・バーですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I still remember where it is, which corner. And he ask me few musical question, and with his committee there ... it was also drinking. I'm drinking. And about 20 minutes later I think he made the decision with committee. 

小澤征爾 

今でも覚えていますよ、どこにあるのか、町のどの辺りかもね。それで彼は2,3音楽関係の質問をして、あと一緒に居た関係者の人達と…一緒に飲んでいましたよ。僕も飲んでました。話し始めて20分位で、彼は関係者の人達と、結論を出したんじゃないですかね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

To hire you? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたを採用すると? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah. And so first time I came back as assistant conductor to New York. He had always three conductors, still Carnegie Hall, mind you. So, I checked in Wellington Hotel for a few nights. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。その後、まずは戻って、副指揮者としてニューヨークに行きました。彼には常時3人の副指揮者がいました。カーネギーホールです、わかりますよね。それで、ウェリントンホテルに2,3日逗留することにしたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

And he ... so he had an influence on your life and changed your life? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、彼が、あなたの人生に影響を与えて、人生を変えたと? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. And it was wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。それも素晴らしく。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Koussevitzky was .. wasn't he conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for about 25 years? Or was he never conductor of the ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

クーセヴィツキーですが…彼はボストン交響楽団の指揮者じゃありませんでしたか?25年間くらい、それとも指揮者ではなかったか… 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Oh, yes. He was a long time. 

小澤征爾 

ええ、そうです。長い間指揮者でしたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

For a long time, 25 years. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

長い間、25年間ですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I don't know how many years. But long time Koussevitzky. 

小澤征爾 

何年かはわかりませんが、クーセヴィツキーは長いですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But I never met Koussevitzky. I was too late. 

小澤征爾 

ただ僕は、クーセヴィツキーとは会ったことがないんですよ。ずっと前の人ですからね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He was dead. 

小澤征爾 

もう亡くなっていましたから。 

 

Charlie Rose  

He was dead by the time you ... yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

彼は亡くなっていた、あなたが…そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But Leonard Bernstein told me about him, about Koussevitzky many times. 

小澤征爾 

でもレナード・バーンスタインから彼のことは、クーセヴィツキーのことは何度も話を聞きました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, but it was his wife that took an interest in you? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。ただ、あなたに興味を示してくれたのが、クーセヴィツキーの奥様だったんですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. Mrs. Koussevitzky, influenced by Charles Munch. 

小澤征爾 

そうです。クーセヴィツキーの奥様です。そして僕が影響を受けたのは、シャルル・ミュンシュです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So ... 

小澤征爾 

ですから… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Now, whatever happened between you and Charles Munch after that one lesson? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、たった1回だけのレッスンの後、シャルル・ミュンシュとはどうなったんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Oh, yeah. But, yes, he was wonderful. And then I ... after ... No, no, before that. I invite ... then I was a Ravinia Festival, Chicago 

小澤征爾 

ええ、彼は素晴らしい指揮者ですから、その後ですね…いや、前だったかな…その頃僕は、シカゴのラヴィニア音楽祭にいましてね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right, in Chicago. Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、シカゴですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Before Toronto, I was a musical director there. And I invited him. He came. He came. I went to airport with my car and pick him up, came ... And he was wonderful to watch him. You ever watch him closely? 

小澤征爾 

トロントに行く前ですから、僕が音楽監督をさせてもらっていて、彼を招待したんです。彼は来てくれました。来てくれましたよ。僕が空港まで、車で彼を迎えに行ったんです。間近で彼を見れるなんて、素晴らしいことでした。あなたは間近で彼を見たことはありますか? 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ありますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He almost like smiling to the orchestra at one point, then all orchestra sound change because he smile. 

小澤征爾 

彼はオーケストラを目の前にして、演奏中あるところでニッコリ微笑むと、オーケストラ全体の音がガラッと変わるんですよ。微笑んだことでね。 

 

Charlie Rose:  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And that's too, on a very big. 

小澤征爾 

それも、大きく変わるんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Now, what does that say to you about conducting? In terms of ... beyond what the baton does and beyond what the hand does, that you can infuse an orchestra with your entire face and body. You know? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それで、その指揮ぶりを見てどう思いましたか?つまり…指揮棒にしろ、手先にしろ、オーケストラに対して、表情だの、体全体だので、何を吹き込むことが出来るのか、ということですが。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

I ... I ... I don't know. You know, I studied under Saito, Hideo Saito. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね、何と言ったらいいか。僕は指揮を齋藤秀雄先生に学んだんですが。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Wonderful teacher, cellist, studied Germany. And all the details, all the musical details, all this construction, all this ... phrasing, he taught me. 

小澤征爾 

素晴らしい先生で、チェロも弾く方です。ドイツで学んだ方ですが、細かいこと、音楽面での細かいこと、曲の作り方、これ全部、フレーズの持ってゆきかたも、彼は僕に教えてくれました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, that's all my knowledge and my experience. And then, you know, Tanglewood, and right after Tanglewood, I was chosen to be four of the ... one of the four students, of Maestro von Karajan. 

小澤征爾 

それで、それが全部、僕の知識と経験の基本になっているんです。その後ですね、タングルウッドに来て、その直後に、カラヤン先生の指導を受けれる4人の1人に選ばれたんです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

In Berlin. 

小澤征爾 

ベルリンでね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Herbert von Karajan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ヘルベルト・フォン・カラヤンのことですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yeah, that was also wonderful to study one year. 

小澤征爾 

そうです、1年間素晴らしい勉強をさせてもらいました。 

 

Charlie Rose  

What did you learn from him? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

カラヤンからどんなことを学びましたか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

You know what he does? Many people misunderstand him because he look very ... every picture he look very ... 

小澤征爾 

彼の仕事ぶりはご存知ですか?多くの人が彼を誤解しています。というのも、彼は見かけが…どの写真を見ても、見かけが… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Stern and formidable. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

いかめしくて、物々しいですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And he is. First, you know, time when I saw him. But, when you know him ... took me about 15 years after I met him -- first time I was student, become very close. I feel very close. 

小澤征爾 

そうなんですよ。僕が初めて彼を目の前で見た時はですね、そうでした。でも、彼の人となりを知って、その15年後に、彼が僕を呼んでくれて、そこで会った時は…最初に生徒として出会った時は、とても親しく、親しくしてくれたと感じましたね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And, after I become very close to him, I can call any time. I know, when I call, he may say, ''Seiji, I'm busy.'' Kung! That doesn't mean anything. He hates me or not. 

小澤征爾 

それで、彼と親しくなった後も、別にいつ連絡をとっても構わないと言われています。それで実際に連絡を取ると、「セイジ、今忙しいんだ」といって、ガチャンと切られる。別に意味はないんですよ。僕のことを嫌いとかそうでないとか。 

 

Charlie Rose  

It's not personal. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

懐に入りづらい人ですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He just busy. 

小澤征爾 

単に忙しいだけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でしょうけどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

And I was not lucky to catch him on nice time. I thought .... 

小澤征爾 

丁度いい時に彼を捕まえられる、運に恵まれていないだけです。そう思って… 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I call back again. And then sometimes a half hour by talk telephone. 

小澤征爾 

それで、後から電話をかけ直すと、時には30分くらい電話で話しますよ。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa:  

And it's wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

それも素晴らしいことです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

But did he give you something musically? I mean, did you learn something important that helped you in your own evolution? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ただ、彼は何か音楽的なことを、あなたに教えてくれたんですか?つまり、あなたが指揮者として成長する上で、助けになるような、そういう大事なことは教えてくれたんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Yes. You know what he did was-- his basic thing is very interesting, like chamber music, play, a musician makes sound. 

小澤征爾 

ええ。彼が教えてくれたのはですね、彼の基本は、とても面白いですよ。室内楽みたいにですね、演奏する、つまり音を鳴らすのは、演奏者であるということです。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ほお。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

This he feel everybody have listen each other to ... listening each other to make music. And his way is put everybody that condition. You know, he conducts, but even he sometimes close his eyes. 

小澤征爾 

彼の感じ方というのは、全員がお互い聴き合えと、お互い聴きあって音楽を作るんだと。彼のやり方は、全員をそういう状態に持ってゆく、ということです。つまり、彼は指揮を降るんですが、目を閉じてしまうことも時々あります。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

But he ask everybody to listen and watch each other to make music together. That ... even he ask this opera. You know, thing that's on stage?  

小澤征爾 

でも彼は、奏者全員にお互い聴きあって、視線を合わせて、そうやって音楽を一緒に作れ、と言うのです。それは…彼はオペラをやる時も、それを要求してきます。わかります?舞台上でですよ。 

 

Let's say, like, Falstaff ... example sing a soloist. Orchestras are here. He ask both side to listen each other, which is not so easy because of a distance.  

例えば、ヴェルディの「ファルスタッフ」で、ソリストが歌って、オーケストラが居て、両方にお互い聴きあえ、と要求するんです。こんなの簡単じゃないですよ。距離がありますからね。 

 

But he really insist. That, I think, basic his way. That one technical way or basic thing. Other thing is he has-- when he taught us Sibelius, when I tried to busy conducting everybody ... he said, ''No, no, no, no. That orchestra member, they do it. You have to make long phrase, long line.'' 

それでも彼は、絶対そうしろというんです。これ、僕の考えですが、彼のやり方の基本になっているんでしょうね。技術的な面にせよ、基本にせよね。もう1つは、彼はですね…シベリウスの曲の指揮を教えてくれたときなんですが、僕が必死に指揮をしていると、彼が言うんです「違う、違う、そんなことは楽団員の仕事だ、君はフレーズの大きな流れを作って示せば良いんだよ。」 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

That his ... you can imagine that he does that, too. 

小澤征爾 

それが彼の…わかりますか、彼のやり方です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Sure, sure. Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

He was wonderful was for that. And my teacher Saito, Hideo, was very detailed, very much, very clear. 

小澤征爾 

そのことについては、彼は本当に素晴らしいと思います。僕が教わった齋藤秀夫先生は、とにかく細かいところまで、とにかく盛りだくさん、とにかく分かりやすくハッキリ、でしたから。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

You know? Cut. So ... and the Lenny was a big heart, you know? 

小澤征爾 

カラヤンは「全部いらない!」というわけです。そして…レニーですが、彼は、とにかく心の広い人です。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Yeah, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

So, I was very lucky these three ... 

小澤征爾 

ですから、僕は本当に幸運なことに、この3人の… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Boy, you have really have had extraordinary ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ですよね、本当に素晴らしい指導者の… 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Actually four.  

小澤征爾 

実際は4人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

... influences. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

影響を受けられましたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa  

Saito. 

小澤征爾 

齋藤先生も入れて4人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose  

Saito. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

齋藤先生ね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And Charles Munch. 

小澤征爾 

それとシャルル・ミュンシュですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Charles Munch. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

シャルル・ミュンシュですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Maestro von Karajan. And Lenny as my boss ... I was assistant. 

小澤征爾 

カラヤン先生、それと、僕のボスのレニー、僕が副指揮者を… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... more than two years, you know? And so-- And Lenny was really genius. And I call him ''wonderful American man.'' 

小澤征爾 

2年以上務めました。それからですね、レニーは本当に天才ですよ。僕は彼のことを「素晴らしきアメリカ人」と呼んでいます。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Tried to be free. Tried to be fair. To equal. You know, colleague? Even though I was small. 

小澤征爾 

自由に、公正に、公平にを心がけていましたよね。それも、仲間として。僕なんかウンと小さい存在だったのにですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He big. Equal, wonderful though. I have many memories. 

小澤征爾 

彼は人間が大きくて、誰に対しても平等で、本当に素晴らしい人です。思い出も沢山あります。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Is your-- today, having lived in Boston, having a reputation as being a Red Sox fan, true and true. Do you think of yourself as Chinese? As Japanese? As American? Or all? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

あなたは、今ボストンにご自宅があって、レッドソックスの筋金入りのファンだとの評判です。あなたはご自身を、中国人、日本人、アメリカ人、どれだと思っていますか?それとも、どの要素もあると 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

I am very Japanese. 

小澤征爾 

まったくの日本人ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But also, when I come back to Boston from my holiday or visit in Japan ... to Japan ... from Japan to come back, I feel like I came home-- came back to home. 

小澤征爾 

でも同時にですね、休暇からボストンに戻ってくると、あるいは日本に居て、日本に行って、日本から戻ってくると、ああ、家に帰ってきたな、て感じますね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Back to Boston is ... 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ボストンに帰ってきたな、と。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Back to Boston ... home. 

小澤征爾 

ボストンに、家に帰ってきたな、と感じますね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

... home. Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

家に帰ってきた、なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, in that moment, I guess I'm a Bostonian. 

小澤征爾 

ですから、そんな時は、僕はボストニアンだな、と思っています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

American. And America is like my country. That's-- I think, everybody feels that way. When-- if you live-- this country has this kind of a character, everybody feel this is our country, “my country.”' 

小澤征爾 

アメリカ人、アメリカは自分の国みたいなものです。それは、皆そう感じているんじゃないでしょうかね。もしこの国に家を持って、このkにはそういう性格があるでしょう、皆そう感じていますよ、この国は私達の国、自分の国だ、とね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

What did it mean to you to conduct at the Olympics in 1998? Five symphonies ... Beethoven's 

チャーリー・ローズ 

1998年のオリンピックで指揮をなさいましたけど、あなたにとってどんな経験になりましたか?5大陸からオーケストラが、ベートーヴェンの… 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Beethoven Ninth, finale. 

小澤征爾 

ベートーヴェンの第9の最終楽章ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Finale. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

最終楽章ですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You watch that. It's Opening Ceremony. 

小澤征爾 

ご覧になりましたか、開会式ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Billions watching you. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

勿論です、数十億人の視線があなたに集まったわけですからね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Yes. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Billions. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

数十億人ですよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But was very dangerous thing I got ... I had the idea, you know? Five continent, Olympic, you know? Five continent. 

小澤征爾 

でもあれは、本当にヒヤヒヤしました。あの案を受けたときはね。5大陸から、オリンピックで、5大陸からですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

To play together, same moment. 

小澤征爾 

同時に一緒に演奏しよう、というわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

I am in concert hall in Nagano. 

小澤征爾 

僕は長野市内の音楽ホールにいました。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, in Nagano. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね、長野でした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And about 10 minutes by car there was a huge Olympic ... how you call this? ... you know, the Opening Ceremony, many, many thousand people there. Very cold. And 3,000 chorus people, an actual Japanese chorus. They memorized Beethoven Ninth, finale -- whole thing. 

小澤征爾 

車で10分くらい行ったところに、大きなオリンピックの…なんて言ったっけ、オリンピックの開会式ですよ、何千人も人が居て、とても寒い中、3000人の合唱団、これは日本人の合唱団です。ベートーヴェンの第9の最終楽章を、全部楽譜を見ないで、憶えて歌ったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And they rehearsed with me with orchestra. Orchestra was combination pick-up orchestra from all over, from Vienna, from Berlin, Paris, London, America, Boston, San Francisco, China, Beijing, Japanese orchestra, blah, blah, blah, Russian -- everybody there. And then five continent, United Nation, Boston Chorus, Tanglewood Festival Chorus, and Beijing Chorus, and German-- Berlin Chorus. 

小澤征爾 

それで、オーケストラと一緒にリハーサルをやるわけです。オーケストラのメンバーは、ウィーン、ベルリン、パリ、ロンドン、アメリカ、ボストン、サンフランシスコ、中国、北京、日本国内からも、それからロシア、世界中からの奏者の合同合奏です。そして、5大陸、国連本部、ボストンの合唱団、タングルウッド・フェスティバル合唱団、それから北京の合唱団、それと、ドイツはベルリンの合唱団は… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Chorus. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

合唱団が各地からね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... in Brandenburg Gate, very late night, early morning, early, early morning. 

小澤征爾 

ブランデンブルク門から、あそこは夜ウンと遅い時間、日付が変わって、ほとんど早朝の時間でしたね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

でしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And Africa, Capetown Chorus. 

小澤征爾 

それから、アフリカのケープタウンの合唱団。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでした。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I conduct orchestra, and they sing watching my beat to ... 

小澤征爾 

そして僕は、オーケストラの指揮を担当して、皆が僕の指揮を見て、拍を取るわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Oh, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... sing together. And you know, when you watch the CNN News ... 

小澤征爾 

それで一緒に歌うわけです。あのですね、例えばCNNのテレビでニュースなんかを見ると… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

はい。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... when you question, the person who answer ... 

小澤征爾 

司会者が質問すると、答える人が… 

 

Charlie Rose 

By satellite. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

衛星中継のことですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But two second, one second 

小澤征爾 

1,2秒位… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Still ... “Ah, yes, yes. Yes, yes.”' You know that moment delay? 

小澤征爾 

じっとして…「あ、ええ、ええ」なんて、一瞬遅れるじゃないですか。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. Yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうです、そのとおりです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That delay was enemy for us because, you know satellite takes time. And NHK, one man .. 

小澤征爾 

あれはいけない、衛星中継だと間があくんですよね。そこでNHKのある方が… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, in Japan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ、日本の放送局ですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

National Company made machine to make this ... 

小澤征爾 

日本の国営放送の技術スタッフさんが用意してくれたのが… 

 

Charlie Rose 

One. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

一体化するために。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

All together, one. 

小澤征爾 

皆が一つにまとまるためにですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I tell you very simple. I mean, simple but it's very difficult to do. He hold our sound, like close it sound, our sound, orchestra sound wait until latest one, which is from South Africa and also Sydney, comes latest one, until latest one arrive moment, hold it.  

小澤征爾 

単純なものの言い方をしましたけれど、単純ですけど、物凄く難しいことです。そのスタッフの方が、僕らが鳴らす音を保留にして、音をしまい込むように、オーケストラの音が、一番遅く飛んでくる音を待つんです。南アフリカと、シドニーからのが、一番遅かったかな。一番最後の音が飛んでくるまで、保留にするんです。 

 

And then put together, then on the air. So, when you on the air, comes ... was delay of our sound. The machine hold earlier sound until latest sound comes. 

それを一つに合わせて、発信する。ですから発信する時は、僕らのオーケストラの音は、遅れます。機械が、一番最後に飛んでくる音を、一番最初に鳴らした音が待つように、保留にするんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, a second later. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね、1秒差がありますからね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Yeah. But that ... going like ...Whup! Together. Can you imagine? 

小澤征爾 

そうです、でもそうやって、こう…ドン!と一緒に、わかりますか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますとも。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That means, mechanically together, right? 

小澤征爾 

つまり、機械が一つにまとめてくれるわけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But musically together is another question. You understand? 

小澤征爾 

ただ、音楽的に一体感がでるかどうかは、別問題ですけどね。わかりますか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

どういうことですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

When I conduct, even same stage sometimes not together or opera off-stage band could be not together, can be not together. Could be catastrophe. So, I was so nervous. 

小澤征爾 

指揮をしている時は、同じ舞台上にいるときでさえ、一体感が出ないことがあります。オペラの舞台裏で吹いているバンダとか、一体感が出ないことがあります。大混乱になるかもしれないんですよ。ですから神経を使います。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Because everybody rehearse and everything was set up with lots of work. I conduct. And, if not together, that moment everybody will laugh at me because many people said, ''Seiji, that's too dangerous.'' 

小澤征爾 

ですから皆が事前に練習して、全部を沢山手間ひまかけて、整えて作って、僕が指揮を振る。もし揃って演奏できなかったら、その瞬間笑われるのは僕です。というのも、事前に多くの人から言われていたんです「セイジ、そのプランは危険すぎるよ。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それはそうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

''Don't do that.'' And lucky. General rehearsal could be only that morning, about two hours before ceremony-- was together. It was quite together.  

小澤征爾 

「やめとけよ」でも、運が良かったんです。全体練習は1回だけ、当日の午前中だけです。2時間後に開会式、というところでした。揃ったんです、完璧に揃ったんです。 

 

And two hours rest, come back again, do it again. And, again, more, even more together. So, at end was almost miracle. We have very good luck. Musically very together.  

2時間休憩して、配置について、もう一度、いよいよ本場です。本番は更に揃い方が良かったです。終わった瞬間、奇跡だと思いました。本当に運が良かった。音楽的にも、素晴らしい一体感でした。 

 

Of course, machine was together. So, what do you hear? It's together like no problem, but could be. Could have been a big problem, you know? 

勿論、機械も一緒にお手柄です。ですから、本番どうでしたか?全く問題なく、揃って演奏できました。でも危なかったですよ。メチャクチャになる可能性はありましたよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. Boy, you must have ... at the end of that you must have said, ''Whew.'' 

チャーリー・ローズ 

いやはや、そうでしたか。終わった瞬間、あなたとしては「ふー!やれやれ!」といったところですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

''Ooof.'' 

小澤征爾 

「ふー!やれやれ!」ですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And, of course, I had to thank all those conductors, my colleagues... 

小澤征爾 

それから勿論、僕の仲間達に指揮者として演奏に加わってもらったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうなんですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

...who, you know, also conducted. To watch, you know, my ... the monitor is too small to watch for a big chorus so some assistant conducting ... my colleague conduct with monitor. So, that people must be very good. 

小澤征爾 

彼らも棒を振ってくれたんです。大合唱団が、僕の姿をモニターで見るには、モニターは小さすぎますから、僕の仲間達が、僕の姿をモニターで見て、棒を振ってくれたんです。彼らの手柄が素晴らしかったんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

So, they can see. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうやって、奏者全員が指揮を確認できたわけですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Wonderful. 

小澤征爾 

本当に素晴らしかったです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. The Boston Symphony Orchestra ... What do you hope that you have accomplished there? What have you brought to the orchestra that you are proud about? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。さて、ボストン交響楽団についてですが…あなたとしては、このオーケストラで成し遂げたいことはありますか?ご自分自身、胸を張って、これをオーケストラにもたらす、というものは何ですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You know, before Koussevitzky, I do not know. But Koussevitzky I know from disk, from what Leonard Bernstein told me. 

小澤征爾 

そうですね、クーセヴィツキーが以前どうしていたかは、僕は知りません。勿論、クーセヴィツキーの演奏は、CDでも知っていますし、レナード・バーンスタインから話は聞いています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしょうね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He must be ... he was ... he must be very colorful man and very romantic, colorful conductor. And then Charles Munch came. He was French and also conducted the German repertoire, but more like very French and the orchestra become very colorful, sensitive, beautiful sound and color. 

小澤征爾 

きっと彼は、とても華やかで、ロマンチックで、華やかな指揮者だったんでしょう。その後が、シャルル・ミュンシュです。フランス人指揮者で、勿論ドイツ系の音楽もレパートリーとしていましたけれど、彼はどちらかと言えばフランスの色合いがうんと強いですから、オーケストラも華やかで、繊細で、美しい色合いになるわけです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

When I arrived, great Boston Symphony Orchestra, colorful, wonderful. But I wanted also Boston Symphony to be like German orchestra, like heavier sound. 

小澤征爾 

僕は、この偉大なボストン交響楽団に就任したわけです。素晴らしいオーケストラで、華やかで、でも僕としては、ボストン交響楽団には、ドイツ系の、もう少し重厚な音が出せるようになってほしいな、と思ったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Like von Karajan. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ヘルベルト・フォン・カラヤンばりですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Rich sound. 

小澤征爾 

ふくよかなサウンドですね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And my teacher, Saito, studied in Germany. So, very much German style. So, my education was all German. My piano teacher was a specialist for Bach, Johann Sebastian Bach ... played piano.  

小澤征爾 

それから僕が教わった齋藤先生が、ドイツで学んだこともあって、物凄くドイツ系のやり方で、僕が受けた教育も、全部ドイツ系でした。ピアノ先生もバッハ、ヨハン・セバスティアン・バッハがご専門でした。ピアノで弾く曲がね。 

 

So, and I was thinking maybe Boston Symphony could become heavier sound, deeper sound, let's say ... deeper. But took me long time-- not one year, two year ... maybe 10 years. After ... I didn't realize, but I recognized, ''Oh, they changed. We changed it.''  

ですから、多分ボストン交響楽団も重厚感や深みのあるサウンドになっていくのかな、と考えていました。重厚感、ですね。でも時間がかかりました。1年や2年でなくて、10年位経った頃ですかね、意識はしなかったのですが、なんとなく感じたのが「あら、音が変わった。変わったよ」 

 

I think Boston Symphony are ready ... Now, we are ready both ... and the wonderful thing is, you know, when become deeper sound and darker sound for German repertoire like Brahms, Beethoven, Bruckner, Mahler, all this ... I afraid we lose colorful area, sensitive area. No. That tradition is so strong. 

僕が思うには、ボストン交響楽団というのは、出来上がっていると言うか、両方とも出来上がっていると言うか、これってスゴイことなんですけれど、サウンドに深みと渋みが増して、ドイツ系の楽曲、例えばブラームスベートーヴェンブルックナーマーラー、こういうの全部、もしかしたら今まで華やかだった部分が失われてしまうかな、と思うでしょう。ところが違うんです。その伝統は強固に守られているんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

You mean all the things that Munch brought. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それは、シャルル・ミュンシュがもたらした部分、ということですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Munch brought. 

小澤征爾 

シャルル・ミュンシュがもたらした部分です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No, we didn't lose. When they face Berlioz, become colorful again. But still they play wonderful, you know, Bernard Haitink, one of the German-type conductor comes, they play wonderful Brahms. 

小澤征爾 

そこは失われていなかったんです。ベルリオーズの曲をやる時は、華やかさがたちまち戻ってきます。ベルナルト・ハイティンクという、彼はドイツ系の音楽のタイプの指揮者ですけれど、彼が来た時は、ボストン交響楽団は素晴らしいブラームスの演奏をしました。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Or wonderful Mahler. When comes French repertoire, they play colorful. 

小澤征爾 

マーラーも素晴らしかったです。フランスの楽曲を演奏する時は、華やかさが演奏に出てくるんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, tradition there, but become wider. I think that's-- I mean, not just me. You know, everybody's work. And we needed to do this. American orchestra must have a big repertoire. 

小澤征爾 

ですから、受け継いだ伝統はしっかりとあって、オーケストラの演奏の幅が広がってゆくんです。これって、僕だけの手柄ではないと思います。全員の成果です。そしてこれこそが、僕達にとって必要なものなのです。アメリカのオーケストラというものは、レパートリーは沢山無いといけませんから。 

 

Charlie Rose 

When you ... when you set out to achieve that, is it about teaching a new repertoire to an orchestra ... is it also about changing an orchestra? Players, as well as the mind-set of an orchestra? I mean, it's gotta be more than just saying, ''Well, from now on we're gonna focus on a different kind of repertoire.'' 

チャーリー・ローズ 

新しいレパートリーをオーケストラに教えるときというのは、オーケストラ自体を変えてゆくことになるんですか?演奏者全体、それから1個の楽団としての発想も変えてゆくことになるんですか?つまりですね、「それじゃあ今から、全く違うレパートリーに集中するようになるからね」などと、宣言する、それ以上のことをすることになるんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No. 

小澤征爾 

とんでもない、違います。 

 

Charlie Rose 

No? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

違うんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

It doesn't work that way. You know, the orchestra members, you know, remind you, 100 musician or 99 musician ... 

小澤征爾 

そんなやり方をしたら、うまくいきません。よろしいですか、オーケストラのメンバーというのは、100人、正確には99人の… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... Boston Symphony. Everybody come from different school, even different country now, you know? 

小澤征爾 

ボストン交響楽団、それぞれ出身の音楽学校も、出身国も違います。そうですよね? 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And different school, different mind. So, it's ... everybody has a different idea, but when conductor comes to show which direction this piece, this conductor ... let's say, me ... I think this, this way. They try to be together, and so everything is done so sensitive thing. I cannot say, ''This style must be heavy German style.'' No. Doesn't work that way.  

小澤征爾 

学んだ学校が違って、考え方が違って、それぞれが違う考え方を持っているんです。なのに、指揮者が来て、この曲の方向性は、この指揮者は、例えば僕が来て、このやり方で、とか、そうなると、メンバー達は一つにまとまろうとしてくれるんですよ。ですから、一つ一つ、やること全てが、気を遣うんです。「これは絶対重厚なドイツ系の音楽だ」とか、僕は絶対言えません。そんなやり方をしたら、うまくいきませんから。 

 

We have to slowly to make... I show. They show what they think. I show what I think. And then combination with ... I remind you. Conductor, no conductor makes sound, you know? Except some noise. 

僕達はゆっくり作っていかないと行けないんです。僕が示すもの、メンバー達が示すもの、僕の考えを示して、そうやって組み合わせていく中で…だいたいですね、指揮者なんて、何の音も発信しないじゃないですか、変な雑音を立てるだけですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah, right. Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そりゃそうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

They make. So, it's wonderful, this combination of ...like, big ship moving ... 

小澤征爾 

音を発信するのはメンバー達です。ですから、この組み合わせ方が素晴らしいものになってゆく…丁度大きな船が動き出すようにですね… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Slowly. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ゆっくりとですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... or this way. And that's wonderful thing. It mix, and then come out one thing. And audience hear one, but inside it's many different things. And it's-- I think it's a wonderful thing. 

小澤征爾 

そういうことです。これって、素晴らしいことなんですよ。混ざりあって、一つのものが出来上がる。一つになったものをお客さんが聴く。でもその中身は、色々異なるものが沢山組み合わさったものなんです。そしてこれこそが、僕達の演奏の素晴らしさだと思っています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Is it good for an orchestra to have one conductor for so long? Is it good for a conductor to stay with one orchestra so long? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

オーケストラにとって、1人の指揮者が長期間いるというのは、良いことなんですか?指揮者にとって、1つのオーケストラに長くとどまるというのは、良いことなんですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You have to ask my orchestra if it's good to have a long orchestra. But for me, my type is I stay long, one area, and then work slowly and grew up with group. You know, I really grew up with Boston Symphony.  

小澤征爾 

それは楽団に訊いてほしいですね。でも僕にとっては、僕みたいな人間にとっては、1つのところに長く居て、少しずつゆっくり仕事をして、楽団と一緒に成長してゆく、僕は本当に、ボストン交響楽団とともに成長したんです。 

 

I learn so many things while I'm working. And I was lucky because of my Maestro von Karajan, I ... before I came to Boston I was conducting every year one or two, even three programs in Berlin, and then also studied in Salzburg in opera and also the conducting Vienna Philharmonic.  

ここで指揮者をしている間に、本当にたくさんのことを学びました。そして僕は幸運なことに、カラヤン先生のおかげで…僕はボストン交響楽団に来る前は、毎年1,2回、場合によっては3回、ベルリン・フィルのプログラムをやらせてもらっていました。それから、ザルツブルクでオペラを勉強させてもらったりい、ウィーン・フィルハーモニー管弦楽団の指揮もさせてもらいました。 

 

And all ... this is why I conducted many European orchestras and Boston Symphony, many programs every year.  

これ全部…このおかげで、ヨーロッパのオーケストラを沢山指揮させてもらったおかげで、ボストン交響楽団で、毎年沢山の曲をプログラムに挙げることができるわけです。 

 

I remind you, Tanglewood is our summer home in Berkshire. Every year we have eight weeks, Act program, and we live together there -- you know? 

ご存知ですよね、マサチューセッツ州バークシャー郡にあるタングルウッド、ここがボストン交響楽団の夏の家のようなものです。毎年8週間ここで一緒に生活をするんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

We share same grocery shop and same lake. We lived so ... we really ... I really become part of family. That's for me is wonderful. For orchestra, you know, now because of, I think, airplane or because of CD. You go shop ... 

小澤征爾 

おなじ食料品店を利用して、同じ湖の畔に滞在して、生活をともにして、 僕は本当の家族の一員になる、そんな感じです。僕にとってはこれがすごく良いんです。オーケストラにとっても、今はCDもあるし、飛行機もあるし、CDなんてどこでも買えるし… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Sure. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

... You can buy anything now. Or any conductor you can fly in. Right? Technically it's true. So ... But still one conductor stay. It's one area, and then many great guest conductor comes. Like food. You know? It's like, you like have this food and that food, but major ... I don't know. You ... half of your question I can answer. And half I cannot answer. 

小澤征爾 

何でも買って手に入ります。指揮者も、飛行機でひとっ飛びです。科学技術のおかげで、確かにそうなんですが、それでも1人の指揮者が1つのオーケストラに居て、大変な実力のある指揮者が、数多く振りに来る。毎日の食事と一緒ですよ。これも食べる、あれも食べる、でも1つ中心に据えるものがあって…わかりません。半分は僕が答えられますが、半分は僕にはわかりません。 

 

Charlie Rose 

That for you it's right to be there so you can live with and have and grow with and be part of a family? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

それじゃあ、あなたにとっては、ボストン交響楽団というのは共に暮らし共に成長し家族の一員となるそれに相応しいということですか? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Only problem ... because I stay one area... 

小澤征爾 

1つだけ問題が…僕は1つの場所に居て… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ええ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Twenty-five years went so fast. 

小澤征爾 

25年間があっという間に過ぎてしまったこと、これが問題です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

It's so fast. Yeah. 

小澤征爾 

本当にあっという間に過ぎてしまったんですよ 

 

Charlie Rose 

I always ask this, and ... if you could play one last concert with your orchestra in Boston, one last concert, what would want to play? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

これ、いつも質問することなんですがもしあなたが、人生最後のコンサートをここボストン交響楽団行うとしたら演奏したい曲はなんですか 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

In my life? 

小澤征爾 

人生最後の、ですか? 

 

Charlie Rose 

In your life. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

人生最後のです 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Too bad that I cannot use whole orchestra. And whole orchestra I won't use because Boston Symphony is 99 musicians. 

小澤征爾 

これ言ってしまったら悪いかなオーケストラ全員要らない曲なんですよねボストン交響楽団99人いるのでね。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But this piece only need about one third of Boston Symphony. But ''St. Matthew's Passion'' by Johann Sebastian Bach.  

小澤征爾 

でもこの曲は、ボストン交響楽団の1/3のメンバーで演奏する曲なんです。その曲とは、ヨハン・セバスティアン・バッハの「マタイ受難曲」ですね。 

 

That piece is something for me very special. If it is my last concert in my life. 

この曲は僕にとって、本当に特別な曲なんです。もし人生最後の、というなら、この曲です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうですか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

That's all about Jesu, who suffer and finished ... kill. They killed him, then what is after. He suffer and this. But that's not very-- maybe not right because cannot use all my colleague. 

小澤征爾 

この曲はイエス・キリストの、受難と最後を描いた曲です…処刑されるところまでですね。イエスが処刑されて、その後、イエスの受難とかそういう曲です。でも、これは駄目だな、なにせメンバー全員が演奏に参加できないからな。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. You were ... you had ... you're OK now. You were sick for a while. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりました。ところで、最近しばらく体調を崩しておられましたよね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

No, I was sick. I had the flu. 

小澤征爾 

ええ、流行りの風邪に罹ってしまいましてね 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたか。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Like 'monia type of ... You know, this very new word for me. Och, I forgot already ...a type of flu... 'monia-like. 

小澤征爾 

気管支の炎症みたいな病気ですよ、なんだろう、僕には初めて聞く病名で、忘れちゃった、ナントカ炎みたいな感じです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Pneumonia, was it? 

チャーリー・ローズ 

肺炎でしょ? 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

You know? Last September. I went to Russia. 

小澤征爾 

去年の9月に、ロシアに行ったときなんですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

One week with the Mstislav Rostovobich, he's my big brother. And he said, ''Seiji, we go Russia because of Japanese people and the Russian people must understand more and the culture is more important than politic and music is best.'' 

小澤征爾 

1週間ムスティスラフ・ロストロポーヴィチと一緒だったんです。彼は僕の兄貴分みたいなものです。彼がこう言ったんですよ「セイジ、一緒にロシアに行こう。日本の人達とロシアの人達は、お互い理解し合うことが必要だ。文化は政治なんかより大事だ。中でも音楽が一番だ。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そのとおりですね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, he ask me. And big brother said, ''Seiji, come.'' So, I went with the Japanese Orchestra, a new Japan Philharmonic, one week right after Saito Kinen Festival, which is very good festival for me. You know, Saito is my professor's name. 

小澤征爾 

それで、彼が頼んできたんです。兄貴は「セイジ、来いよ」と言うんです。ですから日本のオーケストラ、新日本フィルハーモニー交響楽団と一緒に、サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルの丁度1週間後です。サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルは僕にとって大切な音楽祭なんですよ。サイトウは、齋藤秀雄先生のサイトウですよ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

わかりますよ。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Saito Kinen Festival in Matsumoto in country. We went to Russia and have a concert very quickly, and then I took airplane, come back to Boston in airplane. I asked if temperature high. It was 'monia, like light 'monia. I forgot name of-- type of 'monia ... usually young people get, I understand, but I got it. 

小澤征爾 

サイトウ・キネン・フェスティバルが松本で開催されて、ロシアに行って、コンサートを1回すぐに開いて、その後飛行機に飛び乗って、ボストンに戻る飛行機にの中で、あれ?熱があるかな?と思ったんです。何かの炎症、ナントカ炎みたいな、名前が思い出せないな、普通は若い人が罹るっ病気らしいですけど、でも僕が罹ってしまったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほど。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

So, about three weeks I was flat. I missed many things ... big ceremony of 25th anniversary concert  ... 

小澤征爾 

おかげで3週間寝たきりです。沢山キャンセルしないとならなくなって、その中には、25周年の記念コンサートもありましたし… 

 

Charlie Rose 

Right, right. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Who conducted was Robert Shaw, who died. 

小澤征爾 

代わりに、ロバート・ショーがやってくれました。最近(1999年)亡くなってしまいましたが。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Robert Shaw, yes. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ロバート・ショー、そうでしたね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

He's also dead now. But now I'm fine. 

小澤征爾 

彼は代役をしてくれましたが、今は亡くなってしまいました。僕はもう回復しています。 

 

Charlie Rose 

OK. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なによりです。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Again I flu ... last two months ago I got the flu again. Everybody get flu. I said, ''I don't get flu because I had already a big one beginning of season.'' 

小澤征爾 

そして、2ヶ月前に、また流行りの風邪に罹ってしまったんです。風邪は誰もがひくものですが、僕はこう言ったんですよ「季節の頭にひどい風邪に罹ったから、罹らないと思っていた。」 

 

Charlie Rose 

You're now immune. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

今は免疫が出来ているでしょう。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

And I got. 

小澤征爾 

でも罹ってしまったんです。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Yeah. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

なるほどね。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

But I'm fine. 

小澤征爾 

今は大丈夫です。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Great. It's an honor to have you here. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

良かったです。今日はお越しいただき、ありがとうございました。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Thank you. 

小澤征爾 

こちらこそ。 

 

Charlie Rose 

Many more years with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and all that you do at Tanglewood and other places. A pleasure. 

チャーリー・ローズ 

ボストン交響楽団でのご活躍、そしてタングルウッド、その他世界各地でのご活躍、今後も長く続きますよう、お祈りいたします。今日はありがとうございました。 

 

Seiji Ozawa 

Thank you. 

小澤征爾 

ありがとうございました。 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5ZxF8suhmY 

 

Hector Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Op.14 

サイトウ・キネン・オーケストラ 

指揮:小澤征爾 

英日対訳:マーレイド・ネスビット(愛蘭、Vn)2020WMUR:動き回る訳/アイルランド音楽の魅力

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-exwrt_eV_4 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

Máiréad is interviewed by Erin Fehlau host and anchor on @WMUR  award winning news magazine New Hampshire Chronicle March 25th 2020.  

マーレイド・ネスビットへのインタビュー 

アンカー&聞き手:エリン・フェフラウ 

WMURテレビ 報道番組 

「ニュー・ハンプシャー・クロニクル」2020年3月25日放送分 

 

 

[Music] 

 

Erin Fehlau 

She leaps and twirls all without missing a note. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

このように、飛んだり跳ねたり、クルクル回っても、一つも音を間違えることはありません。 

 

Máiréad Nesbitt 

That's something I love. Myself, as a performer, is freedom of movement when I play. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

私自身、こうするのが大好きなんです。弾き手としては、自分が演奏する時は、自由に体が動き回れる、これなんです。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Celtic violinist Máiréad Nesbitt has toured the globe and now this famed fiddler from Ireland calls New Hampshire home.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

ケルティック・バイオリニスト」として活躍中の、マーレイド・ネスビットさん。世界を舞台に活躍中です。アイルランド出身の「フィドルの名人」は、ここニュー・ハンプシャーを「自分の住まい」と呼んでくれています。 

 

MN 

I'm so delighted to be here in New Hampshire because it reminds me so much of Ireland. It's like Ireland on a good day. It's so beautiful. The mountains and lakes, the trees. It really is like Ireland on quite a grand scale.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ここニュー・ハンプシャーに家を持つことが出来て、とても嬉しいです。ここにいるとアイルランドのことが、沢山思い出すことが出来るからです。古き良き日のアイルランド、て感じです。山が連なって、湖がそこかしこにあって、木々が茂って、広々としたアイルランド、そんな感じです。 

 

EF 

Mairead took to the stage in her new home state charming the crowd at the Buzz Ball. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女の新たなホームグラウンド「バズ・ボール」(ニュー・ハンプシャーコンコルド)のオーディエンスは、もうマーレイドさんに夢中です。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

She's seen the world performing first with “Lord of the Dance,” and then as a founding member of “Celtic Woman.” 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女はまず「Lord of the Dance」で舞台での本格的な演奏をスタートさせ、その後、「ケルティック・ウーマン」結成当初のメンバーとなります。 

 

MN 

Every album has been number one on the Billboard world music charts, and then my last album that I did with them was destiny. And that was nominated for the Grammy.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

リリースするアルバムが、どれもビルボード・チャートの世界ランキングトップに入って、そのあとメンバーと一緒に作った私の最新アルバムが、これが運命的でした。グラミー賞にもノミネートしていただきましたしね。 

 

EF 

The New York Times once called her “a demon of a fiddle player,” a title she embraces with pride.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

ニューヨーク・タイムズ」が、かつて彼女を「悪魔のフィドル奏者」と書いたことがあります。彼女はこれを誇りに思っているとのことです。 

 

MN 

I take that as a huge compliment. I think what they meant, well, what I took from us, is that I think it might have been my movement, and also the way I play like when I hone in on something I really try and grasp it. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

これは私にとっては、スゴイ褒め言葉です。私が舞台上で動き回れる様子のこを、多分言っているんでしょう。それと、本気で取り組んで自分のものにしようとする、そういうものを研ぎ澄まそうとする、そんな演奏の仕方のことを言っているんだと思います。 

 

There's a word in Ireland called “a dervish,” and a “dervish” is a twirling spirit, you know. And I think maybe it was a little bit of that too. 

アイルランドには「デーヴィシュ」という言葉があります。クルクル回りながらさまよう精霊のことです。そんなものも、私にとっては感じ取れます。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

How she's able to dance and play is a real wonder she's often asked,  

エリン・フェフラウ 

踊りながら、楽器もきちんと弾く、一体どうやったらできるのか、彼女は良くその質問を受けています。 

 

MN 

“How do you not get your hair caught in the strings?” And, “Yes, it does get caught sometimes.” But you know, and I think for me again, movement is an extension of the music. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

「髪の毛が弦に絡まないんですか?」なんて訊かれます。「絡むこともありますよ」て答えてます。同じことを言うようですが、私が舞台上で体を動かすのは、自分の中にある音楽を表現しようとして、それが外に膨らみ出ている、その結果だと考えています。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Mairead has played at the White House and entertained for presidents. Her parents, both music educators, instilled a love of music and their children.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

これまでマーレイドさんは、ホワイトハウスで、4人の大統領の前で演奏しています。両親は二人共音楽の先生で、音楽を愛する気持ち、そしてご両親の子供達を愛する気持ちを、注いできました。 

 

MN 

We grew up breathing music really.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

私達にとって音楽は、空気みたいに、呼吸しながら育ってきたものです。 

 

EF 

Both she and her sister were named All Ireland fiddle champions at a young age.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

一家には二人の娘が居て、二人共アイルランドでは、フィドルの大会で全国優勝を幼い頃に果たしています。 

 

MN 

Playing music with them all the time was just the most fantastic upbringing, really. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

家族とずっと、四六時中音楽をとにかくしている、これって本当に素晴ららしい大人への成長の仕方だと思いましたね。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Her family, which has recorded an albumtogether in the Irish cottage where she grew up, is filled with accomplished musicians.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

家族総出で、アイルランドの伝統的なコテージを録音場所にして、レコードアルバムを1枚出しています。こちらの家族は全員が、ひとかどのミュージシャン達なのです。 

 

MN 

It's a great resource for me, actually. “Can you play with me in something?” such thing. “Can you arrange this for me?” “Can you do this for me?” 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

家族が、自分の音楽活動に役に立ってくれるなんて、本当に素晴らしいと思っています。「チョッと一緒に弾いてくれないかな?」とか「これ譜面起こしてくれないかな」とか「これチョッとやってくれないかな?」とか。 

 

EF 

Mairead has even appeared on the Great White Way. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

彼女はブロードウェイにも進出を果たしています。 

 

(interview) 

 

EF 

You're on Broadway.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

今やブロードウェイのアーティストですからね。 

 

MN 

Yes. Broadway was such ... it was such an experience, really, really fantastic. I was on Broadway with a spectacular rock show called “Rock Topia.”  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

そうなんです。ブロードウェイって、その…もう本当に、物凄い素晴らしい経験をさせていただきました。「ロック・トピア」という、すごいロック音楽のステージに出させていただいたんです。 

 

And it's easily the hardest thing I had to play. That's the first thing I'll say. But Broadway itself for nine weeks was 

absolutely incredible. 

当然今までで、一番キツい本番でしたよ。初めて、といってもいいことでしたから。でも、ブロードウェイで過ごした2ヶ月チョットは、何から何までスゴかったです。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

Throughout the years she's collaborated with some well-known musicians. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

これまでの演奏活動で、著名なミュージシャン達とのコラボレーションも行ってきています。 

 

MN 

Van Morrison, Sinead O'Connor, then over here in the States, I've played with a lot of musicians here like Pat Monahan of “Train,” and even Dee Snider who's Twisted Sister. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ヴァン・モリソンにシネード・オコナー、アメリカに来てからは「トレイン」のパット・モナハンと、それから「トゥイステッド・シスター」のディー・スナイダーとも! 

 

[Music] 

 

MN 

This particular violin is over 300 years old, actually 314 years old.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

例えばこのバイオリンなんかだと、300年くらい前のものです。正確には314年前のものですね。 

 

EF (interview) 

Are you serious?! 

エリン・フェフラウ 

マジですか? 

 

MN 

Yes. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

そうよ。 

 

EF (interview) 

As a kid? For pocket money? 

エリン・フェフラウ 

それをまだ小さい頃に、お小遣いで買ったという? 

 

EN 

I used to warm up fiddles for this violin dealer, and I'd have to give it back after two months after, after, you know, opening up the sound.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

このバイオリンを管理していたディーラーさんから、楽器を預かって、音が劣化しないように弾く、そういうことを、私はやっていたんです。2ヶ月位それをしたあとで、音がしっかり通るようになったんですね。 

 

And he said, “Keep this. You can keep it.” So I've had this since I was 14. 

そうしたらディーラーさんから「それ、君が使っていいよ」て言ってくれたんです。ですから14歳の時から、この楽器です。 

 

EF 

Now Mairead has her own line of violins and bows.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

現在マーレイドさんは、ご自身のブランドの楽器と弓をお持ちです。 

 

MN 

I've always wanted my name in a bow. Erin, you know, I'll have to bring you one.  

マーレイド・ネスビット 

ずっと自分の名前が入った弓を使いたかったんですよ。そうしたらエリンさんのも、今度持ってきますよ。 

 

EF (interview) 

Now, I need to .. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

いやあ、そうしたら… 

 

MN 

I go through. I need your address. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

本当よ。送り先住所教えてね。 

 

EF (interview) 

I need a lesson. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

そしたらレッスンしてもらわないと。 

 

MN 

Well, I do! You do! Well, I'll do start the lesson as well! 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

勿論、やりますよ、よろしくね!レッスンもついでに始めようね! 

 

EF (interview) 

Yes, absolutely! 

エリン・フェフラウ 

当然、よろしくね! 

 

**** 

 

EF (interview) 

Playing professionally since she was a wee lass, Mairead has not only mastered the traditional jigs and reels, but she's also an accomplished classical musician. 

エリン・フェフラウ 

「可愛いお嬢ちゃん」なんて言われていたころから、プロとして活動してきたマーレイドさんですが、名人級の腕前は、アイルランドの伝統的な「ジグ」や「リール」ばかりでなく、クラシック音楽も完璧です。 

 

[Music] 

 

EF 

This talent from the Emerald Isle, bringing the songs of her homeland to her new neighbors here in the Granite State.  

エリン・フェフラウ 

「緑滴るエメラルドの島」アイルランドの逸材は、「花崗岩がゴロゴロする人里」ニュー・ハンプシャーに、故郷アイルランドの数々の音楽をもたらそうとしています。 

 

MN 

And I think with Irish music the world over, it doesn't really matter what background you're from. It doesn't matter what genre you're in. Everybody loves a beautiful Irish melody. Everybody does. And they don't know why they love. They just do. 

マーレイド・ネスビット 

アイルランドの伝統的な音楽は、世界中で聴いていただいても、聞く方がどんなバックグラウンドをお持ちでも、楽しんでいただけると思っています。ご自分がどんなジャンル音楽がお好きでも、楽しんでいただけると思っています。アイルランド音楽のメロディの美しさは、どんな方にも好きになってもらえると思っています。その理由を実感することはないにせよ、とにかく好きになってもらえると思っています。 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0ZNXxPP10I 

 

Celtic Woman - Danny Boy (Live At Morris Performing Arts Center, South Bend, IN /2013) 

英日対訳:カーチュン・ウォン(新加坡・指揮)2020演奏会前説:ゴメンな、ショスタコーヴィッチ!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT5tly4U1lQ 

スクリプトの動画はこちらからどうぞ 

 

(Pre-Concert Talk) 

The internationally acclaimed Kahchun Wong, talks about the 20th century Russian master's remarkable Chamber Symphony. 

2020/09/25 

黃佳俊 

世界を舞台に活躍中のカーチュンウォンが、20世紀ロシアを代表する作曲家ドミトリー・ショスタコーヴィッチの「室内交響曲について、オンラインコンサートに向けてのプレトークで語ります。 

 

You can hear it really in the music, you know, it's ... I mean, a lot of people, reports are saying it's autobiographical.  

曲を聞くとおわかりいただけると思いますが…多くの人、記録なんかにもありますように、この曲は、作曲者自身の人生を描いている、ということです。 

 

A lot of people are linking it to the fact that he wrote it in three days - 1960, which is also the year he joined the Communist Party.  

作曲者はこの曲を3日間で書き上げました。1960年のことです。この年は共産党入党の年でもあります。このことと関係がある、そう思う人も多いかと思います。 

 

And he wrote his String Quartet No. 8 which is the basis for this version by (Rudolf) Barshai, and Shostakovich himself has heard this music.  

ショスタコーヴィチ弦楽四重奏曲第8番を書いています。今回演奏するルドルフ・バルシャイの編曲版の元となった曲です。今回の編曲版は、ショスタコーヴィチ自身も聞いています。 

 

And he ... in some reports, it's suggested that he said “This was even better than the string quartet version.” 

ある文献によると作曲者はこう言ったとされていますこれは弦楽四重奏曲バージョンよりも良かったぞ。」 

 

Today on stage we have 4 first violins, 4 second, 4 violas, 3 cellos, 2 basses. So it's a very reduced string orchestra.  

日舞台上には第1バイオリンが4人第2バイオリン4人ビオラ4人チェロが3人コントラバス2人ですまあ、弦楽オーケストラ、と呼ぶには規模は小さめにしてあります 

 

It's also not the kind of Singapore Symphony that audiences are usually used to because we have usually 14 first violin to 16 first violins.  

普段お客様方おなじみのシンガポール交響楽団とは、ちょっと違った感じですね。普段は第1バイオリンが14人とか16人とかいますから。 

 

But at the same time I think with the context of this music, that it has been so powerful with just four in its original quartet version.  

ですが同時にですね、今回第1バイオリンが4人しかいませんが、この音楽の作り方を考えると、大本の弦楽四重奏曲版の持つ力強さが出ています。 

 

Now that we have a slightly enlarged string orchestra, I think we still keep very much this musical continuity and the context of this piece itself. 

弦楽四重奏よりは少しだけ規模を大きくした、そんな感じの今回の弦楽オーケストラですが、この曲の持つ音楽性は受け継がれていますし、曲の作り方も受け継がれています。 

 

It's a very strange piece. I was very intrigued by it. The first time I heard it was a recording by the Borodin Quartet, and it has so much, musically, that's painful, melancholic, but at the same time it's also very calculated.  

この曲は、本当に一風変わった作品です。とても興味深いな、僕はそう思いました。初めてこの曲を聞いたのは、ボロディン弦楽四重奏団の音源です。この音源の演奏は、音楽的にとても豊かです。痛々しくて、物憂げで、でも同時に、ものすごく計算されていることがわかります。 

 

You know, it's really a kind of contrast between the free and also the restrained.  

ある意味、自由気ままさと、すごい堅苦しさと、そのコントラストがハッキリしています。 

 

*********** 

 

It begins in the first movement, (there are) five of them, in the first movement almost a kind of quasi-fuga. You have these canonic entrances, not very regular, singing his name "Re-Mi-Do-Si" which is D-Es-C-H. "Es" for E-flat and “H” for B-natural, and so they play Re-Mi (E-flat)-Do-Si B-natural, which is sort of "DSCH", his signature, his name - "Dmitri Schostakowitsch." 

第1楽章、この曲は5つの楽章があって、最初の楽章は、フーガっぽいものです。輪唱、カノンのような出だしで、そんなに規則性がハッキリしているものではありません。作曲者の名前を歌っているんですよ。「レ、ミ、ド、シ」これって、ドイツ語では「D(デー)Es(エス)C(ツェー)H(ハー)」といいます。「エス」とは「ミ」のフラット、「ハー」とは「シ」のナチュラル。「DSCH」と並んだ感じで、作曲者の名前「Dドミトリー・SショスタコーヴィチCH」となるでしょ? 

 

And everyone is murmuring the name from the cellos, basses to violas, second violins, first violins, and then everyone whispers it very pianissimo, senza vibrato.  

舞台にいる一人一人の奏者が、彼の名前をブツブツと呟くんですよ。まずはチェロ、コントラバス、そしてビオラ、第2バイオリン、第1バイオリンと続きます。それぞれがうんと小さな音、pp(ピアニッシモ)で、ヴィブラートはかけません。 

 

So you can feel this very tense, very unsettling atmosphere. Here with the SSO (Singapore Symphony Orchestra), we've tried to do this in three different ways.  

そうやって、この物凄く張り詰めた、落ち着かない雰囲気を作るのです。今回シンガポール交響楽団では、これを3つの異なる方法でやってみました。 

 

It's the music (which is) absolutely the same - pianissimo. But the first time we played on the A-string, senza vibrato, so a very brittle sound, and then the second time we move it to D-string and so it's a little bit higher positioned but con vibrato but still pianissimo.  

音楽はそのまま、pp(ピアニッシモ)です。ですが1回目は「A」の弦を使うのです。ヴィブラートはかけません。ドライで、ちょっとのはずみで崩れてしまいそうな音になります。2回目は「D」の弦を使います。少しだけ高い位置になりますが、今度はヴィブラートをかけて、でも音量はpp(ピアニッシモ)のままです。 

 

So now you hear this darker sounds but with a more weeping, sad singing, mournful kind of music.  

そうやって音色が濃い目で、更に涙をにじませるような、悲しげに歌うような、うめくような感じの音楽になります。 

 

And then the third time. When it appears, it starts with an E-natural so we play it on the E-string, which in most cases, violinists don't really like to play on open string in a kind of music like this because it's so bright and out of place.  

そして3回目です。今度は出だしがEナチュラルですので「E」の弦を使います。多くの場合、バイオリン奏者は開放弦を使って、この手の音楽を弾くのは、あまり好みません。なぜなら「開けっぴろげ」みたいな明るさを音が持ってしまって、物凄く場違いな感じになってしまうからです。 

 

But in this circumstance, I just thought it works very well and the SSO violinists are so cooperative in exploring this idea, so I think we're going to get a very nice result out of that.  

でも今回この場合に限って、この方がうまくいくと、僕は考えました。シンガポール交響楽団のバイオリン奏者の皆さんが、すごく協力してくれて、どうやったら僕のアイデアを実現できるか、模索してくれたんです。素晴らしい結果になると思っています。 

 

And of course this piece has a lot of solos. You have in the first movement, Yoong-Han playing a very beautiful entrance just a whisper. 

そうそう、この曲にはソロが沢山出てきます。第1楽章ではユン・ハンさんが、曲の出だしで、ものすごく美しい、丁度人間がささやくような演奏を聞かせてくれます。 

 

In a whole the first movement is like a prelude, fuga, canonic, calculated but also scary.  

第1楽章全体をもう一度おさらいしますと、前奏があって、フーガが続いて、カノンと、計算されつくされて、でも同時に怖い感じもします。 

 

******** 

 

And then it leads into the second movement which is a very fast, relentless, powerful [sings] very chromatic. Every part shines, you know, the violas play very important music, the second violins, and the cellos. 

このことは第2楽章にも引き継がれます。今度はものすごくスピード感があって、矢継ぎ早で、力強くて(歌ってみせる)、半音階でも聴いているかのような感じを強くうけます。どのパートもピカピカと光を放っているようです。ビオラがとても重要な部分を弾きます。あと、第2バイオリンとチェロもね。 

 

It starts as 8-bar phrases and then it goes into 4+3+2. Then he comes back with these bunches but it's seven bars long. So just thinking about this makes me very alert.  

出だしは8小節一区切りのフレーズ、次に4,3,2小節という区切り方のフレーズになります。そしてまたこのフレーズの区切り方に戻るのですが、小節数は7つになります。こうなると、僕も落ち着かない気分になります。 

 

I feel like I'm back to JC (Junior College) and studying all my A-Mathe (Additional Mathematics) and all that. It's very calculative, really makes me think about structure and phrases.  

なんだか中学校の時の「数学追補」という科目をやっていたときのことを思い出しますよ。曲が数学の計算でもやっているような気分になります。全体の構造や各フレーズのことを、ウンと考えさせられる曲です。 

 

And when I sort of try to understand this a little bit more, it really puts into context the kind of academic rigour that Shostakovich has placed into his music. It's nothing comfortable. It throws people off.  

なんでかな?と少しでも理解しようと思ったら、ある意味、難しい学問的な厳しさを、ショスタコーヴィチは自分の音楽に反映させたんだ、というそういう作り方だと判ったんです。心地よさなんて、全然ありません。人を突き放す、そんな感じです。 

 

And I think Shostakovich has been quoted to say that “This kind of Jewish dance music, folk music means a lot to him,” or “meant a lot.”  

たしかショスタコーヴィチが言った言葉だと思うんですが「この手のユダヤの舞曲だの、民族音楽だのというものは、私にとって大いに意味がある」、あれ?、「あった」だったかな。 

 

It really evoked some kind of emotion in him because it sounds, on the surface, very happy but it's full of despair and maybe this reflects the kind of history the Jews have all these thousands of years.  

作曲者の心のなかにある、何かしらの思いが、ものすごく出ています。というのも、表面的には、とても楽しげですよね。でも絶望感が満載で、これは数千年にも亘るユダヤ人の歴史みたいなものを、映し出しているんじゃないでしょうかね。 

 

And that's how he ends his second movement with this molto perpetuo, this constant drive with this dance.  

第2楽章は「Molto Perpetuo」、つまり、この踊りの音楽が、ずっと続くような感じで締めくくられます。 

 

*********** 

 

Then we move on to the third movement, which is one of my favourite Shostakovich little pieces, you know,  because it's a waltz and he does this kind of dances very well. You have also the second movement of the Fifth Symphony as well [sings] 

次は第3楽章です。僕の大好きな、ショスタコーヴィチの小さめの曲の中の一つなんです。これはワルツで、作曲者はこの手の踊りの音楽を、とても上手に使います。僕が好きな理由はそこにあります。これは交響曲第5番の第2楽章にも出てきます(歌ってみせる)。 

 

These kind of things are very sarcastic, very painful. It's almost like laughing at himself and being self-critical. It's kind of like limping with the waltz, you know, we're dancing.  

この手の音楽は、白々しさと、痛々しさで満ち溢れています。作曲者が自分自身を、あざ笑っているような感じです。ワルツに合わせて、ヨタヨタして、そんな感じで踊っているのです。 

 

So we feel like we have a dance partner and we're moving along and suddenly the dance partner just throws you aside or steps on your foot. You have this uneasiness with this Shostakovich. 

一緒に踊る相手が居て、踊っている途中で、いきなり突き放されて、しかも足まで踏まれて、そんな感じがします。ショスタコーヴィチの書いたこの部分には、安心感がまるで無い、そんな雰囲気があるのです。 

 

And then it goes into something very special, which is the First Cello Concerto, theme of the Cello Concerto [sings], which was also written very close to 1960, close to when this piece was first composed.  

次に、ここは特別な部分です。チェロ協奏曲第1番の主題を彷彿とさせる部分です。チェロ協奏曲第1番も、1960年頃に書かれた曲です。今回の曲の原曲が作られた頃ですね。 

 

There is a very big cello solo, very Shostakovich kind of melody. You have ... It's diatonic but very chromatic and sometimes he uses the flat second, the flat sixth and all that. Very Shostakovich kind of construction.  

第3楽章にはチェロの長いソロが出てきます。ショスタコーヴィチ特有の感じがするメロディです。譜面は全音階なのに、まるで半音階でも聴いているかのような感じが強くします。それは第2音を時々半音下げているからです。あと第6音も。まさにショスタコーヴィチの曲の作り方、というやつです。 

 

************ 

 

Then you have the fourth movement which is the most powerful thing. The climax of this piece. 

次に第4楽章です。この曲で一番パワフルな部分で、曲が最高潮に盛り上がるところです。 

 

So we have five movements, it just happens at the fourth movement again. This whole golden ratio around the 66 - 70% kind of thing.  

全部で5つの楽章ですが、普通の交響曲と同じように、第4楽章が山場になるんですね。この黄金比といいますか、6割6分から7割、といったところでしょうか。 

 

And it's very powerful because it's not loud, it's not fast, it's not kind of triumphant like how we think, “OK, the climax should be in the finale.” 

パワフルに感じるのは、音量がバカでかくなく、せかせか急ぐでなく、勝ち誇った感じでもない、「ヨッシャ、曲の山場なんだから、ここでおしまいだ!」でもない、だからこそパワフルに感じるのです。 

 

But he does give us something loud - its this effect of [knocks] 

ただ、バカでかい要素が一つあります。これ(譜面台をゲンコツで叩く) 

 

You know, someone like the KGB or some loan shark, or just someone at the door just knocking.  

ロシアの秘密警察KGBか、それともヤミ金融の取り立てか、とにかく誰かがドアをガンガン叩く、そんな感じのフレーズです。 

 

And the tempo is quite fast, It's 138. So it should be [sings].  I just thought especially with a smaller string section, getting a slower tempo gives slightly more time to make that sound and also to make it more threatening so we're trying to do it slightly slower. Sorry Shostakovich! But I think it gets that feeling out.  

テンポはとにかく速い、138です。こんな感じで(歌ってみせる)。ただ僕は、作曲者の指定よりも、楽器群の規模を縮小して、テンポもちょっとだけ遅めにして、時間を掛けて弾いた方が、強迫観念が強まるかな、と思って、ちょっとだけ遅めにやりました。ゴメンな、ショスタコーヴィチさん!でもこの方が、曲の感じが出ていると思いますよ。 

 

So you have this two contrasts in this movement, right? It starts with this knocking, it's a 3-bar phrase. And then you have [sings] and then 3-bar phrase. But it's singing. It's not short.  

ということで、この楽章では2つの対比が付きましたね。ドアをガンガン叩くような、これは3小節一区切りのフレーズです。次にこのフレーズ(歌ってみせる)これも3小節一区切りの、でもしっかり歌い上げる、短いフレーズではないからです。 

 

So [sings] is short but then [sings] is very long, very horizontal and full of vibrato, a really wide vibrato that we are asking the musicians to play, together.  

これは短く(歌ってみせる)、これは長く(歌ってみせる)、横の流れを大事にして、ヴィブラートも思いっきり、豪快に掛けて、奏者全員で一体感を出して、とお願いしています。 

 

So you have this crying and weeping part and then you have this guy at the door saying, "Come out - it's your time". 

この大声を張り上げるような、涙をにじませるような、そんな部分になっていて、これって作曲者が、例えばドアの向こうで「ほら、来いよ、お前が出てくる時なんだぞ」と言っているようです。 

 

Then the cello plays this very brittle, transparent, translucent kind of music.  

続いてチェロが、触ったら崩れそうな、透明感のある、それに近い感じの演奏をします。 

 

You have the feeling that it's an “íng hún chū qiào.”  There's just one wisp of smoke going up into the air and you're looking down on people. There's really this kind of spooky effect. And it's the Seventh Month! 

幽体離脱」、そんな雰囲気があるのです。細い煙のすじが、上に上がっていって、人々を上から見下ろす、薄気味悪い感じが出る効果があります。そう言えば今は「盂蘭盆会」の時期でしたね!幽霊もでますわ! 

 

************ 

 

Then it goes into the fifth movement. But this is almost, you know, if the beginning, if the first movement is like an opening or preface, this is like the prologue, then this is like the epilogue, the ending of it all.  

そして第5楽章へと進みます。ただここはですね、第1楽章を、「オープニング」とか「前書き」とか言って、「前説」とするなら、この第5楽章は「エピローグ」、つまり曲全体の「後書き」ですね。 

 

What is really special is that at the very end, we decided to have ... at a certain spot near the end, just the four quartet musicians playing. The principal players of the SSO are playing. That really goes back to the original quartet version.... D-S-C-H... 

今回特別に、曲の最後の最後の部分で、私達はですね…ある部分で、終わりのところですが、弦楽四重奏団みたいに、4人だけで演奏しています。シンガポール交響楽団の首席奏者の4人です。まさしく、大本の弦楽四重奏曲版ですね。メロディも「DSCH」と並んだ感じが、また出てきます。 

 

We get this very intimate kind of sound, almost like autobiographical and just dying down before the whole orchestra comes back for one final "re -mi-do-si" 

この間近で一対一で聴いているような感じのサウンドは、作曲者の人生を綴ったような、少しずつ消え去ってゆくような、そしてオーケストラ全体が、また「DSCH」と並んだ感じのフレーズを、今度こそ最後に弾きます。 

 

So you hear this perfect fifth at the very end. And this perfect fifth is also a kind of idea which you can find everywhere in this work. It's very empty. 

一番最後に完全5度の音が聞こえてきます。この完全5度を使うやり方は、この曲の色々なところに出てきます。音の密度が薄く、空っぽな感じがします。 

 

The perfect fifth is so resonant. You know, “Do-So.” It's such a common interval. Very resonant, but at the same time empty. 

この完全5度というのは、ものすごく良く響く組み合わせです。「ド・ソ」。よく知られている音の重ね方ですよね。ものすごく良く響きます。同時に、空っぽな感じがします。 

 

You know, you hear ... if you think about the harmonic series, you have “Do,” if it's C, “Do-Do.” And even “So.” 

倍音を並べてみましょう。「ド」、なら「ド-ド」となりますし、あるいは「ソ」でもいいですけど。 

 

But from this, the human ear interprets this as a major. We almost hear the third, the major third.  

ただこのことから、人間の耳というのは、こんな風に音を重ねると、長調の和音を鳴らしているように聞こえます。うまくすれば、第3音、長調の和音の第3音が聞こえてきます。 

 

But in Shostakovich's case, he doesn't put in a minor third so he doesn't say this is a minor chord.  

ところがショスタコーヴィチは、この曲では短調の第3音を譜面には書いていないのです。「これは短調の和音だ」とは、言っていないのです。 

 

But because he removes it, and because in the context of the whole music, you hear this and you hear the fifth as such a sad, painful, empty kind of a dyad, a kind of chord if you will. You can hear almost the minor third there. It's really quite a remarkable thing. 

作曲者は第3音を敢えて取り除いて、それは曲全体の作り方からですね、そうすることで、聞こえてくるんですよ、第5音が、悲しげで、痛々しくて、空っぽな感じがします。2つの音で構成される和音、ある意味和音ですよね、これも。短調の第3音が聞こえてくる感じがするんですよ。これは、本当にスゴイことです。 

 

********* 

 

Hello! My name is Kahchun. Nice to see you all again. I'm hoping to welcome you to our concert which is going to be on SISTIC Live and it features three pieces of music. 

こんにちは、カーチュンと申します!皆さん、またお目にかかれましたね!僕達シンガポール交響楽団は、「SISTC Live」のオンラインコンサートを開催いたします。是非御覧ください。今回は3曲演奏します。 

 

Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, which has SSO Principal Flute Jin Ta on flute solo.  

ドビュッシー作曲の「牧神の午後への前奏曲」。シンガポール交響楽団の我らが主席フルート奏者、ジン・タがソロを務めます。 

 

There's also Wagner's “Siegfried Idyll” in its original version for 13 instruments.  

次にワーグナー作曲「ジークフリート牧歌」。原曲の13人の奏者でお送りいたします。 

 

And also Shostakovich's Chamber Symphony, which is actually a version by Barshai on his original Eighth String Quartet. 

そして勿論、ショスタコーヴィチ作曲「室内交響曲」。原曲は弦楽四重奏曲ですが、今回はルドルフ・バルシャイの弦楽オーケストラ版でお送りいたします。 

 

So see you! 

待ってますよ! 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4OnE9uXHvY 

 

本番の見事な演奏です 

 

DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH (1906–1975) 

Chamber Symphony, Op. 110a (String Quartet No. 8, arr. Barshai, 1960) 

 

0:00 I. Largo 

5:29 II. Allegro molto 

8:45 III. Allegretto 

13:40 IV. Largo 

19:20 V. Largo 

 

Singapore Symphony Orchestra 

Kahchun Wong, conductor 

 

Recorded on 24 Aug 2020 at the Esplanade Concert Hall, Singapore