【英日対訳】ミュージシャン達の言葉what's in their mind

ミュージシャン達の言葉、書いたものを英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー (11) 2005年8月 (2/2)

August 2005  

Out of Thin Air  

Keith Jarrett reinvents his approach to the piano, and looks to do the same for his reputation   

By Dan Ouellette  

 

2005年8月 

どこからともなく/何も無いところから/何の根拠もなく/何の警告もなく 

キース・ジャレット ピアノへの自らのアプローチを再構築の上 

これまで通りの実力発揮を期する 

ダン・ウォーレット 

 

(後半 

 

 

 

From the sacred to the profane:

the matter of the coughs. Anyone who attends a Jarrett show, solo or with his Standards Trio, knows full well to stifle or muffle any coughing to ward off a potential wrath-of-Keith moment. But on Radiance, a few coughs in all their humanness survived the mix. Initially ECM chief Manfred Eicher requested the coughs be excised; upon hearing the mix, Jarrett disagreed.   

聖なるものから俗なるものまで:

咳の問題ジャレットのコンサートに行ったことのある者ならよく知っているだろうが、ソロだろうとスタンダーズ・トリオだろうと、キースの潜在的な怒りの瞬間から逃れるために、咳払いはぐっと堪えねばならない。だが『Radiance』では、人間なら当たり前につきものな咳払いが、いくつか消されずに残っている。当初ECMの代表マンフレート・アイヒャーは咳払いを消すように求めたが、ジャレットはミックスを聴いた結果、それに同意しなかったのだ。 

 

“I’m the one who demanded the coughs back,” he says with a laugh, as if to say, can you believe it? “To get his mix Manfred had to close down some of the mikes in the house. I listened to what he did and it didn’t sound right. During those shows the coughs had been cues to what I did next. For example, there’s one cough that determined where the end of a piece should be. I was playing very softly and I could have gone on, but that cough told me it’s about ready to resolve. So, it was like getting messages from the audience.”   

「咳払いの音を残すよう要求したのは、他ならぬ僕なんだよ。」彼は “信じられるかい?” と言わんばかりに笑ってこう言った。「マンフレートのミックスだと(咳を消すために)ホールのマイクをいくつか閉じなければならなかった。彼がやったのを聴いてみて、これは違うと思ってね。あの日のコンサートでの咳払いは僕にとって、次に何をするかの合図になってたんだ。例えばある咳払いは、曲の終わりを適切に決めるきっかけになった。その時はとても穏やかに演奏をしていて、そのまま続けることもできたんだけど、その咳払いが “そろそろ終わりだよ” と教えてくれた。つまり観客からメッセージを受け取ったようなものだ。」 

 

Jarrett says that he told trio bandmate bassist Gary Peacock about this part of his “epic saga of working on the live mix.” And Peacock said, “I thought you didn’t like coughs in the mix.” Jarrett said, “You’re right, but it was weird. When they were gone, I wanted them back.”   

ジャレットはこの “ミックスにまつわる壮大な物語” をトリオのベーシスト、ゲイリー・ピーコックに話したそうだ。 

ピーコック:「きみは録音に咳払いが入るなんて嫌なんじゃないのか?」 

ジャレット:「そうさ。でも不思議なんだ。全部消して無くなってしまったら、戻してほしくなったんだよ。」 

 

Peacock’s response: “Keith, you’re even more Zen than I am.”   

Jarrett laughs.   

ピーコック:「キース、きみは俺なんかよりも禅の心があるよ。」 

ジャレットは笑った。  

 

So, on the record, is Jarrett now encouraging his audience to give auditory cues?   

ということは、今では作品で発表することを前提として、ジャレットは聴覚的なきっかけを観客に促しているというのだろうか?  

 

“No, good point. I don’t need voluntary coughing. Besides, I can tell the difference.”   

「いや、そういうわけじゃないが、それはいい指摘だ。(僕にきっかけを与えようと)自主的にやる咳払いなんて必要ないよ。それに僕は(咳払いがわざとなのか、仕方なく出てしまったものなのか)違いが分かるんだ。」 

 

Was he also surprised by the lack of applause between pieces?  曲の間で拍手が起きなかったことにも驚いたのだろうか。 

 

“No, when that happened, I gave a little silent thank you. I was glad that the audience was uneasy. They expressed it by not applauding. They didn’t know when to clap and that was so great. That was special. I knew the Japanese audience would give me a chance to try something different. Even though they weren’t sure if they should clap, they were content to just sit there. That was wonderful to me because that’s what I was experiencing at home in my studio. When I stopped, there was just a pause to let the next [musical] thing occur to me.   

「いや、あの時はすこし無言でお礼を言ったよ。観客が不安そうにしているのが嬉しかったのでね。彼らが拍手をしないことにそれが表れていた。いつ拍手をすればいいのか分からなかったんだ。それはとても素晴らしいことだよ。あの時は特別だった。日本の観客なら、僕が何か違うことをやるチャンスをくれると思っていた。彼らは拍手をすべきかどうか分からなくても、ただそこに座って演奏を聴くことだけで満足してくれる。僕にとっては本当に素晴らしいことだった。それは僕が自宅のスタジオで体験していた事と同じだからね。演奏をやめて立ち止まると、そこにはちょうど次の(音楽的な)ことを思い浮かべるための間があったわけだ。」 

 

In an interview a few years ago, Jarrett said he used to believe that his solo shouldn’t last, but self-destruct by a certain date. The old Keith would disappear, not to be confused with the new. Does he feel the same way about Radiance?   

数年前のインタビューでジャレットは、ソロが長続きするはずもなく、いつか自壊する日が来るのだと信じていたと語っている。新しいキースと混同されることのないように、古いキースは消えるのだと。『Radiance』についても、そう感じているのだろうか。 

 

“No,” he says flatly. “This is my position paper on what I feel I can and cannot do at the keyboard. The whole language is intact. There’s an electricity because it was live. This album has something to do with my composition in a way that others did not. When you finish listening to it, it’s not like you’ve experienced a transient event. What’s happening here is closer to the coalescing of personal philosophy and music than a shot-in-the-dark concert. I can support this release more than any other that I can remember.”   

「いや、」彼はきっぱりと答えた。「この『Radiance』は、僕がピアノで出来ること、出来ないことを書いた声明書なんだ。僕の言葉がありのまますべてある。ライヴならではの刺激、緊張感がある。そして他のアルバムにはない方法で、僕の作曲に関わるものだ。聴き終えた時、それは(これまでのコンサートのような)一過性の出来事を経験したわけではないんだ。そこで起こっているのは行き当たりばったりのコンサートというよりも、僕個人の(音楽家としての)人生哲学と音楽とが融合したものに近い。このアルバムのリリースは、僕の記憶にある、過去のどの作品よりも支持できるものだ。」  

 

Plus, Jarrett adds, each listen reveals even more about the music he created out of thin air on those two evenings in Japan. “Usually, after going through the process of getting an album ready for release—certifying the sound, dealing with micro-volume differences—I might be tired of it already. With Radiance, my interest in what I was hearing went up every time I listened to it. This kept happening after I wrote the linear notes, otherwise I would have lightheartedly suggested that the music be listened to at least 26 times before making any judgments.”   

さらにジャレットは、この日本での2晩の公演で何もないところから創り出した音楽について、聴く度により多くのことがどんどん明らかになってゆくと付け加えた。「普通ならアルバムをリリースするために、音の確認や細かい音量の違いの調整なんて作業をやったあとはもう飽きたりするんだよ。でも『Radiance』に関しては、聴くたびに興味が増していった。これはライナーノーツを書いた後も続いたんだ。でなきゃ『この音楽にいろいろと判断を下す前に、最低でも26回は聴いてください。』なんて、軽口を叩いていただろう。」 

 

Jarrett’s bucolic western New Jersey home that he shares with his wife, Rose Ann, is closer to his Allentown, Pa., birthplace than to New York City, which is a 90-minute drive away. He’s lived here since 1971, has bought up surrounding land and takes refuge here in his house, office and studio, which is in a separate building. There’s a small brook that runs close to the house. He seems rested here and says his only trips to the big city are to go to the airport.   

現在ジャレットが妻のローズ・アンと暮らす、のどかなニュージャージー州西部に建つ家は、車で90分かかるニューヨークよりも生まれ故郷のペンシルベニア州アレンタウンのほうが近い。彼は1971年からそこに住み、周辺の土地を買い上げ、自宅とオフィス、そして別に建てられたスタジオでひっそりと籠るように暮らしている。家の近くには小川が流れ、彼はここで静養に努めているようで、大きな街へ出かけることがあってもそれは空港へ行くときだけだと言う。 

 

Upon arrival at his residence, Jarrett is sitting in his low-ceilinged kitchen eating a rice cracker with peanut butter and drinking sparkling water to wash down several vitamins he takes to keep his CFS at bay (later, during the interview, he swallows several toxin-cleansing charcoal pills, a part of his daily regimen against the bacterial parasite that nearly permanently sidelined him.)   

家に到着してみると、ジャレットは天井の低いキッチンに座り、ライスクラッカーにピーナッツバターをつけたものを食べ、CFS慢性疲労症候群)対策として数種類のビタミン錠剤を炭酸水で流し込んでいた。(このあとインタビュー中にも体内の毒素を浄化する活性炭の錠剤を数錠飲んでいた。彼を音楽活動の第一線から半永久的に退かせてしまっている細菌性寄生虫に対する日々の療養法のひとつだ。) 

 

A few minutes later, a chiropractor who lives nearby bicycles to the house, and Jarrett excuses himself for 15 minutes for some adjusting that helps with this shoulder pain. Two hours later, at the conclusion of our conversation, the chiropractor returns.   

数分後、近所に住むカイロプラクターが自転車でやってきて、ジャレットは15分ほど失礼する、と席を外し、肩の痛みを抑える矯正の施術かなにかを受けていたが、2時間後に私達のインタビューが終わる頃、そのカイロプラクターはまた戻って来ていた。 

 

Jarrett’s upstairs office is sound-system central, with hi-fi equipment strung together with thick black cables resting on Styrofoam cushions the size of wine-bottle corks. The ceiling is red-orange and has track lighting. His dark-wood desk is scattered with paper, as well as several model cars, including a red Ferrari and a gray Porsche 911 Carrera S. Underneath the desk is a box set of CDs, Sinatra—The Capitol Years.   

ジャレットの2階のオフィスはオーディオが中心だ。黒く太いケーブルで繋がれたハイファイ機器が、ワインボトルのコルクほどの大きさのスタイロフォーム(発泡ポリスチレン)クッションの上に置かれている。トラックライトが付けられた天井は赤っぽいオレンジ色で、ダークウッドの机には書類が散乱しているほか、赤いフェラーリやグレーのポルシェ911カレラSといった、車の模型もいくつか置かれている。そして机の下にはボックスセットのCD『Sinatra - The Capitol Years』があった。 

 

Jarrett settles into his desk chair. After being congratulated on his upcoming birthday, he smiles and says that this year promises to be full of significant events. “It wasn’t a master plan that I know of,” he says. “It just happened.”   

ジャレットはデスクチェアに腰を下ろした。もうすぐやって来る誕生日に祝意を伝えると彼は笑顔で、今年は重要なイベントでいっぱいになるだろう、と言った。「でも特に計画してたわけじゃなくて、ただそうなっただけなんだ。」 

 

While Radiance is his crowning moment, the CD is only the first project that will roll out between now and this fall. The double disc includes the Tokyo concert tracks, 30 minutes worth, because “that was part of the same concert in Osaka. After the first show I took a train to Tokyo, had a day off and the next thing I played were the four parts in Tokyo.”   

『Radiance』は彼のこれまでの最高到達点だが、このCDはこれから秋にかけて展開されるプロジェクトの第一弾に過ぎない。この2枚組CDには東京公演での演奏も30分ほど含まれているが、その理由はジャレットによれば「あれは大阪と同じコンサートの一部だからだ。初日の大阪公演を終えた後、列車で東京に移動して、1日休みを挟んで次の公演で演奏したのが東京での4つのパートなんだよ。」とのことだ。 

 

The full Tokyo concert (including an encore of standards) will be released by ECM as a DVD. And in support of the DVD release, Jarrett will perform his first solo concert in the United States in more than a decade, Sept. 26 at Carnegie Hall. This is his only North American solo show.   

東京公演の全編は(スタンダードナンバーのアンコールを含めて)ECMからDVDでリリースされる予定だが、それを記念して、ジャレットはじつに10年以上ぶりにアメリカでのソロ公演を9月26日、カーネギー・ホールで行う。これは彼の唯一の北米ソロ公演だ。 

(訳注:キースはこれまでも北米でソロ公演をやっているので、これはダン・ウーレットの勘違いか。それとも05.9.26カーネギー公演がこの時点で発表を前提とした計画であることを知っていたのか。だとすれば確かに、後に発表された『The Carnegie Hall Concert』は、唯一の北米ソロ作品ではある。) 

 

Also slated for the fourth quarter is Columbia/Legacy’s long-awaited six-CD box set Miles Davis—The Cellar Door Sessions 1970, which features Jarrett on electric keyboards. In the tape archives since the 1970 performance at the Washington, D.C., club, the box captures the trumpeter stretching further into the fusion zone in the company of Jarrett, saxophonist Gary Bartz, bassist Michael Henderson, drummer Jack DeJohnette, percussionist Airto Moreira and guitarist John McLaughlin (who’s heard on two of the six discs—the second and third sets of the Dec. 19, 1970, show). Some of the material was used in the LP Live/Evil, but this set features more than five hours of never-released music.   

また、この第4四半期に発売が予定されているのが、コロムビア/レガシーからの待望の6枚組CDボックスセット『Miles Davis: The Cellar Door Sessions 1970』だ。エレクトリック・キーボードのジャレットがフィーチャーされている。このボックスには1970年にワシントンD.C.にあるクラブで行われたマイルス・バンドのステージを収めたテープ・アーカイヴから、ジャレット、サックスのゲイリー・バーツ、ベースのマイケル・ヘンダーソン、ドラムのジャック・ディジョネット、パーカッションのアイアート・モレイラ、ギターのジョン・マクラフリン(6枚中2枚、70年12月19日のセカンド・セットとサード・セットのみ参加)と共に、マイルスがフュージョン音楽へと領域を拡大してゆく姿が捉えらえており、一部にはLP『Live / Evil』に素材として使用された箇所も含む、5時間以上に及ぶ未発表演奏を収録したものだ。 

 

If Jarrett’s Radiance is best sipped in the quiet of a listening room, then The Cellar Door is made for frenetic driving over the George Washington Bridge back into Manhattan, then down the Henry Hudson Parkway. It’s hot, fast, exhilarating and dangerous. Jarrett contributes to the set’s liners, writing, “You don’t usually see this kind of comet go by more than once or twice in a lifetime.”   

『Radiance』はリスニング・ルームで静かに、時間をかけて1曲1曲をじっくりと味わうのが最高だとするなら、『The Cellar Door Sessions 1970』は、ジョージ・ワシントン橋をぶっ飛ばしてマンハッタンへ入り、ヘンリー・ハドソン・パークウェイを下る熱狂的なドライブのために作られたものだ。その音楽は熱く、疾走し、刺激的でハイで、危険な何かがある。ジャレットはライナーノーツにこう寄稿している。「これは一生に1度か2度、見ることができるかどうか分からない彗星のようなものだ。」 

 

Jarrett is pleased with the release, especially since it’s the only recorded documentation of the group without McLaughlin. “I wouldn’t have written any liner notes if I didn’t like it,” he says and laughs, “even though the Fender Rhodes was off its game during that gig. I would not have played that gig without Miles, who knew I was only there temporarily, because I had my own thing.”   

特にこのアルバムはジョン・マクラフリンがいない、グループ本来の演奏を唯一記録したものであることから、ジャレットはこのリリースを喜んでいるのだ。「好きでもない作品のライナーノーツなんか書かないよ。」彼はそう言って笑った。「あのギグではフェンダー・ローズの調子が悪かったけどね。マイルスがいなければ、あのバンドで演奏なんてしなかっただろう。彼はわかってたんだ。僕は一時的にいるだけで、僕自身のやるべきことがあるってね。」  

 

Jarrett disagrees with Marcus Miller’s assessment of that period as Davis just wanting a funk band. “Then why was he still playing such wonderful scales that have nothing to do with funk?” Jarrett questions. “I believe Miles wanted us all because he knew we could get funky, but not go over the edge and become a funk band. He wanted the band to play exciting things, to surprise him. Sometimes he’d look at you and you’d think he was mad at you, but what he was doing was looking like, ‘Wow!’”   

ジャレットはマーカス・ミラーの「デイヴィスはファンクバンドをやってみたかっただけ」とする見方には同意しない。「もし彼が本当にそう思っていたなら、なぜファンクとは無縁の、あんなに素晴らしいスケールを吹き続けていたんだ?」とジャレットは問う。「マイルスが僕たち全員を呼んだのは、みんなその気になればファンキーにやれても、一線を越えてファンクバンドにはならないことを知っていたからだと僕は確信している。彼は自分を驚かせるために、バンドにエキサイティングなことを演奏するよう望んでいたんだ。演奏中にときどき、彼はこっちをじっと見るんだ。怒ってんのかな、と思ったら、実際は『ウォウ!!』みたいな感じなんだ。」 

 

Was that your last time playing electric keys?   

電子キーボードを弾いたのは、あの時が最後だったのですか? 

 

“Yeah.”   

「そうだ。」 

(訳注:正確には、キースが最後に電子楽器を弾いたのは72年10月、フレディ・ハバードCTI録音『Sky Dive』でのセッションだが、キース的には単なる「お付き合い参加」なのでマイルスバンドが最後、ということでも大した問題はない。)  

 

Do you own electric keyboards today?   

いま自分の電子キーボードは持っていますか?  

 

“No. Totally not. Not interested. I still don’t think they’re anything but toys. I can get toys in a toy shop. It’s hard enough getting the right audio system to represent a certain moment in music. Why bother getting an instrument to squeeze itself through wires and then pretend a volume control means something? I like the electric guitar, but applying the concept to keyboards sucks.”   

「いや、まったく。興味がないんだ。今でもあんなものはおもちゃでしかないと思うね。おもちゃはおもちゃ屋で買えるだろ?音楽のある瞬間を表現するために適切な音響システムを用意するのはじつに大変なことなんだ。それを何だってわざわざ楽器に電気コードなんか無理やり通して、ボリュームコントロールに何か意味があるように見せかけるんだ?僕はエレキギターは好きだけど、そのコンセプトをキーボードに当てはめるなんてのはまったく最悪だよ。」 

(訳注:おそらくキースは電子キーボードが半音階楽器であることの不自由性(ベンドノートで豊かな表情が付けられない)に加え、音が貧弱なのは言うまでもないが、タッチによるダイナミクスのコントロールもままならず(ローズはできるがピアノほど豊かではなく、オルガンはできなかった)、ダイナミクスはアンプによるボリュームコントロールで不自然につけなければならないことをバカバカしく思っているのだろうと思われる。キースがマイルスバンドで弾いていたローズやオルガンはピッチベンドできなかったし、まだ鍵盤にタッチセンサーも付いていなかった。もちろんキースは電気による人工的なベンドノートやダイナミクスなどバカげている、という人だが、マイルスバンドのキーボードにそうした機能があったら彼はそれをうまく使って、さらに素晴らしい演奏をしていただろう。キースはそこに洗濯板しかなかったら、それを駆使して音楽をやる人なのだ。さて、そんなキースが苦労した電子キーボードに比べて、エレキギターは構造上かなり自由度が高いので、キースも納得している。キースがただやみくもにエレクトリックを嫌ってるわけではないというのがよく分かる。キースが楽しそうにエレキギターを弾いている極私的作品『No End』をまだ聴いていない人はぜひ一聴をおすすめする。長くなったが最後にこれだけは言っておきたい。それでもキースの弾くローズはアメイジングの一言だ。) 

 

So, with a milestone album on his hands, what’s the future look like for Jarrett? He has no plans to expand the trio, nor to work with any other artists outside his comfort zone (“I haven’t heard consciousness coming through players in so long that I’m addicted to my own band”).   

さて、節目となるアルバムを手にしたジャレットの目に、未来はどう映っているのだろうか。彼にはトリオを拡大する計画もなければ、気心の知れたアーティスト以外と仕事をする予定もない。(「僕が自分のトリオにハマってるのと同じくらい、あまりにも長いこと自分のしっかりとした考えがその音楽から聴こえるプレイヤーを耳にしていない。」)  

 

While he says he wishes he heard something new among the players he’s listened to, Jarrett’s disappointed. “I can only listen to a couple of minutes of performances and I have to turn them off. Unfortunately it sounds like people don’t know what they’re doing.”   

ジャレットは、自分が耳を傾けるミュージシャン達から、何か目新しいものを聴いてみたいと願っているとは言いつつも、落胆しているという。「2、3分しか聴けずにスイッチを切っちゃうんだ。残念ながら、彼らは自分達のやっていることが解っていないように聴こえる。」 

 

So, what’s on the horizon personally?   

では、個人的にこれから目指すものは何ですか?  

 

“I don’t look ahead.”   

「僕は先を見ないんだ。」  

 

No plans?   

何の計画もないと? 

 

“No, never have, and if I did I would have probably missed out on things that did happen. If I had plans, even the sketchiest of blueprints, I could be stuck with the remnants of a bad idea, rather than waiting for these new things that come through the flux all by themselves. Those little nanoseconds. That’s what’s radiant. It’s like seeing people fishing in the stream and you can see the water glimmering.”   

「そう。計画なんて持ったこともない。そんなことをしたら、僕はおそらく実際に起こったことを見逃してしまっていただろうね。もし計画なんて持ってしまったら、それがどんなに大雑把なものでも、悪いアイデアの残骸に足元を取られて立往生してただろう。計画なんか立てずに、新しいことが勝手に流れてくるのを待っていればいいのに。それはほんのナノ秒(10億分の1秒)ほどの出来事だ。それこそが輝きなんだよ。小川で釣りをしている人を見ると、水がキラキラと輝いているだろう、ああいう感じだ。」 

 

Jarrett pauses and smiles. He says, “Maybe if I have a secret, that’s it: Don’t have plans.”  

ジャレットはちょっと間をおいて微笑み、そしてこう言った。「たぶん僕に秘密があるとしたら、そう。計画なんて持たないこと、だね。」 

 

 

 

DB   

 

62 

Ask Keith:   

Q. Based on your experience, what advice could you give to an aspiring artist?   

キースに訊く:ご自身の経験を踏まえて、これからアーティストを目指す人に向けてどんなアドバイスをしますか? 

 

I’ll negatively answer your question by way of an anecdote. I used to be—and still am—renowned for being pointedly honest to people backstage after concerts. My ex-wife used to get on my case. She’d say, “That’s not very nice.” So, one day, I decided to be a little nicer.   

それには僕のちょっとしたエピソードを交えて否定的に答えよう。僕は以前、いや今もそうだが、コンサートのあと、楽屋で人々と話すときにあからさまに正直なことで有名なんだ。それで前の妻によく怒られたんだよ。「あんな言い方ってないわ。」とね。だからある日、少し態度を良くしようと思ったんだ。 

 

I was playing on the West Coast and this guy came up to me. He had been playing the piano and guitar and decided to stop playing. So, as Mr. Nice Guy, I changed what I would have probably said, which was, “That’s OK if you don’t want to play anymore. Don’t do it.” But I didn’t say that. I said, “You should keep playing.”   

西海岸で演奏してたとき、ある男が僕に近づいてきた。彼はピアノとギターをやっていたんだが、もうやめようと決意していた。それで僕は、ミスター・ナイスガイとして(ここはいい人を演じようと)、本当の僕ならたぶん「もう演奏したくないならいいじゃん、やめろよ。」と言う代わりにこう言ったんだ。「きみは続けるべきだよ。」  

 

So, he went back home, started to play again, made an album, sent it to me and asked for my opinion. Well, I thought it was complete trash and totally derivative. He asked me to be honest, so I sent him an honest appraisal.   

それで彼は家に戻るとまた演奏を再開して、アルバム作って僕に送ってきたんだ。意見を聞きたいとね。いやあ、でもそれは完全なゴミで、ほとんど何かの猿真似だと思ったんだけど、彼は正直に言ってくれと。それで正直な評価を送ったんだ。 

 

First I was god, then I was the devil.   

つまりあれだ、最初は神様で、翻って悪魔ってやつだよ。 

 

Five or 10 years later, Gary Peacock, Jack DeJohnette and I were playing in Copenhagen. Before the show we were eating in this garden area outside the concert hall, and this guy comes up to our table. He said, “Mr. Jarrett, do you remember me?” And I said, “No, I’m sorry, I don’t.” And then he pulled my letter out of his pocket. And I said, “I remember the letter and now I remember you. And excuse me, but we have a concert to play.”  

それから5年だか10年だか経って、ゲイリー・ピーコックジャック・ディジョネット、それに僕はコペンハーゲンで演奏をしていた。本番前にホールの外にあるガーデンエリアで食事をしてたら、その彼が僕らのテーブルへやってきたんだ。「ジャレットさん、私を憶えてますか?」「いや、申し訳ありませんが、憶えていません。」すると彼は、ポケットから僕の送った手紙を取り出したんだ。それで僕はこう言ったよ。「その手紙は憶えています。あなたのことも思い出しました。ですが申し訳ありません、これから本番がありますので。」とね。 

 

Being positive and giving people advice has probably done more harm than good. The right thing I should have told him backstage was, “That’s fine. Stop playing.” Then the ball’s in the real court where it belongs. It tells a person to be responsible for themselves and not rely on someone else. The creative thing is to leave someone on their own.   

ポジティヴであること、そして人にアドバイスすることは、おそらく良いことより悪いことの方が多いんだ。あの日、楽屋で僕が彼に言うべきだった正しい言葉は「それでいい。もうやめるんだ。」だ。そうすれば、ボールは本来在るべきコートへと戻ってゆく。つまり、自分に責任を持て、他人に頼るな、ってことだよ。クリエイティヴとは、人をひとりで放っておくということだ。 

 

 

Schools cannot create innovation. Innovation and schools are almost diametrically opposed. A jazz player cannot study with jazz people because you become a part of who you study with. So, you can’t become yourself. No one will help you on that issue. If you’re improvising and it’s not coming from you, it’s not worth playing because it’s been played before, probably by the people who taught you.   

学校はイノヴェーションを生み出せない。イノヴェーションと学校はほぼ真逆の存在だ。ジャズプレイヤーは、ジャズピープルに教えを受けることはできない。そんなことをしたら、その教えを受けた人の一部分になってしまう。つまり自分自身になることができないんだ。この問題については、誰も助けてはくれない。インプロヴィゼーションをしていても、それが自分の中から出てきたものじゃないなら、演奏する価値はない。それはすでに誰かが演奏したもので、その誰かとはおそらく、教えを受けた人だからだ。 

 

And, as for the school of thought of emulating people to find your own voice, I don’t think so. All a pianist needs is a piano teacher to teach you how to use the instrument. After that, it’s nobody’s game but yours. —D.O.   

それから自分自身の声(自分固有のサウンドや演奏)を見つけるために、だれか他者の真似をするという考え方についても、僕はそうは思わない。ピアニストに必要なのは、楽器の使いかたを教えてくれるピアノの先生だけだ。その後は誰のものでもない、自分だけのゲームなんだよ。 

英日対訳:エヴェリン・グレニー:インタビュー「聴く、とは…」

エヴェリン・グレニー(Evelyn Glennie)世界屈指の打楽器奏者がゲスト出演した、TVインタビューショーを、私が聴き取ったものです。ブルーノ・マーズビル・ゲイツ、コフィ・アナン前国連事務総長も出演したSVT / NRK/ Skavlan です。検索してチェックしてみてください。 

 

"Listening is about looking at a person" - Evelyn Glennie | SVT/NRK/Skavlan - YouTube

 

エヴェリンがゲスト出演した時のインタビューコーナーのタイトルは 

 

「聴く、とは、相手を見つめること」 

Listening is about looking at a person. 

 

******************* 

 

Anchorperson:Please welcome, Evelyn Glennie. 

司会者:それではお呼びしましょう、エヴェリン・グレニーさんです。 

 

Man: Hi, Evelyn, good to see you. 

男性:やぁ、エヴェリン、ようこそ。 

 

A:Hei, Evelyn, welcome to the show. 

司会:エヴェリン、ようこそ。 

 

Evelyn Glennie: Thank you. Actually, it's Evelyn, not “EEVLIN” 

エヴェリン・グレニー:どうも。あの、私の名前は「エヴェリン」、「イヴリン」じゃないわ 

 

Victoria Silvstedt: Oh, is it? 

ヴィクトリア・シルブヴステッド:あら、そうなの? 

 

E: Yeah, it's Evelyn, yeah. 

エヴェリン:ええ、そうよ、エヴェリンなの。 

 

A: It's like, uh, Skandiavian pronunciation, sounds like. OK, I'm sorry. 

司会:なるほど、北欧語みたいな発音になってしまったね、すみません。 

 

E: No, not at all. 

エヴェリン:いえいえ、とんでもない。 

 

M: OK, Freddy. 

男性:大丈夫だ、フレディー。 

 

A: Tell me, you're gonna perform a little piece for us later. And I wonder, when I see this script, what's going on in your head? 

司会:さて、君には後ほど演奏を少し披露してもらうんだけれど、今日このスタジオを見て、今なにか思うことはある? 

 

E: Oh, my goodness me. That's impossible to say, because in every occasion it's so different. But ultimately it starts with listening.  

ええと、そう言われても、ちょっと難しいわ。だって状況によって違うから。でも、結局何にしても、まずは聴くことかしら。 

You know, this is kind of the machine, or the engine as it were. So you know, in every occasion it's different.  

まあ、要は機械やエンジンを扱うときと同じで、状況によって臨機応変にね。 

You're listening to the room you're in. You're listening to how you're feeling, you're listening to what you're wearing, the platform you're standing on, how the audience is configurated, you know, whether they're sitting on cushion seats, or carpets, or curtains, or whatever.  

自分がいる部屋の中をよく聴いて、自分の心の中をよく聴いて、自分の身につけているものとか、立っている場所とか、あとお客さんの座っている様子もね。クッションに座っているのかとか、床にはカーペットが敷いてあるのかとか、カーテンはどうか、とかだったりね。 

So you know, the instruments I play just happen to be the tools. It's almost like ingredients as you're cooking your meal. But ultimately, my job is to take those ingredients and to create a sound meal. But I have to start with listening, a pallette of listening.     

だからつまり、楽器っていうのは道具で、要は食事を用意する時の食材みたいなものね。結局私のやっていることって、どの楽器を使うか選んで、出てくる音を材料に料理を作ってゆくようなものなの。でも最初にしなきゃいけないことは聴くことね。何を聴くべきかをパレットの上に載せてゆくの。 

 

A: But you need to have a sense of rhythm as well. 

司会:リズム感も良くないといけないよね。 

 

E: Everybody does, everybody.  

そんなのは、一人一人それぞれ持っているものよ。 

 

A: Do we? 

司会:本当に? 

 

E: You and your profession does. A politician does. A jockey does. 

エヴェリン:あなたも持ってるし、あなたの同業の方もみんな持ってるわ。政治家だって、競馬の騎手だってね。 

We all have rhythm. We all begin life with rhythm. And actually, we all begin life as percussion players in the womb. 

リズム感はみんなが持ってるの。生まれたときにはリズム感が備わっているの。人間てみんな、お母さんのお腹の中にいるときには、みんなバーカッション奏者なのよ。 

You know, we're fighting away there, beating away there.  

そうでしょ、ね、お腹の中でもがいたり、蹴ったり叩いたりするじゃない。 

And when you look at the baby, or an infant, the flexibility they have within the WHOLE body. 

赤ちゃんだの、小さい子だのを見るとわかるじゃない、頭の天辺からつま先まで、子供って柔軟性のかたまりでしょ。 

You know, they can really sort of do things with the limbs. Every percussionist wants to have and cling on to it, really. So..... 

それで、子供って両手両足を使って何でもやろうとするじゃない。パーカッション奏者はみんな、この感覚を一生持ち続けていたいものなのよ。 

 

A: But the simultaneous... I feel, I feel, uh, I don't know about you, but I feel, uh, I can have a rhythm in a way.  

司会:でも同時に・・・こう、何ていうか、君はどうかわからないけれど、その、僕もリズム感は持てるってことなんだね。 

But when you do different things, different rhythms with different hands and feet, then it's beyond me. 

でも君の場合、両手両足を使って、色んなことを、色んなリズムをやってのける。となると、やっぱり僕には無理なんじゃないかな。 

 

E: Well, it is, it is. Just you decide to use the word “It's beyond me.” You know, it isn't. 

エヴェリン:いいえ、そんなことないわ。「僕には無理」って言ったけど、そんなことないわ。 

That's my profession. So I have to pay attention to every limb, and make sure that whatever the right hand does, the left hand can also do. Whatever the left leg does, the right leg can also do.  

私はこれを仕事にしているわけだから、つまり、意識して両手両足を使っているのよ。右手でやることは左手でもできるし、左足でやることは右足でもできるってことなの。 

You know, that's part of my profession. That's part of what I train to do. 

これは仕事の一部だし、日々自分を鍛え上げてゆくところなのよ。 

 

Goldie Hawn: Are you taking notes? 

ゴールディ・ホーン:ほら、忘れないようにメモ取りなさいよ。 

 

A: Yes. Well, I.... You used to be a dancer. I mean, you have rhythm. 

司会:あ、うん・・・君はダンサーだったろう、だから、リズム感はあるよね。 

 

G: Yeah, there's a lot of music in your body. And, uh, also in acting. Because in acting I hear the same.. 

ゴールディ:勿論よ、音楽っていうのはみんなの体の中に備わっているものよ。あとお芝居もそうね。だって私は演技している時、それが聞こえるから。 

So comedians usually work..... or is very scientific because there are certain things that a comedian will do. 

だからコメディをするときも・・・ていうか、コメディって結構理論的にやるものなの。実際みんなそうしているから。 

And you can give it one, two, three beats. You can find it funny on the third beat, but it's not on the second. 

1,2,3てタイミングを取って、3のほうが笑いが取れるから2じゃなくしよう、とかね。 

 

E: Uh, it's interesting that. Because it is what happens in between. So those silences, there's no such thing as silence, of course, but what we are really paying attention to. We really are. 

エヴェリン:なるほどね。笑いを取れるポイントが、間と間のあいだってことね。そういう何もない瞬間、何もないなんてものはないけど、当り前だけど、でも私達はここに相当気を遣うわよね。 

 

G: It's like empty space in art, really. Those empty space are very powerful. 

ゴールディ:絵とか彫刻の、何も手が加わっていないところみたいなものよ。そこって相当な力を放っているところじゃない。 

 

E: It is, really. But actually, when you have the presence of the audience there, that changes everything. And the rhythm can change, the placement of sound can change. 

エヴェリン:ホントよね。でもね、実際はお客さんが眼の前にいると、ガラッと変わるものよね。リズムも変わるし、音を鳴らすタイミングも変わってくる。 

 

A: So your ambition is to teach people to listen, in a way? 

司会:君は聴くってことを世の中に広く訴えていきたいって感じなのかな? 

 

E: Oh, you know, it's quite an ambition, actually. But we all have the opportunity to do that every single day of our lives. We really do. 

エヴェリン:いやぁ、そんな大それたことは言わないわ。でもこれって、私達みんなが毎日の生活の中で、実際やっていることじゃないかしら。 

You know, we have a tendency to conduct our lives where looking downwards at the moment. 

あの、私達って何かと下の方ばかり向いていないかしら。 

We are on our mobile phones or computers, and you know, “Oh, there's someone there,” but then, “Oh, yes, this is more important.” 

携帯だのパソコンだのに夢中になって、気づいたら「あら、人が立ってる」みたいな。でもすぐに「まあ、今は手が離せないから」ってなるでしょ。 

And we are missing not just that oral attention. But listening is about looking at a person and, William said, you know, looking at a horse's eye, as you know. 

こんなことをしていると、言葉をかわすことに気持ちが行かなくなってしまう。でも「聴く」ってことは、相手を見るってことでしょ。ウィリアムに言わせれば、馬の目を見ろってことかしら。 

Well, I can sort of understand that because suddenly, if you put sunglasses on, I would not be able to lip-read you as I do now, so that whole image changes. 

ええと、私にはわかるような気がするわ。だってもし今みんながサングラスを掛けたら、イメージが全然変わってしまって、今やれているみたいな読唇(口の動きから相手が何を言っているかを知る)ができなくなってしまう。 

So, your eyes and every sort of little frown or change of expression is VERY important to me. 

だから、みんなの目とか、顔のパーツの僅かな動きとか、表情の変化とかは、私にとってはとても重要なの。 

 

A:You mentioned that you lipread because that's actually what to do. Yeah, and it's hard to believe when talking to you because you do that very well. But the fact is that you started to lose your hearing when you were eight years old. And what happened? 

司会:今読唇って言ったけど、たしかに今君がやっていることなんだけどね。まあ、あまりにもスゴイんで、君と話しているとホントに読唇しているのかと思ってしまうくらいなんだ。でも実際に、君は8歳の時に聴覚が落ち始めたんだよね。そこからどうなったの? 

 

E: Well, I had mumps and then the nerves of the ears deteriorated.  

エヴェリン:ええ、おたふく風邪にかかって、耳の神経が壊れてしまったの。 

So by the time I was twelve I was dependent on hearing aids. 

だから12歳で補聴器に頼るようになったの。 

And what I found was that the sound was boosted tremendously, but I didn't have control of the sound. 

でも今度は音が大きくなりすぎて、丁度いいところで聴くことができなくなってしまったの。 

And I didn't know where the sound was coming from. 

身の回りの音がどこから鳴ってくるのかが全然わからなくなって。 

So it wasn't so much that I couldn't HEAR sound. 

だから、聞こえなくても別に大したことないやって思っていた。 

I was almost hearing too much of that. 

だってどうせ聞こえてもウンザリするだけだからね。 

And I remember when I went to secondary school and I was already playing the piano, but I assumed that sound had to come from the ears. 

それで、今でも忘れられない。中学校に上がったときのこと。その頃はピアノが弾けていたんだけれど、まあ、当然、音っていうのは耳から入ってくるものだと思っていたわ。 

And when I was introduced to the school orchestra I saw the percussion section. 

ある日、学校のオーケストラ部を見学に行った時、打楽器セクションが目に入ったの。 

I thought “Wow, that's sort of intriguing because some instruments are small, some are large, some people are standing up to play, som people are crouching down to play things” 

それを見て私思ったの「ああ、これは面白い。小さい楽器も大きい楽器もあるし、立って演奏している人もいるし、かがみ込んで演奏している人もいる。」 

And I thought I want to be part of that, I'm quite curious toward that. 

私もここに入りたい、これは本当に面白そうって思ったの。 

Now they could've said “I don't think so. You know, deaf, music? No, they don't marry at all.” 

当時、部の方から「いや、入れないでしょ、耳が聞こえなくて音楽?結びつかないでしょ」って言われてもおかしくなかったかもしれないわね。 

But they did, and curiousity, of my perscussion teacher where he believed, will, you know, sort of propel you in a direction. 

でも「結びついた」のよ。そして部の打楽器の先生のお考えで、人間好奇心さえあれば、行けるところはあるもんだって言うわけ。 

He said, “Evlyne, would you be able, EVLYNE (chuckle), would you be able to hear more if you took your hearing aids off?” 

先生が言ったのはね「エヴェリン、あのね、エヴェリン、補聴器外しても聞こえるかどうか、やってみてくれる?」 

Now, of course I thought he landed from Mars. 

勿論その瞬間、「何だこの人?わけわかんない人ね」って思ったの。 

Really, I mean, what a question to ask. 

ホントよね、何てこと訊くのって思うじゃない。 

Of course I am not to hear more. 

勿論、外したらもっと聞こえるようになる、そんなわけないじゃないって。 

He repeated the question, and I took my time, and I thought “give it a go.” 

先生が質問を繰り返してきたもんだから、私ちょっと考えて、「やりゃいいんでしょ」って思ったの。 

I took my hearing aids off. 

補聴器を外して 

He struck a drum and he said “Evlyne, where can you FEEL that sound?” 

先生は太鼓を一発叩くと、こう訊いたの「エヴェリン、この音、君の体のどこで感じる?」 

And I thought “Where can I feel that sound?” 

「どこで感じるですって?」って思うじゃない。 

Suddenly my whole body had to stop and really be patient to LISTEN to that sound, so that the sound, really sort of, seeped through the body, and not just be coming through the ears as I thought it would be so that stike, that initial impact came through the ears, but the resonance, then, was felt through the body. 

そしたらね、突然私の体がピタリと止まって、体全体どこでも音が通っていけるように、じっと「聴かなきゃ」ってなったの。今まで思っていたのと考え方を変えて、最初は耳に入ってきたとしても、そこから音の響きは体全体で感じるものだって。 

It was just a HUGE revelation for me, it completely changed my life. 

私には大きな大きな「神様のお告げ」ってやつで、そこから人生大きく変わったわ。 

 

A: Do you use hearing aids today? 

司会:今日は補聴器は使っているの? 

 

E: No, I don't. 

エヴェリン:いいえ、今日は使ってないわ。 

 

A: Well, Evlyne, or Dame Evlyne, could you please give us a little demonstration? We have, we have your instrument, your , your little table. 

司会:さて、エヴェリン、あるいはエヴェリン卿(訳注:大英帝国勲章により「デイム」の叙勲を受けているので)というべきでしょうか、ここで少し演奏をお聞かせ願いたいのですが。こちらのテーブルに楽器をご用意しておりますので。 

 

E: Oh, woodblocks! 

エヴェリン:あら、ウッドブロックね? 

 

A: Yes, and we prepared that, and if you could just show how it work? 

司会:はい、ご用意しました。どんな風に演奏するのか見せていだければ、と思います。 

 

E: Oh, my heavens above, these are just two wood blocks 

エヴェリン:ええ、喜んで。これは何の変哲もないウッドブロックですわ。 

So if I say to you, have a look at these woodblocks, what do you think they FEEL like? 

そしたらね、このウッドブロックを見て、あなたはこれがどんな感じがすると思う? 

 

A: Uh, ... Hard? 

司会:どんなって・・・硬い? 

 

E: Hard? Do you think it's a fat sound, do you think it's a thin sound, a frightening sound? 

エヴェリン:硬い?厚みの音がするとか、薄っぺらい音がするとか、おっかない音がするとかなんだけど? 

 

A: I think it's a fat sound because of the space inside. 

司会:厚みのある音かな、この中に空間があるみたいだから。 

 

E: OK, so if you were suddenly sitting twenty rows back there, would you say the same thing? 

エヴェリン:そうね、じゃあ、もしあなたが今このスタジオの客席で20列後ろにいたら、同じように答えるかしら? 

 

A: Nope 

司会:いや。 

 

M: We are about to find about. 

男性:まあ、やってみようじゃないか。 

 

E: We all have different experiences. 

エヴェリン:私達は皆境遇が違うものよ。 

 

A: Yeah, yeah, yeah. 

司会:ええ、ええ、ええ。 

 

E: So we just assume eveyone is experiencing the same instrument, in the same way, and the same dynamics and so on, and that's not the case at all. 

エヴェリン:だからね、その場に居合わせている人がみんな、その楽器を見て、同じように、同じ音量で、とか何とか、いうように思っているというのは、全然違うのよ。 

So we all have our own PERSONAL situation or where we are; if we are sitting under a balcony, or up in a box, or back there, or right in front row, or whatever it may be. 

皆それぞれ自分が置かれている状況や環境が違うのよ。ここでも、バルコニー席の下とか、ボック席の中とか、後ろの方とか、最前列とか、色々ね。 

So if I strike one little block and really, really imagine what the total sound might be, even if we don't know where it goes, but .... (strike) 

それじゃ、一つ小さい方を叩いてみるわね。音全体としてどんな風に聞こえてくるか想像してみてね。どこにどう音が飛んでいくかわからないけれど・・・(叩く) 

 

G: Ooophs! 

ゴールディ:ビックリしたぁ。 

 

A: ........... Yeah, we can hear that. 

司会:・・・えっと、はい、聞こえるよ。 

 

E: You can hear that, but where could you feel it? (strike again) 

エヴェリン:聞こえるわよね、でもどこで感じるかしら?(もう一回叩く) 

 

A: It's like..... my spine. 

司会:まあ・・・背骨、みたいな? 

 

E: Your spine! 

エヴェリン:背骨ね。 

 

A: Yeah, I'd say that. 

司会:うん、どこか?って言われればね。 

 

E: OK, so if I play a little piece of muisic, and you concentrate on listening to this with your spine, or through your spine, but just pay attention to your spine and see what happens. (start playing the music) 

エヴェリン:いいわ、そしたらこれから一曲演奏します。背骨で、あるいは背骨を通して聞いて、でも背骨に集中して、そしてどうなるか注意していてくださいね。(演奏開始) 

 

(大きな拍手と歓声) 

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー (11) 2005年8月 (1/2)

August 2005  

Out of Thin Air  

Keith Jarrett reinvents his approach to the piano, and looks to do the same for his reputation   

By Dan Ouellette  

2005年8月 

どこからともなく/何も無いところから/何の根拠もなく/何の警告もなく 

キース・ジャレット  

ピアノへの自らのアプローチを再構築の上これまで通りの実力発揮を期する 

ダン・ウォーレット 

 

A few short weeks before both his 60th birthday and the release of an album that he calls the most important of his career, Keith Jarrett is in a buoyant mood, good-natured and eager to converse. It’s a sunny mid-April day at his house in the New Jersey countryside, and he’s high-spirited, a tad feisty and quick to laugh—hardly the demeanor with which most people associate him. To many concertgoers and even his diehard fans, Jarrett is seen as brilliant yet growly, astonishing yet dour, someone to admire but not anyone you’d want to hang out with.   

60歳の誕生日と、彼が「自分の音楽人生で最も重要」と言うアルバムのリリースを数週間後に控える中、キース・ジャレットはご機嫌で、とにかく気さくに人と言葉をかわしたい、そんな様子だ。陽光も眩しい4月も半ばのある日、自宅のあるニュージャージー州の片田舎で、彼は陽気で元気よく、どこか少し威勢の良い親分肌のようで、そしてすぐによく笑う ― それは多くの人々が思い描く彼の姿ではない。彼の多くのコンサート常連客や熱狂的ファンにとって、ジャレットは、聡明で才気に溢れるものの怒りっぽく、いつもあっと言わせてくれるものの気難しく、尊敬すべき人物ではあるものの一緒にいたいとは思わない、そんなイメージだ。 

 

“My reputation is truly not deserved,” Jarrett says, without a trace of ill temper in his voice.   

「僕に対する世間の見方は、完全に間違ってるよ。」ジャレットはその声に苛立つ様子も見せず言う。 

 

“[My reputation] is that I tell people at shows to stop making noise in the hall,” he explains, well aware that he’s probably the only jazz instrumentalist who vehemently demands an attentive audience. “It’s like it’s all personal to them. ‘Oh,’ they say, ‘he’s always in a bad mood or he’s complaining to us.’ Or some people come backstage to see me and don’t like me to be honest about some subject.”   

「コンサートで観客に『ホールで余計な雑音をたてるなよ』と言うのが僕なんだと世間は思っている。」彼がそう弁明するのは、聴衆に “音楽に集中しろ” と強要するジャズの演奏家など、恐らく彼しかいないということをよく自覚しているからだ。「彼ら(聴衆)から見れば、こんなのは僕だけだ、と思ってるだろうね。彼らは『やれやれ、ホントにいつも機嫌が悪いか、文句を言ってくるかのどっちかだな。』なんて言ってるんだろうし、あるいは楽屋まで僕に会いに来る人の中には、僕が何かのテーマについて正直に話すのを嫌がる人だっているんだから。」 

 

Jarrett has short-clipped, gray-tinged hair, is trim and looks in good shape. “People ask me why I don’t look like I’m about to be 60,” he says. “Well, it’s because I’m always moving. You don’t catch me standing still.”   

ジャレットは白髪混じりの髪を短く刈り込み、すっきりとした体つきで、体調も良さそうだ。彼は言う。「『もうすぐ60歳になるなんて見えないんだけど、なぜそんな若いの?』なんて聞かれることがあるんだ。それで『ああ、それはいつも忙しくしているからだな、僕がじっと突っ立っている姿なんて見ないだろ?』と答えるんだけど。」  

 

That may be the case physically (he’s a walker), but it also underlies the creation of the new release, Radiance, a double live solo album, recorded in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, in 2002. The two dates not only commemorated Jarrett’s 149th and 150th concerts in Japan, but also introduced a new awareness in the pianist’s creative process.   

それは彼が日頃から体を動かしているという意味でもそうかも知れないが(彼はウォーキングをしている)、2002年に日本の大阪と東京で収録されたニューリリースの2枚組ソロアルバム『Radiance』は、彼が日々 “忙しく” 音楽活動において挑戦を続けていることが礎となって生まれたものだ。この2公演は、それぞれジャレットの日本公演149回目と150回目を記念したものであるだけでなく、このピアニストが音楽創造の過程において、新たに覚醒したことを告げるものであった。 

 

Jarrett can still learn new tricks—only in this case there was no sleight of hand involved, just pure improvisational freedom that can only be expressed in 10 fingers forging a new relationship with the 88 keys.   

ジャレットは、今も新たな技を習得し得ている。だがここで言うのは、目にも鮮やかな手先の早業などではない。完全な自由を手にしたインプロヴィゼーションであり、ピアノの端から端まで88の鍵盤すべてと、彼の手の指10本すべてが、新たな関係を築くことでのみ表現できるものだ。 

 

“A couple of months before I went to Japan, I deliberately decided to take away all the hooks and all the things that I preferred in my playing,” Jarrett explains. “I didn’t want to be a victim of my own preferences. That’s what happens to players all the time. They have certain sounds and things their hands like to do better than others, and then you hear them do that all the time.”   

彼はこう説明する。「日本に向けて出発する数ヶ月前の話だけど、よく考えた末に決めたことがあって、フック(客受けを狙ったもの)や、僕が演奏に好んで採り入れていたもの、そういったものすべてを捨てることにしたんだ。自分の好き嫌いの犠牲者になりたくなかったんだよ。これはプレイヤーに常に付きまとうことだ。他のことよりも自分の手が得意とする、ある特定のサウンドや演奏内容があって、いつもそれをプレイして聴いているわけだから。」 

 

He feigns boredom.   

そう言いながら、彼は退屈しているふりをして見せた。 

 

To close the door on predictability and swing wide the portals to surprise, Jarrett says he had to undo everything that he ever did solo. It was like suffering a brain aneurysm that erased the ornamentation and intent but retained the touch and nuance that Jarrett is known for. It also helped being sidelined from solo performance for several years because of his debilitating bout with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).   

予測可能なものにはドアを閉め、驚きへの入り口を大きく開くために、ジャレットはこれまでソロでやってきたことをすべて白紙に戻さなければならなかったと言う。それは脳動脈瘤破裂に襲われたようなもので、これまでのソロにおける装飾性や演奏意図は消えてしまったが、彼ならではのタッチやニュアンスはそのまま残された。また、慢性疲労症候群による衰弱のために、数年間はソロ活動から退いていたことも奏功した。 

 

“It took that gap in my solo playing from 1996 to get to this point,” he says. “I couldn’t have come to understand this being on tour. I had to be at home and in the mood. In essence, I was looking at the piano, and then telling my left hand, ‘Look, you haven’t been let out of the cage. Is there anything you want to say?’”   

「1996年からのソロ休止期間があったからこそ、ここまで来れたんだ。」と彼は言う。「ツアーをやっていたら、このことを理解することはできなかっただろう。あの時は家にいて、気持ちを(ソロに向けて)整えなきゃならなかった。つまり要するにピアノをじっと見ながら、左手に話しかけてたんだ。『おい、いつまで檻の中でいるつもりだ。何か言いたいはことは無いのか?』なんてね。」 

 

The break in Radiance from Jarrett’s earlier solo work is manifold. The CD is his first live solo improvised concert since La Scala, recorded in 1995 and released in 1997, and his CFS-recovery ballads album, The Melody At Night, With You, recorded in 1998 and released in 1999. Jarrett’s most renowned solo performance is 1975’s The Köln Concert, the top-selling solo piano album of all time and a groundbreaking recording in that it pioneered the art of concert improvisation with no preconceived set list.   

『Radiance』がこれまでのジャレットのソロから脱却した点は多岐にわたる。このCDは『La Scala』(1995年録音、1997年リリース)と、慢性疲労症候群からの復帰を遂げたバラッド集『The Melody At Night, With You』(1998年録音、1999年リリース)以来のソロ・インプロヴィゼーションによるコンサートだ。ジャレットのソロで最も有名な作品といえば1975年の『The Köln Concert』である。ソロピアノ史上最も売れたアルバムであり、既成の楽曲によるセットリストを使わない完全即興(予め演奏内容を一切決めずに、白紙の状態で舞台に上がって即興を始めるという演奏スタイル)によるコンサートという芸術を開拓した点で、革新的な録音だった。 

 

 

On Radiance, instead of mellifluent music with expansive lyricism, a variety of spontaneous melodies rise up and disappear quickly, not to be repeated again. The tunes also resisted the improviser’s temptation to be named; hence, each piece is designated as “Part 1,” “Part 2” and so on, concluding with “Part 17.” But, perhaps most radically, only one of the pieces is longer than 14 minutes, most clock in the five- to eight-minute range. Two are remarkably short (“Part 4” is 1:27; “Part 11” 1:13).   

いっぽう『Radiance』は、(ケルンのように)伸びやかな抒情性を持つ甘美な音楽ではなく、さまざまな自発的メロディが矢継ぎ早に浮かんでは消え、そしてそれらが再び戻ってくることはない。また、楽曲はインプロヴァイザーの名前をつけたいという衝動を拒み、そのため各曲は「Part 1」「Part 2」という具合に続き「Part 17」で締めくくられる。だがおそらく最も根本的な変化は演奏時間だろう。14分を超えるものは1曲のみで、その殆どは5分から8分間に収まっている。そしてうんと短いものも2曲ある(「Part 4」が1分27秒、「Part 11」が1分13秒)。 

 

In a solo setting Jarrett actually stops instead of playing a full-set segue, where in the past he’d weave melodies into a tapestry that could cover an entire wall of a high-ceilinged museum. On Radiance, he used smaller canvases, with the color, depth and unusual design that more resembles the flat-weaved kilims that adorn the inside of his house. This too was a revelation that he discovered in his home practice studio.   

ソロの組み立ても、セット全体を通して切れ目なく演奏をつなげていくようなことはせず、曲間にしっかりと時間を取って実際に立ち止まる。これまでの彼は、まるで天井の高い博物館にそびえる壁一面を覆うほどのタペストリーにメロディを織り上げていたが、『Radiance』ではその「壁一面」から一転、小さめのキャンバスを使い、音色の豊かさや深み、その類まれなデザインは彼の家に飾られている平織りのキリムのようだ。これもまた、彼が自宅の練習スタジオで発見した「神様からの贈り物」である。 

 

“I started to play and then would stop if I felt there was an end,” he says, then asks rhetorically, “why wasn’t I doing this before? I’d be fully into the music, but maybe I was missing the whole point. I always keep a watch onstage to look at. In the past, there’d be times when I felt like stopping 25 minutes into a 40-minute set, but I’d look at the watch and say I can’t stop now. I’ll lose the whole flow, so I’ll keep playing. But then I started to think about it the other way around. If I lose the flow, that’s good because I may not want to hear what’s coming next. So, I’ll stop. Why keep playing? Just because you know how to do that?”   

「弾き始めて、ここで終わりだな、と感じたら止めるようにしたんだ。」彼はそういうと、言葉巧みに問いかけた。「なぜ今までそういう風にやらなかったのか?音楽にどっぷり浸かっているつもりが、本質を見失っていたかも知れない。僕はいつもステージで時計を置いて見ているんだけど、以前は40分のセットで25分くらい演奏したら『もうやめたいな』と思うこともあったわけだ。しかし時計を見て『今はだめだ、全体の流れが失われてしまう』と。それで演奏を続けていた。でも、その逆も考えるようになったんだ。流れが失われても、それはそれでいいじゃないか、だって次に起こることを聴きたくないかも知れないだろう?だからやめるようにしたんだよ。そもそも、ただ単に演奏を続ける方法を知っているからと言うだけで、なぜ演奏し続けなきゃいけないんだ?」 

 

 

Jarrett laughs and continues, “That got me fascinated in the creative process. Where’s the resolution? How do pieces end? If I start to play and a minute-and-a-half later I feel a piece is over, I’ll stop. It’s the freedom to stop when stopping seems correct.” While exploring this newfound freedom, Jarrett was also reading mathematician Stephan Wolfram’s 1,280-page tome, A New Kind Of Science, a book about computers and mathematical science that espouses a new paradigm for understanding how the universe works. At heart, Wolfram’s book puts forth, as one critic calls it, “that simplicity begets complexity.”   

ジャレットは笑いながら更に話を続ける。「このことは僕の創作意欲を掻き立てたよ。解決策はどこにある?どうやって曲を終わらせる?もし弾き始めて1分半でも「終わりだな」と感じたら弾くのをやめるんだ。僕が演奏をやめてもいいと思える時にやめるのが自由というわけだよ。」この「新しい自由」を探求する一方でジャレットは、数学者スティーヴン・ウルフラムの1280ページにも及ぶ大著『A New Kind Of Science』を読んでいた。この本は宇宙がどのように機能するかを理解するために新しい考え方の枠組みを提唱する、コンピュータと数理科学に関するもので、その内容が示す本質は、ある評論家に言わせれば「単純性が複雑性を生み出す」ということである。 

 

Why read that book in particular?   

この本を特に読もうと思った理由は何ですか? 

 

“I read a review of it and got interested in his concept.”   

「ブックレビューを読んで、彼のコンセプトに興味を持ったんだ。」 

 

Are you interested in computers?   

コンピューターに興味があるのですか? 

 

“Not at all. I don’t have a close relationship to them and never will.”   

「全くないね。使ってもいないし、これからも使わないだろう。」 

 

And you read the entire book?   

それなのに、その本を全部読み切ったんですか? 

 

“Yeah,” he laughs. “I’ve been known to do this. I force myself. It’s one of those things from Guru Dev. He said something like you must move your brains every day. So this was a challenge that I set up parallel to the music.”   

「もちろん。」彼は笑いながら「読み切りましたとも。僕はそういうのをよくやるんだ。無理やりね。これはグル・デヴ(スワミ・ブラフマナン・サラスワティ)の教えのひとつなんだ。毎日脳を動かせ、みたいなことだよ。これは音楽と並行してやろうと決めたチャレンジだったわけ。」 

 

And the music was also a challenge?   

音楽もチャレンジだったんですか? 

 

“Yeah. I was in a no man’s land. And here right in the middle of this search this book gets released. And I thought, I’m not going to overlook anything. That’s a part of the serendipitous nature of improvised music.”   

「そう。僕は無人島にいるようなものだった。そしてその無人島を探索している真っ最中にこの本が出たんだよ。それで思ったんだ、どんなことも見逃すまいとね。それは即興音楽の持つ偶然性の一部でもある。」 

 

And what did the book bring to the music?   

それで、この本は音楽に何をもたらしてくれましたか? 

 

“It got me thinking about how I had got myself locked into a slightly too complicated situation where the rules I had made for myself had been governing me—instead of making simple rules that could take me somewhere new. Making simple rules leads to more complex behavior.”   

「考えるきっかけだ。自分のために作ったルールに自分が支配されるという、ちょっと複雑すぎる状況にいかに閉じ込められてしまっていたかというね。もっとシンプルなルールにしてれば、どこか新しい境地へ導いてくれたはずなのに。つまりシンプルなルールのほうが、より複雑な行動を取れるようになるってことだね。」 

 

Jarrett says he only recognized how truly profound Radiance was musically when he immersed himself in the material to “get everything right” in the live mixes in preparation for release. “I started to realize how important this album is,” he says. “Recently I talked with an interviewer who commented, ‘This is so tightly constructed,’ and I thought that could be true.”   

ジャレットによればリリースの準備中、ミックスによって「すべてを正しく整理する」作業で録音されたテープの内容に没頭し、初めて『Radiance』がいかに音楽的な、真の深みを持つものかということに気づいたという。「このアルバムがいかに重要なものであるかということに気づき始めたんだ。」と彼は言う。「つい最近、あるインタビュアーと話したんだけど『これは本当にきっちり作り込まれていますね。』とコメントされて、それは本当にそうかもしれない、と思ったよ。」  

 

In the liners to Radiance, Jarrett notes, “The event lays itself out as it happened. I was slightly shocked to notice that the concert had arranged itself into a musical structure despite my every effort to be oblivious to the overall outcome. I should not have felt this way, however, for the subconscious musical choices of sequence were made out of the personal need for the next thing.”   

『Radiance』のライナーノーツに、ジャレットは次のように記している。「この日の演奏は、自然発生的に起こったことをそのまま並べている。少々ショックだったのは、結果としてのすべての演奏について、演奏者は気にしないようにあらゆる努力を払ったにもかかわらず、コンサート自体が勝手に音楽的な構造を持って組み上がっていたことだ。だがそう感じる必要はなかった。というのも、無意識のうちに行われた音楽的選択は、音楽の流れの中で次に何を弾くべきかという個人的な必要性によって行われたからだ。」 

 

Jarrett says he didn’t realize there was such an arc to the performance until he came home and listened to the tapes. He said to himself, as if objectifying the listening experience, “How did this guy know how to play that next?” He laughs, “Yeah, that was me. I was there and I played. And I don’t know except that there are miracles in the music.”   

ジャレットは家に帰って録音テープを聴くまで、そんな物語がこの日の演奏にあったことに気づかなかったという。まるで他人の演奏でも聴いているかのように、彼はつぶやいたそうだ。「こいつ、どうやって次に演奏することを知ったんだろう?」「そう、それは僕自身だったのさ。」彼は笑いながら言った。「僕がそこにいて弾いたんだ。でも音楽が奇跡だったこと以外、何も分からないんだよ。」 

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー(10) 【改訂・通し】2003年9月 (1/1)

September 2003 

The Free Spirit, Inside Out  

By Zbigniew Granat 

2003年9月  

徹頭徹尾のフリーなスピリット  

ズビグネフ・グラナート 

 

Last year’s Keith Jarrett Trio double album Always Let Me Go (ECM) is accompanied by a short narrative that the pianist wrote for the liner notes. It describes an extraordinary moment that is experienced by Ludovico, a visionary who looks at the mountains and sees an unreal scene—“a scene that could only be real in black and white”—with the sun beaming through the clouds and transfiguring trees into glittering jewelry amidst a translucent gray.  

昨年リリースされたキース・ジャレット・トリオの2枚組アルバム『Always Let Me Go』(ECM)には、ジャレットがライナーノーツに寄せた短い話が添えられている。それはルドヴィコなる空想家がある素晴らしい瞬間を目の当たりにした体験 ― 彼が山々を見つめていると、雲間から陽光が差し、木々は透き通るようなグレーの中で輝く宝石のように変わってゆく― そんなこの世のものとは思えない「モノクロの世界の中でしか存在しえないような光景」 が描かれているのだ。 

 

Wondering about his own place in relation to this scene, Ludovico realizes that this image could only have formed in his own eyes, and so he closes them. When he reopens his eyes, he sees the trees back in full color, but the memory of that extraordinary moment remains. “This was no ordinary moment. Nor were any of the preceding ones going back as far as he could remember, now that he thought about it. Was there any such thing as an ordinary moment? Perhaps only when you weren’t looking, he thought.”  

ルドヴィコは自分のいる世界とこの存在しえない光景のつながりを不思議に思い、これは自らの瞳の奥でのみ、そのイメージが形を結ぶと気づいて目を閉じる。そして再び目を開けると、木々はいつもどおりの色に戻っていた。だがあの素晴らしい瞬間の記憶は依然として残っている。「これは普通のありきたりで、何気ない瞬間ではなかった。そして今思えば、彼の記憶をたどる限り、これまでのどの瞬間もそうだった。ありきたりな瞬間なんてものがあるのだろうか?あるとしたらおそらくそれは(物事をよく)見ていない時だけだろう。」 

 

When visiting Jarrett in his secluded home in western New Jersey, it was a gloomy and somewhat disheartening afternoon, but Jarrett appeared relaxed, comfortable and open to talk about his music, creativity, artistic freedom and the spirit of jazz. Jarrett elaborated on his narrative.  

ニュージャージー州西部の、人里離れたジャレットの自宅を訪れた日はどんよりとした空模様で、なんとなく陰鬱な雰囲気が漂う午後だったが、彼はくつろいだ様子で、心地よさげに彼の音楽やその創造性、芸術の自由、そしてジャズの精神についてオープンに話し、先述のレコードに寄せた話についても詳しく説明してくれた。 

 

“It’s a metaphor for things that don’t always happen externally,” he said. “I honestly don’t know how I do what I do, but I don’t want to change anything. Although I don’t know where I get what I get, if I know it will be there, perhaps it comes from the confidence itself. Perhaps the confidence that something is there waiting is the landscape that he sees, but the color is just missing. If someone said to me, ‘Why do you play Mozart sometimes and improvise other times?’ It’s a change of landscape, it’s not a change of an entire language, nor is it even a change of what inspires me and what doesn’t. It’s a different landscape, doing the other thing for a while.”  

「あれは、物事がいつも外部で起こるとは限らない、という例えなんだ。」と彼は言った。「僕は正直言って、自分が何をどうやってやっているのか分からない。でも変えたいと思うことは何ひとつ無いんだ。どこで何が手に入るかは分からないけど、手に入れたいと思うものがそこにあるだろうと分かるなら、それはたぶん自信そのものから来るんだと思うんだ。そこに何かが待っている、という自信は彼(ルドヴィコ)が目にしている風景のことかも知れない。色が欠けているだけでね。もし誰かに「あるときはモーツァルトを弾き、またあるときはインプロヴィゼーションをするのは何故ですか?」と訊かれたらこう答えるだろう。『それは言語そのものの変化ではなく、単に風景の変化です。僕を創造へかきたてるものと、そうでないものの変化ですらありません。しばらく別のことをやっているという、ただ別の風景なだけなのです。』」 

 

Each of the musical landscapes that Jarrett has explored in his career—including solo concerts, jazz trio projects with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette, and classical performances—seems to have contributed in equal degree to the pianist’s popularity and his demand at concert venues all over the world. That’s because Jarrett’s audiences know that his sensitivity to sound and his commitment to the music he plays will always generate a wealth of moments that are everything but ordinary. Indeed, he has an ability to make old and familiar landscapes seem like impossible scenes from an imaginary world that is accessible only through the eyes of Ludovico.  

ソロ・コンサート、ゲイリー・ピーコックジャック・ディジョネットとのジャズ・トリオの取り組み、そしてクラシック演奏など、ジャレットがこれまで探求してきたそれぞれの音楽風景は、このピアニストの人気と世界中のコンサート会場での彼に対する需要に等しく貢献しているように思われる。それはジャレットの聴衆が、彼の音に対する繊細な感性や、音楽への強い思いとこだわりによって、常にありきたりなどというものとは無縁の、至福の瞬間が次々と生み出されてゆくことを知っているからだろう。まさに彼は昔からの慣れ親しんだ風景を、ルドヴィコの瞳の奥に入り込まないと辿り着けない想像上の世界の、普通ならありえない風景のように見せる力を持っているのだ。 

 

It’s been an exciting year for Jarrett. In May, the Royal Swedish Academy of Music made him the main recipient of the Polar Music Prize, which has been awarded to personalities in classical and popular music every year since 1992. Some of the past winners include Pierre Boulez, Bob Dylan, Ravi Shankar, Iannis Xenakis, Joni Mitchell, Dizzy Gillespie, Paul McCartney and Isaac Stern. This year, however, Jarrett is the sole winner of the award, as the Polar jury decided to set aside its usual “popular” and “serious” categories and justified this decision by emphasizing Jarrett’s “ability to effortlessly cross boundaries in the world of music.”  

ジャレットにとって今年は心躍る1年となっている。5月、スウェーデン王立音楽アカデミーは1992年以来毎年、クラシックおよびポピュラー音楽それぞれで活躍した人物に授与されるポーラー音楽賞の受賞者に彼を選んだ。過去の受賞者の中には、ピエール・ブーレーズボブ・ディランラヴィ・シャンカールヤニス・クセナキスジョニ・ミッチェルディジー・ガレスピーポール・マッカートニー、それにアイザック・スターンなどがいるが、今年はジャレットが単独で受賞した。選考委員会は通常の「ポピュラー」と「シリアス」というカテゴリーを設けず、その決定の根拠としてジャレットの「音楽の世界に引かれてしまっている境界をすべて難なく飛び越えてゆく力」を強調している。 

 

This year, too, Jarrett’s trio with Peacock and DeJohnette, which he has led since 1983, celebrates its 20th anniversary. This is also the main reason for the group’s extensive engagements: a spring European tour, another summer tour to Europe, and a number of performances throughout the United States in venues ranging from New York to San Francisco.  

またジャレットが1983年から率いてきたピーコック、ディジョネットとのトリオも結成20周年を迎えた。グループの活動が今年は大いに拡大したのもそれが大きなきっかけだ。春と夏のヨーロッパツアーや全米各地でも数多くの公演をこなし、その会場は、東はニューヨークから西はサンフランシスコにまで及んでいる。 

 

ECM, Jarrett’s long-time label, commemorated this anniversary with the release of Up For It, the trio’s inspired performance that took place in uninspiring circumstances—on a rainy day at last year’s Antibes Jazz Festival. That demonstrates what Jarrett’s trio has always been about: the freshness, subtlety and depth that the three imaginative and attuned musicians bring to the Great American Songbook. They offer some extraordinary moments: an almost free-jazz intensity that permeates Charlie Parker’s “Scrapple From The Apple,” a novel palette of colors skillfully applied to old tunes such as “If I Were A Bell” or “My Funny Valentine,” or the totally unexpected sonic universe of the title track that opens up from the final cadence of “Autumn Leaves.”  

この20周年をECM(ジャレットが長年籍を置くレーベル)が記念してリリースしたのが『Up For It』だ。このトリオのとびきり素晴らしい演奏が収められている。(もっともこのライヴが録音された昨年のアンティーブ・ジャズ・フェスティバルは雨に祟られ、ロケーションは「とびきり素晴らしく」ないものだったが。)このアルバムはジャレットのトリオが常に目指して来たもの、つまり想像力に富んだ3人のミュージシャンが互いに調和し、グレート・アメリカン・ソングブック(アメリカ合衆国の伝統的な流行歌やジャズのスタンダード・ナンバーとして定番となっている楽曲の総称)にもたらす新鮮さ、繊細さ、そして深みを示すものだ。チャーリー・パーカーの「Scrapple From the Apple」に横溢する、ほぼフリージャズ的な強度、「If I Were A Bell」や「My Funny Valentine」など、往年の名曲に巧みに施された斬新な色彩(音)のパレット、あるいは「Autumn Leaves」最後のカデンツから始まるタイトル曲「Up For It」の、まったく思いもよらない音世界など、3人の演奏からは、とてつもない至高の瞬間が次々と耳に飛び込んでくる。 

(訳注:カデンツ=終止形。曲の区切りや終わりを知らせる形のこと。ここでは「Autumn Leaves」の終わりと「Up For It」の始まりを知らせる8:01~8:03のコード進行を指している) 

 

While all of Jarrett’s concerts this year are going to be in the trio format, the actual program of these performances is uncertain. “I don’t know what’s going to happen,” he said, sitting in his study filled with CDs and sound equipment. “We don’t work like other bands. We don’t know what we are going to play. It’s always been the way I work.”  

今年のジャレットの公演はすべてトリオとなる予定だが、公演内容(実際の演奏曲目)は決めていない。「僕も何が起こるかわからないよ。」CDとオーディオが山積みの書斎で椅子にくつろぎながら彼は言う。「僕らは他のバンドのようなやり方はしないんだ。3人とも何を演奏するのかわからない。これまでもずっと、それが僕のやり方なんだ。」  

 

One thing that is certain, however, is that the name “Standards,” with which the group has been associated for the last 20 years, is no longer in sync with some of the trio’s most current musical ventures. As Jarrett explained, “Recently, we’ve become somehow mutated into a free music trio sometimes,” a mutation already reflected on Inside Out (ECM) and Always Let Me Go. Behind this turn toward the less restricted format is Jarrett’s strong belief that the free idiom is still a valid form of expression for today’s musicians. But “free” for Jarrett means a number of things, not merely a style unrestricted by tonal and formal constraints that listeners associate with the work of Ornette Coleman or Cecil Taylor. More importantly, the term epitomizes the trio’s principal modus operandi, which has governed its status quo for 20 years: more a state of mind than a stylistic option, more an approach or an attitude to the material than the material itself.  

だがひとつだけ確かなことがある。結成以来20年間、トリオの代名詞だった「スタンダーズ」という呼び名は、もはや彼らの最も新しい音楽的冒険とは結びつかないということだ。このことについてジャレットはこう説明している。「最近の僕らはときどき、いつの間にかフリーのトリオに変異していたりする。」その変異はすでにアルバム『Inside Out』と『Always Let Me Go』に反映されているが、こうしたより制限の少ないフォーマットへの転換の背景には、今日のミュージシャンにとってもフリー・イディオムが依然として有効な表現手段であるという、ジャレットの強い思いがあるのだ。だがジャレットの言う「フリー」には、リスナーがオーネット・コールマンセシル・テイラーの作品を連想するような、単に調性や形式といった制約を受けないスタイルのことだけではなく、実に様々な意味がある。より重要なのは、この言葉がこれまで20年にわたって、トリオがその高いレベルを維持するために主たる柱としてきた方法論を象徴していることだ。つまり(調性や形式からの解放がどうこうと言うような)スタイル上の選択肢よりも心の状態であり、素材(曲)そのものよりも素材へのアプローチや考え方といったところだろうか。 

 

When understood in such broad terms, the free element comes into play whenever the musicians commit themselves entirely to the music, or, as Jarrett said, when “the intent of what we are playing is manifested in the music. And usually the great thing about this trio is that all three of us know all the time whether that’s happening or whether that’s not happening.”  

3人がそうした広い意味で理解しているからこそ、彼らが音楽に完全にコミットする時、あるいはジャレットが言うように「僕らの演奏の意図するところが、音楽にしっかりと現れている時」に、彼の言う「フリー」の要素が発揮されるのだ。ジャレットはこう続ける。「そしてこのトリオの素晴らしいところは、僕らの意図することが演奏で起こっているかどうかを、3人とも常に分かっているということなんだ。」 

 

Such a manifestation of intention need not happen in a “free” context, stylistically speaking. It may, for instance, come forth during a rendition of a ballad melody. “So, when it is happening,” Jarrett continued, “it’s free, because something that we just played meant as much as it could mean in any other format, with or without soloing, with or without improvising. It depends on how much the desire and the manifestation of the music match each other. So, in the bigger sense, I’m already free, because if I am free to choose a ballad and I’m free to play a melody that way, then that’s being free.”  

そのように意図が現れることが、スタイル的に言う「フリー」というコンテクストの中で起こる必要はない。例えばもしかすると、バラードのメロディを演奏しているときに現れるかも知れない。更にジャレットは続ける。「だからそういうことが演奏で起こっている(意図が現れている)時は、フリーな状態にあるというわけだ。なぜなら僕らが演奏したことは、他のどんなフォーマットだろうが、ソロがあろうがなかろうが、インプロヴィゼーションがあろうがなかろうが、等しく大いに意味があるからね。それが現れるかどうかは、音楽へ欲求と、実際に音になって出てくるものが、どれだけ釣り合うかにかかっている。だから広い意味では、僕はすでにいつもフリーな状態にある。だってバラードを選ぶのも僕の自由だし、そんな風にメロディを演奏するのも僕の自由とすれば、それは自由ってことだろう?」 

 

Still, not every format or context provides the same opportunities for freedom of choice. “When I used to play classical recitals and then concerts and then recordings,” Jarrett recalled, “I noticed backstage that I was missing some important feeling before the concert. I couldn’t figure out what it was, and then I thought about it and I realized it’s the fact that I already know everything that might happen. It’s either going to be good or not good, great or terrible, but I know all the notes that are supposed to happen—and I’m not even on stage yet. So I want to be free to choose what to do and the moment I do it.”  

とはいえ、どんなフォーマットやコンテクストでも、内容の選択において同じ様に自由度が得られるとは限らない。「昔、クラシックのソロリサイタルをやって、それからコンサートをやって、さらにそれからレコーディングをやった時のことだけど、」ジャレットは回想する。「コンサート前に舞台裏で、何か大切な感覚を失っていることに気づいたんだ。それが何だか分からなかったんだけど、よく考えてみると僕はすでにこれからコンサートで起こりうることをすべて知ってしまっている、という事実だったわけ。良いことも悪いことも、素晴らしいことも酷いことも、これから起こるはずの音符はすべて知っている―しかもまだステージにすら立ってないのに。だから何をどの瞬間に演奏するかを自由に選びたいんだ。」 

 

One area in which this desire for freedom manifests itself with particular force is the solo concert. Jarrett took the genre to a new level when he played three such concerts in Tokyo last summer, his first since 1996. He attempted to change his language completely—“my previous way of playing I don’t feel so perfectly close to anymore”—and create music so free as to be almost formless.  

この自由への欲求が特によく現れているのがソロ・コンサートだ。昨年夏、ジャレットは東京で1996年以来初めてとなる3回の公演を行い、このジャンルを新たなレベルまで引き上げた。(訳注:正確には99年に東京で2公演やっている。また02年のソロ・コンサートは10月に行われたので秋。この時の公演はアルバム『Radiance』とビデオ作品『Tokyo Solo』としてリリースされた。)彼は自分の言語(ソロの演奏法)を完全に変え、ほとんど形式がないほど自由度が高い音楽を作ろうとしたのだ。「それまでの演奏のやり方は、もうそれほど完全に今の僕に近いとは感じなくなったんだ。」 

 

Attaining such a level of freedom in performance requires an unusual amount of preparation, though not preparation in the traditional sense of the word. “I was preparing for those concerts since February last year,” Jarrett said, “and when I say ‘prepare,’ I was trying to get rid of all the way of playing that was normal, and just leave a giant hole to jump into when I finally went there.” 

このレベルほどの演奏の自由度に到達するには、並々ならぬ準備が必要だ。とはいえそれは従来の意味での「準備」ではない。ジャレットは言う。「あのコンサートの準備は去年の2月からやっていた。準備と言っても、それまで当たり前だった演奏方法を全部捨てて、最終的にたどり着いたところには、飛び込むための大きな穴を残すだけにしたんだ。 

 

“Preparing for these concerts was the hardest work I ever did, because I knew what I didn’t want and I had to get rid of all those things meticulously and then try to form something new. This is hard work. It’s much easier to come up with some form that you then rely on. And even in my previous solo concerts there is no form ahead of time, but in the concerts themselves forms sort of get there and then they stay there for a while. And in these recent things in Tokyo I was committed to keeping those forms out of the picture completely, so I was always sweeping the carpets from under my feet.”  

今までで一番大変な作業だった。というのも自分が望まないものが分かっているので、それを細心の注意を払いつつ捨てていって、それから今までにない新しいものを形にしようとしたわけだから。これは大変なことだよ。それより何か形を考えて、それに頼るほうがずっと楽だ。これまでのソロ・コンサートも事前に形があるわけでは無かったけど、コンサートそのものにはある種の形がそこにあって、しばらくそこに留まるんだ。あの最近の東京公演では、そういった色々な形を完全に断ち切ると決めたから、常に背水の陣だった。」 

 

The idea to invent music that transcends its own form may seem like a very unusual approach, but for Jarrett, it’s hardly unusual. It merely represents an extension, or perhaps an extreme instance of, his theory of non-possessiveness of the music, which goes back to the time when his trio with Peacock and DeJohnette was formed.  

自らの形をさらに超える音楽を新たに創出するなどという発想は、尋常ならざるアプローチのように思えるかも知れない。だがジャレットにとっては殆どそうでもないのだ。それは単に、ピーコックとディジョネットとのトリオ結成時にさかのぼる「音楽の非所有」という彼の従来の理論を拡大したもの、あるいはおそらく、その極端な事例を形にしただけにすぎない。 

 

“The constitution of the trio from the beginning was not to possess the music we play. We were playing standards because if we didn’t play standards, we would have to play something of ours or something we would learn and then rehearse. And while we were rehearsing, we would be dictating what belongs where: Jack should play brushes, then he should play sticks; or, this is my solo, then it’s Gary’s solo, and this is how we do this arrangement. So the way you get out of that is to play music we already knew so well that nobody had to say a word.”  

「結成当初から、あのトリオの原則的な体質は音楽を所有しないということだった。僕らがスタンダードナンバーを演奏したのは、そうしないとオリジナル曲や、あるいは何か学んでリハーサルしたものを演奏しなければならなくなるからだ。そしてリハーサルをしている間中、曲のどこで何をどうするかを決めてゆくことになる。ジャックはここでブラシ、ここはスティック、ここは僕のソロ、そしたらここはゲイリーのソロ、よしアレンジはこれでいこう、とかね。そんなことから抜け出すには、僕らがすでによく知っていて、それについて3人がひと言も話さなくていい音楽を演奏すればいいわけだ。」 

 

This is exactly the conception that Jarrett introduced to Peacock and DeJohnette at a dinner in New York City, just before their first recording as a trio, Standards Volume 1 (ECM). Both musicians, though at first somewhat unclear about the full implications of Jarrett’s idea, accepted it, simply because they trusted him. They still do.  

まさにこれこそが、トリオの初レコーディング『Standards, Vol.1』(ECM)を前にしたニューヨークでの夕食の席で、ジャレットがピーコックとディジョネットに示したコンセプトだった。最初、ふたりはジャレットのアイデアの完全な意味についてやや不明瞭ではあったが、単に彼らはジャレットを信用していたのでトリオ結成を受け入れた。その信用は今もそのままだ。 

 

“Then we did our recording without doing any preparation for it, and it’s what we’ve done all along. But the funny thing is that when we do the free things with no material, it’s exactly the same as far as the constitution is concerned. We don’t own anything, we are not playing anything we rehearsed, nothing has been dictated to anybody, and so those two things—standards and free playing—are intimately connected.”  

「それから何の準備もせずにレコーディングをやって、その後も僕らはそういう具合にずっとやってきた。でも面白いことに、何の素材もなくフリーな演奏をやっても、トリオの原則的な体質としてはまったく同じなんだ。何にしがみつくこともしない。事前に準備したものを演奏しない。いかなるものにも縛られない。だからスタンダードを演奏することとフリーに演奏すること、このふたつは密接に関係しているんだ。」 

 

It is what Jarrett calls a “tribal language,” something that all three members of the group have absorbed over their lifetimes, that allows them to experience such a level of freedom and honesty in their playing, even if the vehicle they are using happens to be an old and familiar song.  

彼らの演奏する楽曲が古い昔なじみのスタンダードであったとしても、演奏にそうした高いレベルの自由と誠実さを体現できるのは、先にジャレットが言った「僕らがすでによく知っていて、それについて3人がひと言も話さなくていい音楽」のおかげだろう。そうした音楽のことを彼は「種族の言語」と呼ぶ。それは彼らトリオのメンバー全員が生涯にわたって吸収してきたものだ。 

 

“If Gary and Jack are such good listeners, as I’m sure I am, we are hearing whether what we are playing is what we intend. So if it is, we have no doubt about this. There is no doubt that we should stick with this tune, [as] this is what we intend, this is what we feel. So even though it’s this old song that somehow is sitting inside our heads for a long time, it’s now free. The song is now free. So we are now freeing the songs along with being free ourselves. That’s a rare technique.”  

「もちろん僕もそうだし、ゲイリーとジャックの “聴く力” も卓越しているからこそ、演奏が僕らの意図したものであるかどうか確かめられるんだ。そしてそれが確かなら、僕らはその演奏について何の疑いも持たない。僕らの意図と感性に沿ったものとしての楽曲の姿に、僕らは疑いなく忠実なんだ。だからずっと前から何となく僕らの頭の中にあった古い曲だとしても、僕らが演奏すれば今はもう自由だ。つまり今、僕らが自由になるのと同時に、曲も自由になるってことだね。これはそうそうやれることじゃない。」 

 

Jarrett’s obsession with freedom of musical expression has to do with his romantic sensibility, which, however, does not appear to be popular among contemporary artists. This attitude makes Jarrett almost politically incorrect.  

ジャレットが音楽表現の自由に強くこだわる背景には、彼が理性よりも感性を重んじる演奏家だということがあるが、このことは現代の(=コンテンポラリー・ジャズの)アーティスト達の間では人気がないようだ。彼らのそうした姿勢は、ジャレットを(現代ジャズ界において)政治的に正しくない存在にしている。ジャレットは語る。 

 

“We are an underground band that has, just by accident, a large audience. I don’t mean literally ‘by accident,’ but it is in some way beside the point that we have this audience,” he said. “Because we are never conformists, we are always radical, even though we may be playing what people think they know, and therefore they are comfortable momentarily or maybe even during the whole piece. But what we are doing in those pieces is a non-conforming thing.  

「僕らはアンダーグラウンドなバンドなんだ。集客数が多いなんてのはまったく、たまたまの話でね。もちろん文字通りの “たまたま” という意味じゃないけど、僕らのライヴにこんな規模で聴衆が集まるというのは、ある意味バンド本来の意図から外れるものだ。何故って、僕らは決して順応主義者じゃない。常にラディカルだ。人々が知ってると思ってる曲を演奏しているとしてもね。そういう曲を演奏すれば、聴衆の彼らはほんの束の間、場合によっては曲が演奏されている間じゅうはずっとご機嫌にいられるかも知れない。でも僕らがその曲で演奏していることは、これまでのルールや習慣や様式的なもの、あるいは時代のトレンド(つまりジャズの「政治的正しさ」)なんて全く無視したものだ。」 

 

“When the trio started to play standards, nobody was thinking it was the right thing to do, everybody had to have their own material. If you have a new band, you are playing your stuff, and when I talked to Gary, it even shocked him. It was radical: As classic and traditional as it is, it was radical. At the moment, when everybody is saying, ‘Oh, the trio can’t go anywhere from here, they can’t keep playing standards,’ Inside Out comes out, and Always Let Me Go comes out. There are subversive, subliminal messages in this that have to do with retaining our integrity and retaining our freedom under all circumstances. So that’s politically incorrect.”  

「このトリオでスタンダードを演奏し始めた頃、誰もこれが正しい取り組みだとは思っていなかった。ミュージシャンはみんな自分で書いたオリジナルを持ってて、新しくバンドを組んだらそれをやるんだ。みんなそんな風だった。だから僕がスタンダードをやるなんてゲイリーに話したら、彼はショックを受けたほどだ。それはラディカルだった。それはクラシックでトラディショナルでありながら、ラディカルだったんだ。それからしばらくして、今度は誰もが「オー、このトリオはもうここから先はないね。だいたいスタンダードナンバーなんて、ずっとやり続けられるもんじゃないっつの。」なんて言ってる時に『Inside Out』や『Always Let Me Go』が発表された。そこには反体制的で、深層心理に訴えかけるようなメッセージが込められている。それはどんな状況にあっても僕らは音楽への誠実さ、そして音楽の自由を守るぞ、というようなことだ。つまり政治的に正しくないってことだね。」  

 

For some time now, Jarrett has been politically incorrect in a more literal sense of the word. He has frequently reached for the pen in order to express views that did not always agree with mainstream viewpoints. As a result, he has become a spokesman for all those who felt similarly but who were afraid to speak out about the music played at Jazz at Lincoln Center, decry the loss of personality in contemporary jazz or criticize Ken Burns’ view of jazz history. Jarrett did it all and more, simply because he felt he had nothing to lose, and his reputation was, “just exactly perfect for this, a reputation for being difficult and egotistical and self-indulgent and a prima donna and all that stuff.”  

ここしばらくのジャレットは、より文字通りの意味で「政治的に正しくない」存在だ。ジャズ界の主流な見解には必ずしも同意しないという意見を表明するために、ペンを取ることもしばしばある。その結果、今や彼は「ジャズ・アット・リンカーン・センター」での演奏活動に対して物申したり、コンテンポラリー・ジャズにおける個性の喪失や、ケン・バーンズのジャズ史観を批判したりと、それらについて同じように感じているものの、口に出すことに怯んでしまっている人々の代弁者となっている。ジャレットは単に、失うものなど何もないと思っているからこそ、それらのすべてはもちろん、さらにそれ以上のことをやり遂げたが、おかげで彼の評判は「気難しく自己中心的。身勝手でわがまま。偉そうで殿様気取り。とにかくそういう類の言葉がすべて完璧にぴったり当てはまるいけ好かないヤツ」ということになった。 

 

Oftentimes the main blade of his critique was directed at Wynton Marsalis. “No, I don’t know him; I can’t say I personally dislike him,” he said. “I know we agree about some things: We agree that fusion was a mistake; in general, that most so-called fusion was terrible. I agree with him that there has to be some concept of purity, but his way of looking at purity as a historical thing is what’s wrong. As an improviser you can use the past, but you can’t live in it.”  

ジャレットの論難の主な矛先は、しばしばウィントン・マルサリスに向けられた。「いや、僕は彼のことは知らないし、人間性まで嫌いとは言えない。」と彼は言う。「僕らはいくつかの点で意見が一致している。例えばフュージョンの犯した間違いだ。一般的に、あのいわゆるフュージョンと呼ばれるものの殆どは酷いものだったということには同意するね。そんなものとは真逆の、純粋さというコンセプトがジャズには必要なんだということにも同意するが、純粋さを歴史的なものとして捉える彼のやり方は間違っている。インプロヴァイザーとして過去を利用することはできても、過去に生きることはできないんだ。」 

 

Jarrett’s disagreement with Marsalis on this issue has to do with his belief that “jazz is a player’s art; it’s not a writer’s art.” Therefore, he views Marsalis’ attempts at reviving older music, such as that of Duke Ellington, as misguided.  

この問題でジャレットがマルサリスと意見を異にするのは、「ジャズは演奏家の芸術であって、作曲家の芸術ではない」という彼の信念に根差している。それゆえにジャレットは、マルサリスがデューク・エリントンのような昔の古い音楽を当時のまま蘇らせようと企てていることを、方向性が間違っていると見なすのだ。 

 

In one of his letters to the editor of The New York Times several years ago, Jarrett asked a question about how Ellington’s written music sounds today when it is reinterpreted by other bands, though obviously without those master soloists that were part of Ellington’s band. His answer was: “Dry, lifeless, institutional.” That is because jazz is not concerned with performance practice, with attempts to reproduce somebody else’s sound or with using the past tense to speak about the present. On the contrary, he says, in jazz, “the player is being asked to express some personal, maybe momentary, maybe permanent to him, truths, whether they are fleeting, whether they are coming through his blood stream, or whether they are coming through his cell structure, which changes every couple of days.”  

数年前、ジャレットはニューヨーク・タイムズ紙の編集者に宛てた手紙のひとつの中で「エリントンの書いた音楽が、エリントン・バンドにいた名ソロイスト達を欠いた別のバンドによって再解釈された演奏は今日どのように聴こえるか?」という質問をしたことがある。ジャレットの答えとしては「無味乾燥、生気がなく無機質、代わり映え皆無の単なる猿真似で恐ろしくつまらない。」というものだったが、それはジャズが演奏の練習や、ほかの誰かの音を再現すること、過去の先達の言葉(演奏)を真似て現在を語ることとは無縁の音楽だからであるし、それどころかジャレットはさらにこう言うのだ。「ジャズで演奏者に問われるのは、彼にとって何らかの個人的で、おそらく瞬間的あるいは永続的に存在する真実を表現することができるかどうかという事だ。それがたとえ一瞬のうちに現れて消える刹那的なものであろうと、演奏者に流れる血潮や、数日ごとに入れ替わる彼らの細胞から来るものであろうとね。」 

 

“The thing that makes jazz so special is that it cannot be pinned down. And as soon as you pin it down, it vanishes. It’s really like quantum physics: It’s there until you are looking at it the way he is looking at it, and then it turns into a particle. It’s actually a [wave], but when he tries to play, it’s a particle, because when he plays he tries to play as other people.  

「ジャズを特別なものにしているのは、それを束縛できない点にあるんだ。ジャズは束縛、つまり自由を制限した途端に消え去ってしまう。それはまさに量子力学のようなものだ。つまりウィントンが見ているのと同じように君が見ているうちはジャズがそこにあるが、その後粒子に変わってしまう。それは実際は「波」なんだが、いずれにせよウィントンが演奏しようとした途端に粒子になってしまうんだ。 

(訳注:シュレディンガーの猫を参照するとイメージが分かりやすいので、気になる人は検索をおすすめする。有名な「観測者が箱を開けるまでは、猫の生死は決定していない」をこの場合に置き換えると「ウィントンが演奏するまでは、ジャズの生死は決定していない」とでも言えるだろうかw) 

 

That’s why he is seemingly so good as an educator: ‘This is how so and so plays, this is Louis Armstrong.’ Well, anybody that can do that has lost the ability to be himself after a while. At some point he might have been able to still be a great player. But if you do this demonstrating stuff enough, and if you believe in it, you are hammering nails into your own coffin, as far as jazz is concerned, because jazz wants to be completely out of that imitation, doesn’t want to have anything to do with this demonstrating how somebody plays.”  

だって彼は他の人の猿真似をやろうとするからね。教育者としてなら、彼はとても優れているように見える。「ほらここはこうやって演奏するんだ、これがルイ・アームストロングだよ。」なんて。まあ、そんなことを平気でやれちゃう人は、そのうち自分らしく演奏する力を失ってしまうんだけど。ある時点では、ウィントンはまだ偉大なプレイヤーであり続けることが出来たかもしれない。でもそんな空っぽのデモンストレーションばかりを疑いもなくやるのは、プレイヤーとしての寿命を縮めるようなものだ。なぜならジャズはそんな模倣からの完全な脱却を望む音楽だから、ほかの誰がどうプレイするか、なんてことをデモンストレーションするようなことには一切関わりたくないだろ?」 

 

Thus, the musician’s road to self-discovery, according to Jarrett, is not based on imitation, but rather on inspiration. “Music itself came from inspiration,” he said. “If it’s good music, it didn’t come from music. Music is a result of an inspired state or a desire for something, and if you are a musician, what you do is you translate that desire into sound. But you are not translating some music you heard into great music now. Doesn’t work like that.”  

このように、ジャレットによればミュージシャンが自己発見をしてゆく道は模倣ではなく、インスピレーションに基づくものなのだ。彼は言う。「音楽それ自体がインスピレーションから生まれるんだ。良い音楽は音楽から生まれるんじゃない。インスピレーションを得た状態や、何かを強く願う気持ちの結果として生まれるんだよ。ミュージシャンがやるべきことは、その強く願う気持ちを音にすることだ。でも自分が聴いた何かしらの音楽を、優れた演奏に転換させようとしてもそれはできない。音楽はそんな具合にはできていないんだ。」 

 

“People ask me, ‘Who do I like, what musicians did I like in the past?’ I could list many names, but I never thought of sounding anything like any of them, because that’s not what I got from them. The thing I got from them was not the sounds of the music they made. It was what must have been their inspiration to make those sounds.”  

「よく “今のミュージシャンで好きな人は誰ですか、昔はどんなミュージシャンが好きでしたか?” なんて訊かれるんだよ。そりゃたくさんの名前を挙げられるけど、だからって僕は彼らのようなサウンド(そのミュージシャン固有の特徴を持つ音)を出そうなんて考えたこともないよ。僕が彼らから学んだのはそんなことじゃない。彼らが作った音楽のサウンドではなくて、そのサウンドを作るためのインスピレーションとなったに違いないものなんだ。」 

 

Jarrett never shies away from an explanation, especially when he feels that there might be some ambiguity about what he means. He sensed that the word “inspiration” that he used did not fully express what he was trying to convey. “I wish I could think of a better word than inspiration,” he said. “It’s more a state of being than a flash of inspiration. So, a state of being isn’t an inspiration, but you attain a certain state of being by wanting more than the average state of being, so in some way you are inspired to want that.”  

ジャレットは説明することを厭わない。特に、言いたいことが曖昧であると感じた時はなおさらだ。彼は「インスピレーション」という言葉が自分の本当に言いたいことを完全に伝えきれていないと感じていた。「インスピレーションよりも適切な言葉があれば良いんだけど...」彼は言った。「それはインスピレーション、一瞬のひらめきというよりも、“ある状態” になる事なんだ。つまり “ある状態” になる事はひらめきではないけれど、通常の状態よりも多くを望むことで “ある状態” を手に入れるわけだから、ある意味それを望むような触発を受けるということだね。」 

 

He continued with an illustration: “When the trio is playing and we don’t know what’s coming next—what key we are in, or who is playing what next, or what tempo is coming up, whether we are going to be suddenly playing alone or playing together—that requires a state of being; that is what I am referring to when I say ‘inspiration.’ And that is a continual thing. It’s not dependent on getting something from nature or getting something from a certain experience. It’s something you can tap into at will when you are aware where that place is. But you have to stay pure to do that.”  

彼はさらに演奏を例にとって説明を続ける。「トリオで演奏していて、次に何が起こるかわからない時がある。次はどのキーで演奏するのか、誰が何を演奏するのか、それはどんなテンポで始まるのか、突然ひとりで演奏することになるのか、それとも3人で一緒に演奏するのか、といった具合に。そういう時には “ある状態” が必要だ。これが僕の言う「インスピレーション」なんだよ。そしてこれはいつも継続的に使うものだ。インスピレーションを得るために、自然から何かを得るとか、何らかの経験から得るとか、そういうものではないんだ。その(“ある状態”の)場所がどこなのかが分かったら、思いのままに使うことができる。でもそのためには常にピュアでいなければならない。」 

 

What he means by “pure” is that “an artist—although I also hate that word—has to live in a state of constant preparedness, and that preparedness is the state of being that one would call inspiration. So if I were to go to the studio now, I’d be able to play something of great importance, anytime.”  

彼の言う「ピュア」とはこういうことだ。「アーティストたるもの(僕もこの言葉は嫌いだが)、常に準備ができている状態で生きていなければならない。そしてその「準備ができている状態」こそが、いわゆる「インスピレーション」と呼ぶような状態なんだ。だからいまスタジオに入れば、僕はいつでも、何かしらとても重要なことを演奏することができるんだ。」 

 

Still, creativity is a phenomenon that escapes any attempt at rationalization. “Even though I am the one in the trio who should know the answer, neither Gary nor I, when we spoke about this recently, know this: How can we be so prepared, so attuned to play at exactly the same time on exactly the same night? What must we be doing with our bodies and our heads to keep that chemistry? It’s like I draw an arrow not yet going on tour, and on the plane, in the car, in the hotel the arrow is still flying until it’s eight o’clock and it comes up somewhere else in the world, in a different time zone, and we are all ready to focus on the same thing. To me that’s miraculous. But that is what jazz is about. If you take away the drugs and you take away the alcohol problems, if you take away the different eras in jazz and the technical differences between bebop and mainstream and traditional and dixieland and all that stuff, it’s really about: How can you be ready?”  

とは言うものの、創造性というものは合理的な説明からは想像もつかない現象だ。「トリオのメンバーの中では、僕がその答えを知っていなければならないのに、最近ゲイリーとそのことについて話したら、2人とも知らないんだ。いったい何だってメンバー全員が、まったく同じ夜、同じ時間のコンサートで演奏するために準備し、一致団結することができる?そんな3人の化学反応を維持するために、僕らは頭と身体を使って何をしなければならない?何もしなくていいだろ?」それはツアーに出る前に矢を引くようなものだ。僕らが飛行機や車に乗ってる時、そしてホテルにいる時、その矢はまだ飛んでいて、コンサートが始まる夜8時に、世界のどこか別の時間帯の場所にやって来る。すると僕らはみな同じことに集中する準備ができているというわけだ。僕には奇跡としか思えない。でもそれがジャズなんだ。もしジャズからドラッグやアルコールの問題、あるいは様々な年代ごとのスタイルの違い、ビ・バップとメインストリーム、トラディショナルとディキシーランド、とにかくそういったもの全ての技術的な違い。そんなものを取り除くとしたら、本当にこの事が重要だ。つまり、どうすればインスピレーションの状態、準備ができている状態になれるのか?」 

 

Part of the answer to this question has to do with the enormous amount of work and sacrifice that is involved in the process. But there is also another, more important part. Jarrett has resisted the desire to catch up with the speed of light and fly, not in supersonic planes, but in the realm of creativity governed by the spirit. There is simply no other way:  

この問いに対する答えの一部は、その境地に至るまでのプロセスに伴う膨大な量の努力や代償と結びついている。だがもうひとつ、さらに重要なことがある。ジャレットは魂が導く創造性の領域を(超音速機ではなく)光に追いつく速さで飛びたいという願望にずっと耐えている。ただ、他に方法がないのだ。 

 

“If I don’t manage to fly, someone else will. The spirit wants only that there be flying. As for who happens to do it, in that he has only a passing interest.”  

もし僕に飛べなくても、誰かが飛ぶだろう。魂はただ、飛ぶことだけを望んでいる。ところが、たまたま飛んでいる者はそんなことには、束の間の関心しかないのだ。 

 

After recalling this quote from Rainer Maria Rilke, which he used in the liner notes for Changes, Jarrett added: “Jazz can’t die. There will always be somebody willing to take that responsibility.” DB 

ジャレットは自身のアルバム『Changes』のライナーノーツで引用した、ライナー・マリア・リルケの詩句を思い出して、最後にこう付け加えた。「ジャズは死なない。その責任を引き受けてくれる者は、いつに時代にも必ず現れるはずだ。」 

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー(9) 2003年9月 (1/2)

September 2003 

The Free Spirit, Inside Out  

By Zbigniew Granat 

2003年9月  

徹頭徹尾のフリーなスピリット  

ズビグネフ・グラナート 

 

 

Last year’s Keith Jarrett Trio double album Always Let Me Go (ECM) is accompanied by a short narrative that the pianist wrote for the liner notes. It describes an extraordinary moment that is experienced by Ludovico, a visionary who looks at the mountains and sees an unreal scene—“a scene that could only be real in black and white”—with the sun beaming through the clouds and transfiguring trees into glittering jewelry amidst a translucent gray.  

昨年リリースされたキース・ジャレット・トリオの2枚組アルバム『Always Let Me Go』(ECM)には、ジャレットがライナーノーツに寄せた短い話が添えられている。それはルドヴィコなる空想家がある素晴らしい瞬間を目の当たりにした体験 ― 彼が山々を見つめていると、雲間から陽光が差し、木々は透き通るようなグレーの中で輝く宝石のように変わってゆく― そんなこの世のものとは思えない「モノクロの世界の中でしか存在しえないような光景」 が描かれているのだ。 

 

 

Wondering about his own place in relation to this scene, Ludovico realizes that this image could only have formed in his own eyes, and so he closes them. When he reopens his eyes, he sees the trees back in full color, but the memory of that extraordinary moment remains. “This was no ordinary moment. Nor were any of the preceding ones going back as far as he could remember, now that he thought about it. Was there any such thing as an ordinary moment? Perhaps only when you weren’t looking, he thought.”  

ルドヴィコは自分のいる世界とこの存在しえない光景のつながりを不思議に思い、これは自らの瞳の奥でのみ、そのイメージが形を結ぶと気づいて目を閉じる。そして再び目を開けると、木々はいつもどおりの色に戻っていた。だがあの素晴らしい瞬間の記憶は依然として残っている。「これは普通の、何気ない瞬間ではなかった。そして今思えば、彼の記憶をたどる限り、これまでのどの瞬間もそうだった。普通の瞬間なんてものがあるのだろうか?あるとしたらおそらくそれは(物事をよく)見ていない時だけだろう。」 

 

 

When visiting Jarrett in his secluded home in western New Jersey, it was a gloomy and somewhat disheartening afternoon, but Jarrett appeared relaxed, comfortable and open to talk about his music, creativity, artistic freedom and the spirit of jazz. Jarrett elaborated on his narrative.  

ニュージャージー州西部の、人里離れたジャレットの自宅を訪れた日はどんよりとした空模様で、なんとなく陰鬱な雰囲気が漂う午後だったが、彼はくつろいだ様子で、心地よさげに彼の音楽やその創造性、芸術の自由、そしてジャズの精神についてオープンに話し、先述のレコードに寄せた話についても詳しく説明してくれた。 

 

 

“It’s a metaphor for things that don’t always happen externally,” he said. “I honestly don’t know how I do what I do, but I don’t want to change anything. Although I don’t know where I get what I get, if I know it will be there, perhaps it comes from the confidence itself. Perhaps the confidence that something is there waiting is the landscape that he sees, but the color is just missing. If someone said to me, ‘Why do you play Mozart sometimes and improvise other times?’ It’s a change of landscape, it’s not a change of an entire language, nor is it even a change of what inspires me and what doesn’t. It’s a different landscape, doing the other thing for a while.”  

「あれは、物事がいつも外部で起こるとは限らない、という例えなんだ。」と彼は言った。「僕は正直言って、自分が何をどうやってやっているのか分からない。でも変えたいと思うことは何ひとつ無いんだ。どこで何が手に入るかは分からないけど、手に入れたいと思うものがそこにあるだろうと分かるなら、それはたぶん自信そのものから来るんだと思うんだ。そこに何かが待っている、という自信は彼(ルドヴィコ)が目にしている風景のことかも知れない。色が欠けているだけでね。もし誰かに「あるときはモーツァルトを弾き、またあるときはインプロヴィゼーションをするのは何故ですか?」と訊かれたらこう答えるだろう。『それは言語そのものの変化ではなく、単に風景の変化です。僕を創造へかきたてるものと、そうでないものの変化ですらありません。しばらく別のことをやっているという、ただ別の風景なだけなのです。』」 

 

 

Each of the musical landscapes that Jarrett has explored in his career—including solo concerts, jazz trio projects with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette, and classical performances—seems to have contributed in equal degree to the pianist’s popularity and his demand at concert venues all over the world. That’s because Jarrett’s audiences know that his sensitivity to sound and his commitment to the music he plays will always generate a wealth of moments that are everything but ordinary. Indeed, he has an ability to make old and familiar landscapes seem like impossible scenes from an imaginary world that is accessible only through the eyes of Ludovico.  

ソロ・コンサート、ゲイリー・ピーコックジャック・ディジョネットとのジャズ・トリオの取り組み、そしてクラシック演奏など、ジャレットがこれまで探求してきたそれぞれの音楽風景は、このピアニストの人気と世界中のコンサート会場での彼に対する需要に等しく貢献しているように思われる。それはジャレットの聴衆が、彼の音に対する繊細な感性や、音楽への強い思いとこだわりによって、常にありきたりなどというものとは無縁の、至福の瞬間が次々と生み出されてゆくことを知っているからだろう。まさに彼は昔からの慣れ親しんだ風景を、ルドヴィコの瞳の奥に入り込まないと辿り着けない想像上の世界の、普通ならありえない風景のように見せる力を持っているのだ。 

 

 

It’s been an exciting year for Jarrett. In May, the Royal Swedish Academy of Music made him the main recipient of the Polar Music Prize, which has been awarded to personalities in classical and popular music every year since 1992. Some of the past winners include Pierre Boulez, Bob Dylan, Ravi Shankar, Iannis Xenakis, Joni Mitchell, Dizzy Gillespie, Paul McCartney and Isaac Stern. This year, however, Jarrett is the sole winner of the award, as the Polar jury decided to set aside its usual “popular” and “serious” categories and justified this decision by emphasizing Jarrett’s “ability to effortlessly cross boundaries in the world of music.”  

ジャレットにとって今年は心躍る1年となっている。5月、スウェーデン王立音楽アカデミーは1992年以来毎年、クラシックおよびポピュラー音楽それぞれで活躍した人物に授与されるポーラー音楽賞の受賞者に彼を選んだ。過去の受賞者の中には、ピエール・ブーレーズボブ・ディランラヴィ・シャンカールヤニス・クセナキスジョニ・ミッチェルディジー・ガレスピーポール・マッカートニー、それにアイザック・スターンなどがいるが、今年はジャレットが単独で受賞した。選考委員会は通常の「ポピュラー」と「シリアス」というカテゴリーを設けず、その決定の根拠としてジャレットの「音楽の世界に引かれてしまっている境界をすべて難なく飛び越えてゆく力」を強調している。 

 

 

This year, too, Jarrett’s trio with Peacock and DeJohnette, which he has led since 1983, celebrates its 20th anniversary. This is also the main reason for the group’s extensive engagements: a spring European tour, another summer tour to Europe, and a number of performances throughout the United States in venues ranging from New York to San Francisco.  

またジャレットが1983年から率いてきたピーコック、ディジョネットとのトリオも結成20周年を迎えた。グループの活動が今年は大いに拡大したのもそれが大きなきっかけだ。春と夏のヨーロッパツアーや全米各地でも数多くの公演をこなし、その会場は、東はニューヨークから西はサンフランシスコにまで及んでいる。 

 

 

ECM, Jarrett’s long-time label, commemorated this anniversary with the release of Up For It, the trio’s inspired performance that took place in uninspiring circumstances—on a rainy day at last year’s Antibes Jazz Festival. That demonstrates what Jarrett’s trio has always been about: the freshness, subtlety and depth that the three imaginative and attuned musicians bring to the Great American Songbook. They offer some extraordinary moments: an almost free-jazz intensity that permeates Charlie Parker’s “Scrapple From The Apple,” a novel palette of colors skillfully applied to old tunes such as “If I Were A Bell” or “My Funny Valentine,” or the totally unexpected sonic universe of the title track that opens up from the final cadence of “Autumn Leaves.”  

この20周年をECM(ジャレットが長年籍を置くレーベル)が記念してリリースしたのが『Up For It』だ。このトリオのとびきり素晴らしい演奏が収められている。(もっともこのライヴが録音された昨年のアンティーブ・ジャズ・フェスティバルは雨に祟られ、ロケーションは「とびきり素晴らしく」ないものだったが。)このアルバムはジャレットのトリオが常に目指して来たもの、つまり想像力に富んだ3人のミュージシャンが互いに調和し、グレート・アメリカン・ソングブック(アメリカ合衆国の伝統的な流行歌やジャズのスタンダード・ナンバーとして定番となっている楽曲の総称)にもたらす新鮮さ、繊細さ、そして深みを示すものだ。チャーリー・パーカーの「Scrapple From Apple」に横溢する、ほぼフリージャズ的な強度、「If I Were A Bell」や「My Funny Valentine」など、往年の名曲に巧みに施された斬新な色彩(音)のパレット、あるいは「Autumn Leaves」最後のカデンツから始まるタイトル曲「Up For It」の、まったく思いもよらない音世界など、3人の演奏からは、とてつもない至高の瞬間が次々と耳に飛び込んでくる。 

(訳注:カデンツ=終止形。曲の区切りや終わりを知らせる形のこと。ここでは「Autumn Leaves」の終わりと「Up For It」の始まりを知らせる8:01~8:03のコード進行を指している) 

 

 

 

While all of Jarrett’s concerts this year are going to be in the trio format, the actual program of these performances is uncertain. “I don’t know what’s going to happen,” he said, sitting in his study filled with CDs and sound equipment. “We don’t work like other bands. We don’t know what we are going to play. It’s always been the way I work.”  

今年のジャレットの公演はすべてトリオとなる予定だが、公演内容(実際の演奏曲目)は決めていない。「僕も何が起こるかわからないよ。」CDとオーディオが山積みの書斎で椅子にくつろぎながら彼は言う。「僕らは他のバンドのようなやり方はしないんだ。3人とも何を演奏するのかわからない。これまでもずっと、それが僕のやり方なんだ。」  

 

 

One thing that is certain, however, is that the name “Standards,” with which the group has been associated for the last 20 years, is no longer in sync with some of the trio’s most current musical ventures. As Jarrett explained, “Recently, we’ve become somehow mutated into a free music trio sometimes,” a mutation already reflected on Inside Out (ECM) and Always Let Me Go. Behind this turn toward the less restricted format is Jarrett’s strong belief that the free idiom is still a valid form of expression for today’s musicians. But “free” for Jarrett means a number of things, not merely a style unrestricted by tonal and formal constraints that listeners associate with the work of Ornette Coleman or Cecil Taylor. More importantly, the term epitomizes the trio’s principal modus operandi, which has governed its status quo for 20 years: more a state of mind than a stylistic option, more an approach or an attitude to the material than the material itself.  

だがひとつだけ確かなことがある。結成以来20年間、トリオの代名詞だった「スタンダーズ」という呼び名は、もはや彼らの最も新しい音楽的冒険とは結びつかないということだ。このことについてジャレットはこう説明している。「最近の僕らはときどき、いつの間にかフリーのトリオに変異していたりする。」その変異はすでにアルバム『Inside Out』と『Always Let Me Go』に反映されているが、こうしたより制限の少ないフォーマットへの転換の背景には、今日のミュージシャンにとってもフリー・イディオムが依然として有効な表現手段であるという、ジャレットの強い思いがあるのだ。だがジャレットの言う「フリー」には、リスナーがオーネット・コールマンセシル・テイラーの作品を連想するような、単に調性や形式といった制約を受けないスタイルのことだけではなく、実に様々な意味がある。より重要なのは、この言葉がこれまで20年にわたって、トリオがその高いレベルを維持するために主たる柱としてきた方法論を象徴していることだ。つまり(調性や形式からの解放がどうこうと言うような)スタイル上の選択肢よりも心の状態であり、素材(曲)そのものよりも素材へのアプローチや考え方といったところだろうか。 

 

 

When understood in such broad terms, the free element comes into play whenever the musicians commit themselves entirely to the music, or, as Jarrett said, when “the intent of what we are playing is manifested in the music. And usually the great thing about this trio is that all three of us know all the time whether that’s happening or whether that’s not happening.”  

3人がそうした広い意味で理解しているからこそ、彼らが音楽に完全にコミットする時、あるいはジャレットが言うように「僕らの演奏の意図するところが、音楽にしっかりと現れている時」に、彼の言う「フリー」の要素が発揮されるのだ。ジャレットはこう続ける。「そしてこのトリオの素晴らしいところは、僕らの意図することが演奏で起こっているかどうかを、3人とも常に分かっているということなんだ。」 

 

 

Such a manifestation of intention need not happen in a “free” context, stylistically speaking. It may, for instance, come forth during a rendition of a ballad melody. “So, when it is happening,” Jarrett continued, “it’s free, because something that we just played meant as much as it could mean in any other format, with or without soloing, with or without improvising. It depends on how much the desire and the manifestation of the music match each other. So, in the bigger sense, I’m already free, because if I am free to choose a ballad and I’m free to play a melody that way, then that’s being free.”  

そのように意図が現れることが、スタイル的に言う「フリー」というコンテクストの中で起こる必要はない。例えばもしかすると、バラードのメロディを演奏しているときに現れるかも知れない。更にジャレットは続ける。「だからそういうことが演奏で起こっている(意図が現れている)時は、フリーな状態にあるというわけだ。なぜなら僕らが演奏したことは、他のどんなフォーマットだろうが、ソロがあろうがなかろうが、インプロヴィゼーションがあろうがなかろうが、等しく大いに意味があるからね。それが現れるかどうかは、音楽へ欲求と、実際に音になって出てくるものが、どれだけ釣り合うかにかかっている。だから広い意味では、僕はすでにいつもフリーな状態にある。だってバラードを選ぶのも僕の自由だし、そんな風にメロディを演奏するのも僕の自由とすれば、それは自由ってことだろう?」 

 

Still, not every format or context provides the same opportunities for freedom of choice. “When I used to play classical recitals and then concerts and then recordings,” Jarrett recalled, “I noticed backstage that I was missing some important feeling before the concert. I couldn’t figure out what it was, and then I thought about it and I realized it’s the fact that I already know everything that might happen. It’s either going to be good or not good, great or terrible, but I know all the notes that are supposed to happen—and I’m not even on stage yet. So I want to be free to choose what to do and the moment I do it.”  

とはいえ、どんなフォーマットやコンテクストでも、内容の選択において同じ様に自由度が得られるとは限らない。「昔、クラシックのソロリサイタルをやって、それからコンサートをやって、さらにそれからレコーディングをやった時のことだけど、」ジャレットは回想する。「コンサート前に舞台裏で、何か大切な感覚を失っていることに気づいたんだ。それが何だか分からなかったんだけど、よく考えてみると僕はすでにこれからコンサートで起こりうることをすべて知ってしまっている、という事実だったわけ。良いことも悪いことも、素晴らしいことも酷いことも、これから起こるはずの音符はすべて知っている―しかもまだステージにすら立ってないのに。だから何をどの瞬間に演奏するかを自由に選びたいんだ。」 

 

 

One area in which this desire for freedom manifests itself with particular force is the solo concert. Jarrett took the genre to a new level when he played three such concerts in Tokyo last summer, his first since 1996. He attempted to change his language completely—“my previous way of playing I don’t feel so perfectly close to anymore”—and create music so free as to be almost formless.  

この自由への欲求が特によく現れているのがソロ・コンサートだ。昨年夏、ジャレットは東京で1996年以来初めてとなる3回の公演を行い、このジャンルを新たなレベルまで引き上げた。(訳注:正確には99年に東京で2公演やっている。また02年のソロ・コンサートは10月に行われたので秋。この時の公演はアルバム『Radiance』とビデオ作品『Tokyo Solo』としてリリースされた。)彼は自分の言語(ソロの演奏法)を完全に変え、ほとんど形式がないほど自由度が高い音楽を作ろうとしたのだ。「それまでの演奏のやり方は、もうそれほど完全に今の僕に近いとは感じなくなったんだ。」 

 

Attaining such a level of freedom in performance requires an unusual amount of preparation, though not preparation in the traditional sense of the word. “I was preparing for those concerts since February last year,” Jarrett said, “and when I say ‘prepare,’ I was trying to get rid of all the way of playing that was normal, and just leave a giant hole to jump into when I finally went there.” 

このレベルほどの演奏の自由度に到達するには、並々ならぬ準備が必要だ。とはいえそれは従来の意味での「準備」ではない。ジャレットは言う。「あのコンサートの準備は去年の2月からやっていた。準備と言っても、それまで当たり前だった演奏方法を全部捨てて、最終的にたどり着いたところには、飛び込むための大きな穴を残すだけにしたんだ。 

 

 

 

“Preparing for these concerts was the hardest work I ever did, because I knew what I didn’t want and I had to get rid of all those things meticulously and then try to form something new. This is hard work. It’s much easier to come up with some form that you then rely on. And even in my previous solo concerts there is no form ahead of time, but in the concerts themselves forms sort of get there and then they stay there for a while. And in these recent things in Tokyo I was committed to keeping those forms out of the picture completely, so I was always sweeping the carpets from under my feet.”  

今までで一番大変な作業だった。というのも自分が望まないものが分かっているので、それを細心の注意を払いつつ捨てていって、それから今までにない新しいものを形にしようとしたわけだから。これは大変なことだよ。それより何か形を考えて、それに頼るほうがずっと楽だ。これまでのソロ・コンサートも事前に形があるわけでは無かったけど、コンサートそのものにはある種の形がそこにあって、しばらくそこに留まるんだ。あの最近の東京公演では、そういった色々な形を完全に断ち切ると決めたから、常に背水の陣だった。」 

 

 

The idea to invent music that transcends its own form may seem like a very unusual approach, but for Jarrett, it’s hardly unusual. It merely represents an extension, or perhaps an extreme instance of, his theory of non-possessiveness of the music, which goes back to the time when his trio with Peacock and DeJohnette was formed.  

自らの形をさらに超える音楽を新たに創出するなどという発想は、尋常ならざるアプローチのように思えるかも知れない。だがジャレットにとっては殆どそうでもないのだ。それは単に、ピーコックとディジョネットとのトリオ結成時にさかのぼる「音楽の非所有」という彼の従来の理論を拡大したもの、あるいはおそらく、その極端な事例を形にしただけにすぎない。 

 

 

“The constitution of the trio from the beginning was not to possess the music we play. We were playing standards because if we didn’t play standards, we would have to play something of ours or something we would learn and then rehearse. And while we were rehearsing, we would be dictating what belongs where: Jack should play brushes, then he should play sticks; or, this is my solo, then it’s Gary’s solo, and this is how we do this arrangement. So the way you get out of that is to play music we already knew so well that nobody had to say a word.”  

「結成当初から、あのトリオの原則的な体質は音楽を所有しないということだった。僕らがスタンダードナンバーを演奏したのは、そうしないとオリジナル曲や、あるいは何か学んでリハーサルしたものを演奏しなければならなくなるからだ。そしてリハーサルをしている間中、曲のどこで何をどうするかを決めてゆくことになる。ジャックはここでブラシ、ここはスティック、ここは僕のソロ、そしたらここはゲイリーのソロ、よしアレンジはこれでいこう、とかね。そんなことから抜け出すには、僕らがすでによく知っていて、だれもひと言も言わなくてもいい音楽を演奏すればいいわけだ。」 

 

 

This is exactly the conception that Jarrett introduced to Peacock and DeJohnette at a dinner in New York City, just before their first recording as a trio, Standards Volume 1 (ECM). Both musicians, though at first somewhat unclear about the full implications of Jarrett’s idea, accepted it, simply because they trusted him. They still do.  

まさにこれこそが、トリオの初レコーディング『Standards, Vol.1』(ECM)を前にしたニューヨークでの夕食の席で、ジャレットがピーコックとディジョネットに示したコンセプトだった。最初、ふたりはジャレットのアイデアの完全な意味についてやや不明瞭ではあったが、単に彼らはジャレットを信用していたのでトリオ結成を受け入れた。その信用は今もそのままだ。 

 

 

“Then we did our recording without doing any preparation for it, and it’s what we’ve done all along. But the funny thing is that when we do the free things with no material, it’s exactly the same as far as the constitution is concerned. We don’t own anything, we are not playing anything we rehearsed, nothing has been dictated to anybody, and so those two things—standards and free playing—are intimately connected.”  

「それから何の準備もせずにレコーディングをやって、その後も僕らはそういう具合にずっとやってきた。でも面白いことに、何の素材もなくフリーな演奏をやっても、トリオの原則的な体質としてはまったく同じなんだ。何にしがみつくこともしない。事前に準備したものを演奏しない。いかなるものにも縛られない。だからスタンダードを演奏することとフリーに演奏すること、このふたつは密接に関係しているんだ。」 

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー(8)2001年8月(1/1)

August 2001 

Keith Jarrett: Acoustic Pianist of the Year 

By Ted Panken 

2001年8月  

キース・ジャレット:アコースティックピアニスト賞受賞  

テッド・パンケン 

 

“Jazz may be the only art form that asks the player—not the conductor, not any detached entities from the actual playing—to find out who he is and then decide if it’s good enough to speak from that self, and then that player has to live with who he said he was until the next time he plays. It’s an incredibly rigorous and merciless things, unless you’re doused with drugs or something. And strangely enough, that rigorous thing is the representation in musical form of freedom. So jazz is a metaphor for important things.” —Keith Jarrett  

「おそらくジャズは演奏者(と言っても指揮者や、実際に演奏をしない者は除いてだが)に、まず自分が何者かを理解し、そしてそれが話す(演奏する)に足るものかどうかを判断し、さらにその話した通りの自分を、次に演奏する時まで生きなければならないことを求める唯一の芸術かも知れない。それはとてつもなく厳しく、容赦のないことだ。薬か何かでもやってない限りはね。そして不思議なことに、その厳しいことこそが、音楽という形での自由の表現なんだ。だからジャズは色々と大切なものを象徴的に表現しているんだ。」:キース・ジャレット 

 

During Keith Jarrett’s lengthy convalescence from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a debilitating illness cause by bacterial parasites, the piano master managed to record a group of songs in his home studio as a Christmas present for his wife. The music—stripped to essentials, devoid of bravura or rhetorical excess—was unlike anything in his oeuvre, and ECM, his label since 1971, decided to release the tapes to the public. The Melody At Night With You became one of the best selling jazz albums of 1999.  

細菌感染によって引き起こされる衰弱性の病気である「慢性疲労症候群」から回復するまでの非常に長い期間に、このピアノの名手は妻へのクリスマス・プレゼントとして自宅スタジオで数曲を録音した。その音楽は無駄を極限まで削ぎ落とし、勇壮華麗な技巧も、過度に大げさな美辞麗句も一切なく、これまでの彼の全作品と比べても全く見られないものだった。1971年以来、彼が所属するレーベルであるECMはこのテープを公式にリリースすることを決定し、アルバム『The Melody At Night, With You』は1999年に最も売れたジャズ・アルバムのひとつになった。 

 

The sound of The Melody At Night With You was not merely a pianistic projection of Jarrett’s personal sufferings. The album foreshadowed an esthetic sea change, one that developed while Jarrett struggled to reestablish his instrumental voice.  

『The Melody At Night, With You』のサウンドは、単にジャレットが自身の苦悩をピアニスティックに投影したものではない。このアルバムが予兆させたのは、ジャレットがもう一度、自らのピアノの音を確立し直そうと悪戦苦闘する中で生まれ、形となった彼の音楽的な美意識の著しい変貌だった。 

 

Unsure whether he’d perform again, Jarrett listened intently to his recorded past, and began to practice tunes. “Practicing usually gets in the way of my performing,” Jarrett says. “It’s like it sets up patterns or makes my ears less open. I’ve often said the art of the improviser is the art of forgetting; our brains can probably forget better than our fingers. But after I was sick, I had to practice everything. I had no choice but to listen to what I had done, because I wasn’t sure I’d ever do anything else again. I had to make it sound right to myself, and I was leery of a lot of my musical choices. I had time to erase my patterns, and became more connected to the music’s history and older performance practices that I played long ago.”  

演奏活動への復帰が不透明な中、ジャレットは過去の録音を徹底的に聴き込み、曲の練習を始めた。ジャレットはこう語る。「練習をすることは、たいてい演奏の邪魔になるんだ。パターンが決まってしまうというか、耳が完全にオープンに演奏を聴けなくなるというか。これはいつもずっと言ってるんだけど、インプロヴィゼーションするということは、それを忘れることでもある。たぶん人間の脳は、指よりもうまく忘れられるんだ。でも病気になった後、僕は何から何まで練習しなければならなくなった。もう二度と何もできないかも知れないと思ったから、僕がこれまで演奏してきたものを聴き込むよりほかなかった。過去の演奏を聴くと、それを今の自分に正しく聴こえるように変える必要があったし、過去に自分がやっていた音楽的な選択の多くが嫌だった。そうした自分の型を消し去る時間が取れて、今まで以上に音楽の歴史や、僕が大昔にやった古い奏法と繋がりを持つようになった。」 

 

Looking for a way to return to concertizing “with a fresh outlook that also met my energy level,” Jarrett found himself drawn to bebop repertoire, with which he had flirted with but had never met on his own terms. “I’d heard the pieces, but hadn’t heard them very much,” he notes. “I came along around the time when that wasn’t the thing to do anymore.” He decided to eschew solo concerts and classical recitals, and made his long-standing trio with bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette the focal point of his musical universe.  

「新鮮な気持ちで、なおかつ自分の気力と体力のレベルに合わせて」コンサートに復帰する道を探っていたジャレットは、ビバップのレパートリーに惹かれていることに気づいた。若い頃に軽く手を出したことはあったが、自分の意思でしっかり向き合ったことは全く無かったものだ。そのことについて彼はこう指摘した。「この手の曲は耳にしたことはあったけど、そんなにしっかりと聴き込んだことはなかった。僕が音楽活動を始めた頃は、もう時代遅れの感があったんだ。」彼はソロ・コンサートとクラシック音楽のリサイタルを避けることを決め、ベーシストのゲイリー・ピーコック、ドラマーのジャック・ディジョネットと長年続けているトリオを、全ての音楽活動の中心に据えることにした。 

 

“On our first concert after Keith started to play again, we all consciously tried to tone down the volume level,” Peacock says. “He was paying attention not to exert himself physically so much. I remember a concert in San Francisco that was absolutely spectacular, and we played practically pianissimo, which the hall demanded, and which allowed him to move his fingers like a horn. His playing is lighter, freer. Less self. More just the music.”  

「私達とキースがまた演奏し始めた最初のコンサートでは、全員が意識して音量を落とそうとしたんだ。」そう語るのはピーコックだ。「彼は身体的にあまり無理をしないように注意を払っていた。サンフランシスコでのコンサートは本当に凄かったのを覚えてるよ。ホールの基準では殆どピアニッシモのレベルまで音量を落としたんだ。おかげで彼はまるでホーンを吹くように指を動かすことができた(ピアノをオーケストラ的に両手をフルに使って鳴らすのではなく、管楽器のように基本はシングルトーンで音数を絞った演奏をした)。彼の演奏は以前に比べるとより軽く、より自由になった。自分を出すことがより控えられ、より音楽そのものになったんだ。」  

 

That comment describes the ambiance of Jarrett’s two post-illness trio recordings, Whisper Not, a 2000 release documenting a July 1999 Paris concert, and Inside Out, his latest. On the former, Jarrett makes a German Steinway dance buoyantly through 14 canonical tunes, gracefully conjuring free-as-the-wind melodies with a minimum of fuss and an economy of means. He is particularly inspired on “What Is This Thing Called Love,” which opens with a lengthy study in propulsive counterpoint, on Bud Powell’s “Hallucinations” and George Shearing’s “Conception,” on which he carves out long, sparkling theme-and-variation declamations, deploying jagged left-hand syncopations in the piano’s lower reaches. He extracts the essence from such ballad staples as Billy Strayhorn’s “Chelsea Bridge,” Duke Ellington’s “Prelude To A Kiss” and Thelonious Monk’s “Round Midnight.” There’s a nod to stride piano ancestors on “Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams,” and a highly personalized “Poinciana” in tribute to Ahmad Jamal.  

このコメントは病気後にジャレットが発表した2つのトリオ録音の雰囲気をよく表している。ひとつは1999年7月のパリ公演を収めた『Whisper Not』(2000年リリース)、もうひとつは最新作『Inside Out』だ。前者はジャレットがドイツ製のスタインウェイを14曲のスタンダードで軽やかに踊らせる。興奮を最小限に抑え、余計な手数を極力排した無駄のない奏法によって、風のように自由な旋律が優雅に紡がれてゆく。彼が特にのめり込むように触発されているのが、推進力のある対位法での長い精神集中で始まる「What Is This Thing Called Love」だ。バド・パウエルの「Hallucinations」やジョージ・シアリングの「Conception」では、左手でピアノの低音域を使ったギザギザと荒削りなシンコペーションを効果的に展開しながら、長めのキラキラと煌くような主題と変奏のデクラメーション(朗唱するように言葉や意味、抑揚を重視してフレーズを歌うこと)を彫琢し、ビリー・ストレイホーンの「Chelsea Bridge」、デューク・エリントンの「Prelude To A Kiss」、そしてセロニアス・モンクの「Round Midnight」といった定番バラードからは、その曲の本質を引き出して見せる。「Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams」ではストライド・ピアノの先駆者達を偲び、アーマッド・ジャマルへのトリビュートである「Poinciana」は彼らの音楽として高度に消化されている。 

 

Unencumbered by any predisposition except to listen and find material in the moment, Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette impart to their statements the improvising-from-point-zero approach that is their collective trademark, avoiding cliché while imparting the idiomatic nuances of phrasing and forward motion that define bebop and make it live.  

演奏しながらその一瞬一瞬を集中して聴き、楽曲を見いだすこと以外は何も負担となることがない状態で、ジャレット、ピーコック、そしてディジョネットはトリオのトレードマークである「ゼロからのインプロヴィゼーション」というアプローチを彼らの声明とも言えるその演奏に施し、ビバップを明確に特徴づけ、生き生きとしたものにするフレージングの慣用的なニュアンスや、グイグイと前進する運動を示しながら、ありきたりな表現とならないようにしている。 

 

“The piano in Paris that is on this recording was like a Mack truck, very heavy and thick action,” Jarrett notes wryly. “Luckily, it was the last of four concerts in Europe, and I decided to use whatever energy I had—if I made it through the concert, good; if not, at least it was the last one. Some of these things are personal triumphs. Every now and then, I would barely be able to get that piano to speak.  

「この録音で使っているパリのピアノは、まるでマックトラックみたいに重くて、アクションも鈍かったんだけど、」ジャレットは皮肉交じりにそう語りはじめた。「運良く、ヨーロッパで4回あったコンサートの最後だったから、持てる力をすべて使おうと決めたんだ。コンサートをやり切れればしめたものだし、だめでもまあ、少なくとも最後の1回だけだという気持ちだった。こういうのは個人的な勝利でもあるんだ。あのピアノはたまに音を出すのがやっとで、ピアノで話すことなんて殆どできない時もあった。」  

 

“A piano is a structured thing, basically a percussion instrument, and when it is in perfect operating condition, let’s say ready for a Chopin recital, it doesn’t have much personality, because it’s so even. I would guess that the pianos bebop pianists played had been pounded to death, were fairly light action, and only in tune if they were lucky. Imperfect instruments create a character that can be contagious, and an improviser works with that. If you think of Wynton Kelly, you realize that almost always, when things were really cooking, the piano had a particular quality that would never be considered good for anything but jazz. I’m not sure how jazz would have come about if everything had been perfect from the beginning.  

「ピアノは構造的なもので、基本的には打楽器だ。例えばショパンのリサイタル用に準備するような完璧な動作状態のものはあまり音に個性がないんだよ。全てのバランスが均一に取れすぎているからね。ビバップのピアニスト達が弾いたピアノは死ぬほどガンガン叩かれてとんでもなく軽いアクションになっちゃって、運が良ければ調律されてて音程がまともなやつに当たる、そんな感じだったと思うんだ。不完全な楽器で演奏すると、聴く者に伝染するような個性が生まれるんだけど、当時のインプロヴァイザーはそういうピアノを使っていた。ウィントン・ケリーのことを思い出してみれば分かると思う。演奏が実にうまくいってる時はほぼいつでも、ピアノが何か特有の個性を持っていて、でもそれはジャズ以外の音楽では、とてもじゃないが良いとは言えないものなんだ。何でもかんでも最初から完璧だったら、ジャズなんてどうなってたもんだか分かんないよ。」  

 

“My special problem and my special expertise is that I’m coming from both places at the same time. If we play a ballad, I need the piano to do things that only an optimally adjusted piano can do. But when we play a bebop head, I wish the piano could change radically. I am probably one of the few players who more often than not can find a way to make the piano do what it actually doesn’t want to do, and sound appropriate for the situation.” Whisper Not was released about 15 months after the concert that yielded it, by which time, predictably, Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette were exploring fresh terrain, that building collective improvisations from a blank slate, just as Jarrett did on several hundred free associative solo concerts between 1971 and 1995. “It’s a bitch doing that in a group, because we have to be wired together,” Jarrett says. “There’s no format. There are no mistakes. Everything is etched. You have to use whatever you play.”  

「僕だけの特別な問題であり、特別な演奏技術は、僕が両方の場所から同時に音楽をやるということなんだ。バラードを演奏する時は、完璧な状態のピアノでしか出来ないことを弾く必要がある。でも脳をビバップに切り替えて演奏する時は、ピアノが根本から変わって欲しいんだ。ピアノが本当は望まないことをさせて、その状況にふさわしい音を鳴らすなんてことを普通にやれるピアニストは、僕のほかには数えるほどしかいないだろう。」『Whisper Not』は、その元となったコンサートから15ヶ月後にリリースされたが、周囲の予想通り、その頃にはジャレット、ピーコック、ディジョネットの3人は、白紙の状態からの集団インプロヴィゼーションを構築するという新たな境地を開拓していた。これはジャレットが1971年から1995年にかけて何百回と行った、自由で連想的に発展してゆくソロ・コンサートと全く同じことだ。そのことについてジャレットはこう語る。「グループでそれをやるなんて、とんでもなく大変なことだ。僕ら全員が一体となってぶっ飛ばなきゃいけないからね。形式はない。間違いもない。すべてがさらけ出される。自分の持ってるものは何でもすべて使わないといけないんだから。」 

(訳注:正確にはソロコンサートは96年まで行われている。) 

 

Trained from early childhood “to be a virtuosos,” Jarrett was in his middle teens when he heard his unschooled youngest brother elicit sounds from the piano that made him consider the notion of playing “free.”  

「ピアノの巨匠となる」べく、幼い頃から研鑽を積んできたジャレットは10代半ばの頃、まだ学校にも通っていない、いちばん下の弟がピアノから音を出すのを聴いて「自由に演奏する」ことを考えるようになった。 

 

He cites the music of Charles Ives and Henry Cowell and Paul Bley’s input on the 1961 recordings of the Jimmy Giuffre Trio as important directive signposts toward a path that would allow him to transcend technique. “I heard Ives play studies for some of his written pieces, which I knew from the page, and they didn’t seem at all even related to the pieces he wrote!” he says. “And Paul Bley was giving me a message that you could use intelligence in a certain way—that it didn’t have to swing. “In Boston, I had a bass player who asked me, ‘Do you really want to play that clean all the time?’ I said, ‘That’s a very good question. And no, I don’t.’ I had to work for a long time to get some imperfections in the technique—because that’s where the soul of something lays. I heard a lack of something. That bass player’s question started those balls rolling in me to try to find out what that lack—at least in my case—might be. What did I really hear?  

テクニックを超越する道を歩もうとする彼が、その重要な指標と見なした音楽がチャールズ・アイヴズ、ヘンリー・カウエル、そしてポール・ブレイが1961年にジミー・ジュフリー・トリオのレコーディングで弾いたピアノだ。キースはこう回想する。「僕はアイヴスが書いた習作を演奏するのをいくつか聴いた。僕はそう書かれていたから知ったのであって、聴いただけでは彼の書いた作品とは何の関係もないようなものだった!」「それとポール・ブレイは僕にメッセージをくれた。ある方法で弾くときは知性を使うこともできる、つまり必ずしもスイングする必要ない、とね。ボストンにいた頃、あるベーシストが『ホントにいつもあんなにキレイな演奏したいと思ってるわけ?』って。僕は答えた。『すごく良い質問だ。いや、そうじゃないな。』僕は長い間、テクニックに不完全さを得るために取り組まなきゃならなかった。なぜならそこに何か魂のようなものが宿っているからだ。僕の演奏には何かが欠けているように聴こえた。そのベーシストの問いがきっかけになって、その「何か」を探ろうと僕の中のスイッチが入ったんだ。少なくとも僕の場合はそんな感じだったと思う。僕が聴いたのは、本当に何だったんだ?」 

 

“Up to the late ’60s, I was working on who I was musically. When I played something that sounded like someone else, I used to say, ‘No, that’s really not me.’ Then I did a tour with [bassist] J.F. Jenny-Clark and [drummer] Aldo Romano. One evening, when I came back on the stage after a set break, I realized that to find your voice was probably way down on the list of priorities. Rather, once you find your voice, the imperative is to play, and not think about that. It was possible to drop that other shit, and just say, ‘Well, I’m who I am when I’m playing’ That freed me to do whatever I heard. If a player gets stuck in their own voice, where do they go from there? Nature doesn’t say, ‘I’ve got these materials; I’m only going to use them for one thing. Make sure it’s me.’ Nature says, ‘I’m going to do as many things as I can, and let’s see how much there is.’  

「60年代の終わりごろまで、僕は音楽的に自分が何者であるかということ取り組んでいた。自分の演奏が誰か他の人の演奏のように聴こえると『違う、こんなの本当の僕じゃない。』なんてよく言っていたよ。そんな中、僕はベーシストのJ.F.ジェニー=クラーク、ドラマーのアルド・ロマーノとツアーをやったんだ。ある晩のこと、セットの合間の休憩時間が終わってステージに戻ったら気づいたんだ。自分の声を見つけるということは、たぶん優先順位としてはずっと下の方なんだとね。むしろ一度それを見つけたら、もうそのことは考えずにとにかく演奏することが肝心なんだ。僕はもう他にたわごとを言うのをやめて、その時まさにこう言った。『そうだ、演奏してる時が自分なんだ。』おかげで僕は吹っ切れて、耳にしたものは何でも弾くようになった。もしプレイヤーが「自分の声、自分らしさ」なんてことを考えすぎて行き詰ってしまったらどうする?自然の創造主は『素材を手に入れたぞ、使い道はただひとつだ。私であることを確認してもらおう。』なんて言わないよ。『できるだけ多くのことをやってみよう、どれだけあるのか見てみようじゃないか。』 と言うんだ。」 

 

“Change is the eternal thing. We’re talking about the creative act, and the creative act continues to demand different things from you as a player. You don’t say, ‘I think it would be very creative of me to do this.’ The act asks you.”  

「変化こそが永遠に続くことなんだ。創造的な行為についての話だよ。創造的な行為はプレイヤーに対して、常に異なる色んなものを出してみせろと求め続けるんだ、ずっとね。『これさえやってればとっても創造的だと思うよ。』なんて言わないんだ。創造的な行為が自分に対して求めているんだから。」  

 

“Playing free involves a tremendous amount of preparation,” says Peacock, a ’60s pioneer in the idiom with Albert Ayler and Bley. “If you persist, you reach a point where you give up a personal investment in how you sound—how good you are or how bad you are, in what you personally have to say, in what you think you should do—and simply listen. That is the moment of the beginning of freedom. This opens up a huge space, because then, in a sense, you are out of the way. You don’t forget everything you learned. It’s just there. The essence of free playing doesn’t distinguish between forms, whether it’s so called ‘free jazz’ or standards or anything. It’s just free to play.”  

60年代にアルバート・アイラーポール・ブレイと共にフリー・イディオムの先駆者であったピーコックは「自由に演奏するということは、とてつもない準備が自ずとそこに含まれている。」と語る。「とにかく頑張り続ければ、自分がどう聴こえるか、なんて個人的な事への自己投資に諦めがつく境地にたどり着く。つまり、自分がいかに優れているか、いかに劣っているか、自分らしく何を語る(演奏する)べきか、何を考えて行動すべきか、そんなものを全部放り出して、無心で「聴く」というところに立つわけだ。それこそが自由の始まる瞬間だ。これで広漠たる視界が開ける。なぜならその時、ある意味では決められた道から外れるからね。そうなっても自分が身につけたことをすべて忘れてしまうわけではない。それは間違いなくそこにある。自由に演奏することの本質は、形式で音楽を決めつけて区別しないことだ。いわゆる「フリージャズ」とか「スタンダード」とか何とか。ただ自由に演奏する。それだけだ。」 

 

Creating such an environment was precisely Jarrett’s intent in convening the trio 18 years ago. “Playing standard tunes was not at all the thing to do in 1983, and before our first recording, I asked them to have dinner so I could explain why I wanted to play them,” he related last year in a conversation about Whisper Not. “I told them that I wanted us not to rehearse our own material, not to say ‘use brushes here, we’ll go into time here.’ Playing jazz doesn’t depend on material, and I think what we do is much more the core of what jazz is. To play jazz and make something valuable out of it takes a perfect balance of two things—mastery and the relinquishing of control.”  

このような環境を創造することこそ、18年前にジャレットがこのトリオを招集した意図そのものだったのだ。昨年彼は『Whisper Not』についての対話で次のように語っている。「1983年当時、スタンダートナンバーを演奏するなど、普通はやることじゃなかった。それで最初のレコーディングの前に、なぜそれを演奏したいのかを説明しようと僕は彼らを夕食に誘った。僕はふたりに、自分たちの曲でリハーサルはやりたくないことや『ここはブラシでいこう』とか『ここは拍にのっていこう』とか、そんなことも言いたくないと話した。ジャズを演奏することは曲に依存するものではないし、僕らがこれからすることは、もっとジャズの核心に迫るものだと思っているとね。ジャズを演奏して価値あるものを生み出すには2つのこと、熟練した演奏技術と、それによってコントロールすることの放棄、つまり無作為であることがバランスよく共存することが必要なんだ。」  

 

Those comments came 10 weeks after the two London concerts that comprise Inside Out. The core of the CD is a de facto suite of three extended improvisations. Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette draw upon their full spectrum of experience, creating cohesive statements in which blues language—as Jarrett states in the program notes—is a common denominator. They feel structured, but no structures were predetermined.  

このコメントが公表されたのはアルバム『Inside Out』を構成する、ロンドンでのふたつのコンサートから10週間後のことだった。このCDの核となるのは3つの長いインプロヴィゼーションからなる事実上の組曲だ。ジャレット、ピーコック、そしてディジョネットが、それぞれの経験を遺憾なく発揮し、一致団結した演奏を創造してゆく。ジャレットがプログラムノートで書いているように、そこではブルースが共通言語となっている。その演奏において彼らは互いに構造化しているように感じるが、そんなものは何ひとつ決められていない。 

 

“The objects sort of appear before us, and it’s mostly the piano that invokes them, in the way I might invoke them in a solo concert, “ Jarrett says. “Jack and Gary right away see what I am hearing—or very shortly thereafter see what they are hearing–and we all find the center of that thing. We did this a couple times.”  

ジャレットはこう語る。「なんと言うか、色々なものが僕らの前に現れてきて、そのほとんどはピアノによって呼び起こされたものだ。僕がソロコンサートでやるのと同じような感じでね。ジャックとゲイリーは僕が聴いていることをすぐに理解する。あるいは2人が聴いていることを、僕がほんの少し後で理解していることもある。そうやって僕らはみんなでその演奏の中心を見つけるわけだ。そんなことが何度かあった。」 

 

In the ensuing year, he adds, “We’ve gone much further into the head space of free playing—into the ozone immediately. I hear Inside Out as a prelude to what we’re doing now. What we’re doing now is freer, and not as easy to listen to.”  

その次の年、彼は更にこう付け加えた。「僕らはフリー演奏のヘッドスペース、つまりはるか高みの境地まで行き着いたんだ。地球で言うならオゾン層まで一気にね。『Inside Out』は、今やっている取り組みの前奏曲のように聞こえる。今僕らがやっていることはより自由だけど、聴きやすいものではないね。」 

(訳注:このキースの言葉は『Always Let Me Go』のことを指していると思われる)  

 

Amidst the three-way interplay, Jarrett remains the trio’s programmatic guide. “I have instincts about form over large periods of time,” he says. “I think without my little pushes and pulls, it wouldn’t cohere. But when you hear the tapes we did in Tokyo that will probably be our next release, we all sound like we disappeared. I feel that our identities become erased in the quality of energy we’re working with. Me less than them, because unfortunately it’s hard to make the piano elastic—it keeps popping back into being a lever system. Because my instrument is chordal, if a slump is coming up or we feel something is not there, the only person who can suggest tonality, or a lack of it, or direction, or motion, or dynamics in any quick and coherent way that could be grasped by the other two is the piano.”  

三者三様のインタープレイの中で、ジャレットがトリオの先導役であり続けることについて、彼はこのように語った。「僕はとにかく長時間の形式というものに対して直感を働かせている。僕のちょっとした押し引きがなければ、まとまらないだろう。でもおそらく次のリリースになると思う東京公演のテープを聴くと、僕らはみんな消えてしまったように聴こえるんだ。僕らがやってることから生まれたエネルギーの質の中に、僕らのアイデンティティが消えてしまうような気がする。僕の消え方だけが他のふたりより弱いけどね。それはなぜかと言えば、残念ながらピアノに柔軟性を持たせるのは難しいんだ。どうしたって(ベースやドラムのようではなく、構造的な)レバーシステムに戻ってしまうから。ピアノは和声楽器だから、演奏に不調が見られるようになったり、何かが欠けているなと感じたら、僕だけが調性を提案したり、逆に無調にしたり、演奏の方向性や動き、あるいはダイナミクスなんかをすぐさま残りの2人へ明解に伝えることができるんだ。」  

 

 

A self-described skeptic about all belief systems, including his own, Jarrett professes utter faith in the chemistry that makes his trio breathe as one. “We are different people, and the alchemy we get when we play together comes from our separate natures,” he says. “But nothing is great on its own, and no description can make that person as great as I feel they are. We’ve been together for so long, and we understand each other’s language and trust each other 100 percent. It’s like we were watching kids grow up—and we’re one of the kids. When we play, we’re morphing more and more into what we could have been before, but we didn’t know it yet.”  

自分自身を含めてあらゆる信仰の体系に対して懐疑的であると自称するジャレットは、彼のトリオが呼吸をひとつにする化学反応に全幅の信頼を寄せていると断言する。「それぞれ違う人間の僕らが一緒に演奏することで得られる錬金術は、僕らの個々に異なる性質から生まれるんだ。」彼はそう語った。「でもバンドに限らず、それだけで素晴らしいなんてものは存在しないし、ゲイリーとジャックを僕がどれほど素晴らしいと思っているかを説明する方法も存在しない。僕らは本当に長く一緒にやってきて、お互いの言葉を知り尽くし、100%信頼しあっている。それは子供の成長を見守っているようなもので、僕らもその子供のひとりなんだ。僕らは演奏するたびに、今まであり得たかも知れないけど、僕らがまだ気づいていない姿にどんどん変化していくんだ。」 

英日対訳:「ダウンビート」キース・ジャレットへのインタビュー(7)1999年9月 (1/1)

September 1999 

Keith Jarrett Counts His Blessings  

By Dan Ouellette 

1999年 

9月 キース・ジャレット、曙光を探す  

ダン・ウーレット 

 

In an ego-driven culture, too much gets taken for granted. Too little is appreciated until it’s sorely missed.  

エゴが原動力の文化では、過剰なまでに多くを持っていることが当然だと思われている。それが惜しまれるほど少なくなるまで、ありがたみはわからないものだ。 

 

Keith Jarrett can relate. Struck down by chronic fatigue syndrome in the fall of 1996 and confined to the sidelines by the debilitating bacterial disease, the pianist not only canceled all of his engagements but also seriously wondered whether he would ever be able to perform again. “Nobody learns to appreciate that time more than someone who was denied it,” he says about the short intervals of practice he’s only recently been able to handle. “Playing piano has been my entire life.”  

キース・ジャレットは今まさにこの状態と言える。1996年の秋に慢性疲労症候群に倒れた彼は、その体を蝕み続ける細菌性の病気のせいで第一線から端へと追いやられた。このピアニストは全ての契約をキャンセルしたばかりでなく、再起できるかどうか真剣に悩んでいる。最近ようやくこなせるようになった僅かな練習時間について、「その時間のありがたさを、それが与えられなくなった者ほど知るものはいないよ。」と彼は言う。「ピアノを弾くことが僕の人生のすべてだからね。」 

 

It’s difficult to imagine the dynamo at the keys stilled. One of jazz’s most athletic pianists, Jarrett’s concerts are unforgettable visual experiences. Case in point: the latest Standards Trio video, Keith Jarrett/Gary Peacock/Jack DeJohnette Tokyo 1996 (on RCA/BMG Video, a companion to last year’s scintillating ECM recording). Recorded a few months before Jarrett fell ill, the video captures him soaring in ecstasy, restlessly throwing his entire body into improvisational torrents. In sync with the music, he stands, he crouches, bends his knees, tucks his head close to the keys, swivels his hips and sprawls elastically across the keyboard.  

鍵盤を前にじっとしている姿が想像し難い、このジャズ界きっての精力的なピアニストであるジャレットのコンサートは、忘れられない視覚体験だ。良い例は最新のスタンダーズトリオのビデオ『Keith Jarrett/Gary Peacock/Jack DeJohnette Tokyo 1996』(RCA/BMGビデオ。昨年の素晴らしいECM作品『Tokyo'96』のビデオ版 )だろう。ジャレットが病に倒れる数ヶ月前に収録されたこのビデオは、恍惚の表情で舞い上がり、止まることなく全身をインプロヴィゼーションの奔流へ投じ続ける彼の姿を捉えている。音楽に合わせて立ち上がり、身をかがめ、両膝を折り、頭を鍵盤にうずめ、腰を左右に振り、鍵盤の端から端までしなやかに両腕を広げるのだ。 

(訳注:現在はECMからDVDで『Live in Japan 93/96』(ECM 5504/05)としてリリースされている) 

 

“It’s hard for me to remember playing that way since I got sick,” Jarrett says with a laugh shortly before traveling to the West Coast to perform trio dates in Los Angeles and San Francisco. “I don’t have as much to throw into it. I have to limit myself to the keyboard a little more these days.” He pauses, then adds, “Well, if I’m not really active on one number, that means I’m saving the jumping for the next.”  

「病気になってから、自分があんなふうに弾いていたなんて思い出すのも難しいんだ。」ジャレットが笑いながらそう語ったのは、ロサンゼルスとサンフランシスコでのトリオ公演のため西海岸へ出発する少し前のことだった。「今までのように演奏で多くのことを集中してできない。最近は鍵盤を前にしても今までよりもう少し自分を制御しなければならないんだ。」少し間をおいてから、こう付け足す。「だから、ある曲であまりアクティブに弾いてない時は、次の曲のために力をセーブしているってことだね。」 

 

Nearly four years since his last appearance in San Francisco, Jarrett took the stage at the sold-out Masonic Auditorium—only the third time he appeared in concert since contracting CFS—and it was quickly evident he was keeping the physicality of his performance in check. Instead of vigorously surrendering to the music as he did on his last visit, Jarrett, dressed head-to-toe in black, except for a white and black print vest, proceeded at a subdued pace, hunching over the keyboard, leaning back as if steering the notes into shape and a little later crouching as if ready to pounce. It was the first concert of the San Francisco Jazz Festival’s Swing into Spring series, and while Jarrett’s flamboyance was noticeably lacking, his engagement with the music was incandescent.  

前回のサンフランシスコでの公演から約4年、慢性疲労症候群に罹ってからはまだたった3回目であるメソニック・オーディトリアムでの公演はソールドアウトだ。演奏中の彼が体を動かすのを抑えているのはすぐにわかった。前回彼がここを訪れたときのように、音楽に激しく身を委ねるようなことはなく、彼は全身を黒い衣装でつつみ(ベストだけは白と黒のプリント)、控えめのペースで演奏を進めてゆく。次々と生まれる音符を組み立ててゆこうとしているのか、体をのけぞらせてみたかと思えば、わずかに体を屈め、今にも飛び上がるかのような様子もうかがわせた。この日はサンフランシスコ・ジャズ・フェスティバルの「Swing into Spring」シリーズ(春へ向かってスウィングしよう)の初日で、以前のような華やかさは明らかに失われていたものの、ジャレットの音楽への没頭とその白熱っぷりは見事としか言いようがなかった。  

 

It was a textbook display of intuitive music-making, the kind of seamless improvisation only possible when bandmates are tuned into the same wavelength (Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette have ben playing together since 1983, making it one of the most stable—and popular—combos in jazz). Contorting his face and squinting his eyes at junctures of intensity, Jarrett uttered his trademarks “ahhhhs” of satisfaction. He embarked on mesmerizing journeys while the rhythm team offered up currents of support. It was a triumphant show, the strongest of Jarrett’s three shows thus far, according to his manager Stephen Cloud, and for more spirited than might expected given his near brush with retirement.  

それはバンドメンバーが同じ波長で揃ったときにしか出来ない、見事に調和したインプロヴィゼーションで、直感的な音楽づくりのお手本のような出来栄えだった(ジャレット、ピーコック、ディジョネットは1983年からずっと演奏を共にしており、ジャズ界きっての安定した人気を誇るコンボのひとつである)。演奏に強烈な瞬間が訪れるたびに、ジャレットは顔を歪め、目を細め、その代名詞とも言うべき満悦の声を「アーッ!」とあげる。リズムチームのふたりによどみない流れのサポートを受けて、彼は魅惑的な「音の旅」へと躍り出ていた。彼のマネージャーであるステファン・クラウドによれば、引退の文字が目の前でちらついていたことを考えるとこの日の公演は大成功、予想以上に魂のこもったもので、ジャレットのこなした3つの公演中では最も力強い出来栄えとのことだ。 

 

“It felt like forced cessation,” says the 53-year-old Jarrett in reflecting on the sickness that kept him largely bound to his rural New Jersey house for over two years. “I wasn’t on hiatus. That wasn’t the case, because I had come to terms with the prospect of never playing again. I was too sick to come to terms with anything else. A year and a half ago I’d go look at my pianos and think, yes, they’re still here. Then I’d leave the room. I thought if you can’t play, you can’t play. I was not going to try to compete with myself after my lobotomy.  

53歳になったジャレットは、2年以上にわたってニュージャージーの片田舎にある自宅での静養を余儀なくされたこの病気を振り返り、「まるで強制的に音楽活動を中断させられた気分だ。」と語る。「でも当時の僕は活動を中断してるつもりはなかった。なぜなら、もう演奏は出来ないだろうと覚悟を決めていたからね。それ以外のことについては、具合が悪すぎて覚悟を決めるどころではなかったよ。1年半前の僕といえば、2台あるピアノを見に行っては ”そうだ、まだここにあるんだ” なんて思って、そして部屋を離れる、そんなことを毎日やっていた。弾けないものは弾けないと思っていたんだ。ロボトミー後の自分と勝負しようなんて思わなかったからね。」 

(訳注:キースの言うロボトミーが具体的にどういった内容の手術であったかは不明なので、ここではキースの言葉通り、ロボトミーと訳すだけにとどめておく。) 

 

Hyperbole? Jarrett’s not joking. “No one knows how debilitating this sickness is unless they have it. It’s like if you get migraines, someone may say, ‘Oh, I get headaches so I know what it’s like.’ But you can’t imagine how bad they are unless you’ve had a migraine yourself. But this is a much more horrible disease.” So, it’s more than just being tired or burned out, a common perception? “Are you kidding? I’ve met people who have had it for 10 years, 25 years. Some are bedridden, some can’t walk across the street. It’s stupid to call it chronic fatigue syndrome. It should be called the forever dead syndrome.”  

大げさな物言いだと思われるかもしれないが、ジャレットは冗談を言ってなどいない。「この病気がどれほど力を奪うものなのかは、なってみないと分からない。片頭痛になったら誰かに『ああ、私も頭痛持ちだから、どんな感じか分かるよ。』なんて言われるかも知れないようなものだ。自分が片頭痛になったことがない限り、それがどんなに酷いかは分からないだろう?でも僕のこの病気は、そんなのよりもっと恐ろしいんだ。」ということは一般的に認識されている、”疲労” とか “燃え尽き症候群” よりひどいものなんですか?「冗談だろ?僕はこの病気に10年や25年も苦しむ人達と実際に会ってきている。寝たきりや道路を歩いて横切ることすら出来ない人達もいるんだ。『慢性疲労症候群』なんて呼び名は馬鹿げてるよ。『永久死亡症候群』と名前を変えるべきだ。」 

 

Jarrett contracted the illness during a tour in Europe. He was suddenly overcome by such a profound sense of fatigue that he told his wife he felt like aliens had invaded his body. He realized several months later that’s precisely what happened, as CFS is cause by an airborne parasite. Back home, Jarrett heard about a doctor who was conducting a study, treating the disease aggressively as a bacterial infection and claiming to reverse the symptoms in a relatively short time—meaning a couple of years.  

ジャレットはヨーロッパでのツアー中にこの病気を発症した。彼は突然どうしようもない疲労感に心身を制圧されてしまい、妻に「宇宙人に体を侵されたようだ。」と訴えたという。彼は数カ月後に、慢性疲労症候群は空気感染で発症するなど、自分の身に何が起きたのかを正確に把握した。家に戻るとジャレットはこの病気の研究をしている医師がいて、細菌感染性のものだとして積極的な治療を行っており、比較的短期間(2~3年)で回復できると主張していることを耳にする。 

 

It’s significant that Peacock and DeJohnette were one stage with him when Jarrett made his first concert appearance in two years at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark last November. They’ve recorded more than a dozen projects together, including a six-CD set Keith Jarrett At The Blue Note: The Complete Recordings, which won the DownBeat Critics Poll as album of the year in 1996.  

昨年11月、ニューアークニュージャージー・パフォーミングアーツセンターで行われたジャレットにとって2年ぶりのコンサートで、ピーコックとディジョネットが一緒にステージに立ったことは大変な意味がある。(訳注:その後『After the Fall』として発表された)彼らはこれまで10以上のアルバム収録をこなしてきており、その中には6枚組CDセット『Keith Jarrett At The Blue Note: The Complete Recordings』(96年のダウンビート誌批評家投票では年間最優秀アルバムに選ばれた)も含まれている。 

 

“I couldn’t have done it without Gary and Jack,” Jarrett said. “There are no better people to be on stage with. But knowing about my condition, they were both concerned I might push too hard. There’s a low ceiling as to what you can do. If you hit the ceiling, you can have a relapse. The problem is you don’t know where that ceiling is before it’s too late. That’s when you get hammered again.”  

「このニューアークでのコンサートは、ゲイリーとジャックがいなければできなかった。」とジャレットは言う。「一緒にステージに立つには、これ以上のふたりはいない。でも僕の体調を知ってるだけに、ふたりは僕が張り切りすぎやしないか心配していた。今の僕には、やれることの上限が低くなっている。その天井に触れてしまったら病気が再発する可能性がある。問題はその天井がどのくらいにあるのか、手遅れになるまでわからないことだ。そうなるとまた打ちのめされることになる。」  

 

That’s what happened last summer when Jarrett and his trio mates met together for the first time in a couple years to rehearse for an October date in Chicago. It proved to be too taxing for him, so he was forced to cancel the engagement. As for the Newark concert, Jarrett expresses ambivalence. “The show came off really well considering I wasn’t fully ready to play. I wish more of me could have been at that concert, but the music itself was great.”  

それが現実に起きてしまったのが、去年の夏だった。10月のシカゴ公演にむけてのリハーサルのためにトリオは数年ぶりに集まったが、このリハーサルはジャレットにとってあまりに負荷の重いものとなってしまい、公演のキャンセルを余儀なくされたのだ。ニューアークでのコンサートについて、ジャレットは複雑な心境をこう語っている。「僕の体調が万全でなかったことを考えると、コンサートは本当に良い出来だった。もっと力を発揮したかったけれど、音楽自体は素晴らしかったよ。」 

 

Even though Jarrett knew he wasn’t in his prime, he was chomping at the bit to get back in action. “I heard this story about a race car driver who had a bad accident. As he was recovering, people kept asking him when he was going to race again. He said not until he was 110 percent. For the last two years I’ve been mulling that over. I knew he was right, that I’d want to be in better shape, but I also realized I was getting older every year. That’s why I decided to jump back in prematurely. All the shows I have set up for the near future are based on the hope that I can do more each time. Nine months ago, there was no way I was even thinking about setting up concerts. Let’s just say right now I’m cautiously optimistic.”  

ジャレットは自分が最高の調子ではないことは自覚しつつも、活動を再開することを切望していた。「大事故に遭った、あるレーシングドライバーの話を聞いたんだ。彼が回復するに連れ、周りの人々はいつレースに復帰するのかをずっと訊ね続けた。すると彼は自分が110%になるまでと答えたそうだ。僕はこの2年間、そのことをずっと考えていた。彼の言う通り、僕もできればもっと良い状態まで回復したかったけど、同時に年々歳をとっていることも自覚していた。だから思い切って早々に復帰しようと決心した。近々やる予定の公演はすべて、毎回もっとできるようになりたいという希望で決めたものだ。9ヶ月前はコンサートをやるなんて考えてもいなかったよ。今は慎重かつ楽観的にやっている、というところだね。」 

 

In some ways, Jarrett’s forced sabbatical is similar to his self-imposed withdrawal from the music world in 1985. Back then, it was a crisis time that forced him to reflect more deeply on his musical vision. Jarrett returned to action with the cathartic recording of Spirits. Is there anything in his CFS experience that sheds such a positive light? “A lot of good things have come out of having this disease, but none that are expressible in art. Basically, it strips you to the bare bone, to a place where you have nothing to express. You find out what life is about, and that is survival. Plus, if I had gigging all the time, I’d have never had the time to notice what I didn’t like about my playing and make changes.”  

ジャレットは今回、安息日を強要された形になったが、これは1985年、自ら一時的に音楽業界から身を引いた時といくつか似た点がある。当時は彼の音楽活動の展望についてより深く考えざるを得ない危機的状況にあった。この時ジャレットは『Spirits』を録音することで己の精神を浄化し活動を再開したが、今回の慢性疲労症候群の経験に、あの『Spirits』のようなポジティブな光を放つものはあるのだろうか?「この病気になったことで良かったことが沢山あるけど、芸術で表現できるようなものは何もないね。そもそもこの病気は人を表現なんて何も出来ないところまではぎ取って骨だけにしてしまう。命とは何かを知ること、それが生き残ることだ。あと、休まずギグをずっと続けていたら、自分の演奏の気に入らなかったところに気づくことはなかったろうし、変わることもできなかっただろう。」  

 

The new Keith is basically the old Keith with slightly different inflections. For example, he says his voice is much more tuned in to bebop now than it was before. “I’ve been trying to free up my left hand to play like the middle bop period where much of the real stuff of modern jazz was born. I’m adding in these little jagged things with my left hand that might get in Gary’s way more. I’m trying to pay tribute to bop-era pianists every time I play.”  

新しいキースは基本的に、これまでのキースと比べるとわずかに異なる抑揚の表現がある。例えば彼が言うには、以前よりもさらにいっそう演奏をビ・バップに最適化させているとのことだ。「左手を自由に解放して、モダンジャズの神髄が生まれたミドルバップ期のような演奏をするようにしてるんだ。ちょっとギザギザした感じのものを左手で加える。ゲイリーにとっては邪魔かもしれないようなやつをね。今は毎回のコンサートで、バップ時代のピアニストに敬意を表して演奏しようとしている。」  

 

Jarrett chafes when asked who specifically he’s paying tribute to. Still, upon a little prodding he responds. Bud Powell? “Well, if I had to name someone, sure. But I also think of Lennie Tristano even though I hate the way he played right on beat all the time. But basically I’m trying to hear the history of jazz as well as play into the future while playing the stupidest standard tunes. If that helps some people understand why Gary, Jack and I have a zillion recordings of standards, then good. All three of us love melody and don’t like playing clever.”  

敬意を払う相手を訊ねると、彼は苛立ちの表情を見せるが、それでもこちらが重ねて訊ねると答えてくれる。バド・パウエルですか?「まあ、誰か名前を挙げるとしたら確かにそうかな。でもレニー・トリスターノもそうだ。もっとも僕は彼がいつもひたすら正確にオンビートで弾くのが大嫌いだけどね。でも僕は基本的にどんなに出来の悪いスタンダード・ナンバーの演奏をしてる時でも、未来に向かって演奏しようと心がけているし、ジャズの歴史に耳を傾けようとしている。そのことを一部の人たちが知って、ゲイリーとジャック、そして僕の3人がなぜ膨大な量のスタンダード・ナンバーを録音してきたかを分かってくれるならそれは良いことだね。僕らは3人ともメロディが大好きで、小賢しい演奏は好きじゃないんだ。」 

 

Having been so sick and having to consider the very real possibility of a relapse, Jarrett counts his blessings. He’s content working with the trio and prepared to resign himself to never writing any new material again. “It’s too much to think about right now. If I write something that requires rehearsals, well, that’s way in the future because of the energy it requires. It really doesn’t matter if I ever do anything new again, because the act of making music is so important. If I’m able to only do that a few times, I won’t ask for more.”  

重い病気を患い、再発の可能性を極めて現実的に心配しなければならなかったジャレットはいま、曙光(明るい兆し)を探している。彼はトリオでの活動に満足していて、もう新しく曲を書くことからは手を引く心づもりができている。「今は作曲のことを考える余裕はない。リハーサルが必要な曲を作るとしたら、それはずっと先の話だ。エネルギーが必要だからね。でも実際のところ、そういうのはどうでもいいんだ。音楽をつくること自体が重要だから。それが少しでもやれるなら、それ以上は望まない。」 

 

Jarrett’s slowly on the mend. But he’s cautious. “The parasite isn’t gone. These days I’m thankful if I can practice a half hour in the morning and then another half hour later in the day. I’m testing my limits and hoping I won’t overdo it. It’s pretty scary because I could wake up tomorrow and say, oops. But so far so good.”  

ジャレットは徐々に快方に向かっている。だが彼は慎重だ。「寄生虫がまだいるんだ。このところは朝に30分、日中に更に30分練習できれば良いほうだよ。自分の限界を試しながら、やりすぎませんようにと願っている。かなり恐ろしいよ。一線を越えてしまったら、次の日の朝起きて『しまった!』ということになる。でも今のところは順調だよ。」