英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

<総集編>サッチモMy Life in New Orleans 第3章

.chapter 3 (pp33-51) 

 

NEW ORLEANS CELEBRATES the period from Christmas through the New Year jubilantly, with torch light processions and firing off Roman candles. In those days we used to shoot off guns and pistols or anything loud so as to make as much noise as possible. Guns, of course, were not allowed officially, and we had to keep an eye on the police to see that we were not pulled in for toting one. That is precisely what happened to me, and as a matter of fact that is what taught me how to play the trumpet.  

ニューオーリンズでは、クリスマスから正月にかけて盛大なお祝いが繰り広げられる。人々は松明をもって練り歩いたり、ローマンキャンドルと呼ばれる円筒花火を噴射したりする。当時は鉄砲でも拳銃でも、大きな音がするものを何でもいいから鳴らして騒々しさを更に盛り上げるのが常だった。勿論、僕達子供は法律では銃のたぐいは禁止だった。だから、もしも懐に忍ばせるなら、警察に見つかって捕まらないよう気をつけていなくてはいけない。しかしこれが何と、僕の身の上に起きてしまったのだ。そして実を言えば、やがてこれが僕がトランペットを習うきっかけにもなるのだった。 

[文法] 

we used to shoot off guns and pistols 

私達は長身の銃や拳銃をよくぶっ放した(used to shoot) 

that is what taught me how to play the trumpet 

それが私にトランペットの吹き方を教えたことだ(what / how to) 

 

I had found that .38 pistol in the bottom of Mayann's old cedar trunk. Naturally she did not know that I had taken it with me that night when I went out to sing. 

以前、メイアンの古い木製トランクの奥の方から、.38スペシャル弾の銃を見つけていた。その夜、僕が歌いにでかけた時も、それを持ち出したことは、メイアンは知る由もなかった。 

[文法] 

I had found that .38 pistol in the bottom of Mayann's old cedar trunk 

私はその.38スペシャル弾の銃をメイアンの古い翌檜の木で作ったトランクの底にあるのを事前に見つけていた(had found) 

 

First I must explain how our quartet used to do its hustling so as to attract an audience. We began by walking down Rampart Street between Perdido and Gravier. The lead singer and the tenor walked together in front followed by the baritone and the bass. Singing at random we wandered through the streets until some one called to us to sing a few songs. Afterwards we would pass our hats and at the end of the night we would divvy up. Most of the time we would draw down a nice little taste. Then I would make a bee line for home and dump my share into mama's lap.  

僕は友達4人とアカペラのカルテットを組んでいた。お客さんを集めようといつもこんなことをしていた。パーディド通りとグラヴィア通りの間にあるランパート通りから練り歩く。リードボーカルとテナーが揃って先導し、バリトンとバスがあとに続く。あれこれと歌いながら各ストリートを練り歩き、そのうち誰かが2・3曲歌ってゆけと呼び止める。ひとしきり歌い終えると、帽子をとってお代をいただき、一晩仕事を終えると、みんなで山分けする。大抵の場合成果はそこそこよかった。僕はまっすぐ家に帰ると、僕の分け前を母の膝の上に広げるのだった。 

[文法] 

followed by the baritone and the bass 

バリトンとバスがあとから付いてきて(followed by) 

 

Little Mack, our lead singer, later became one of the best drummers in New Orleans. Big Nose Sidney was the bass. Redhead Happy Bolton was the baritone. Happy was also a drummer and the greatest showman of them all, as all the old-timers will tell you. As for me, I was the tenor. I used to put my hand behind my ear, and move my mouth from side to side, and some beautiful tones would appear. Being young, I had a high voice and it stayed that way until I got out of the orphanage into which I was about to be thrown.  

リードボーカルリトルマックは、後にニューオーリンズで一番のドラム奏者になった。バスは団子っ鼻のシドニーバリトン赤毛のハッピー・ボルトン。ハッピーも後にドラム奏者となり、ショービジネスで大活躍した。昔の人に聞いてみればみなそう言うだろう。僕はテナーだった。僕は片方の手を耳たぶの後ろにやって、口を左右に動かして、そうすると声色が良くなった。僕はまだ小さかったので、地声が高く、このあと収監されてしまう少年施設を出所するまでは声変わりしなかった。 

[文法] 

Being young, I had a high voice 

若かったので私の声は高かった(Being young) 

 

As usual we were walking down Rampart Street, just singing and minding our own business, when all of a sudden a guy on the opposite side of the street pulled out a little old six-shooter pistol and fired it off. Dy-Dy-Dy-Dy-Dy-Dy.  

"Go get him, Dipper,” my gang said. 

Without hesitating I pulled out my stepfather's revolver from my bosom and raised my arm into the air and let her go. Mine was a better gun than the kid's and the six shots made more  

noise. The kid was frightened and cut out and was out of sight 

like a jack rabbit. We all laughed about it and started down the street again, singing as we walked along.  

ある日、普段どおりにランパート通りを練り歩き、普段どおりに歌いながら仕事をしていた時だった。突然通り向かいの男が小さめで旧式の6連射の拳銃を抜くと、ダダダダダダっと発砲した。 

「ディッパー、あいつに負けんなよ!」メンバーが言った。 

僕は迷わず、ままパパのリヴォルヴァーを懐から抜くと、片手で持って上に向けて発砲した。僕の持っていたほうが高性能で、銃声も大きかった。その男はビックリしてジャックうさぎのように一目散に逃げ去った。皆大笑いすると、再び通りを練り歩き、歌い始めた。 

[文法] 

just singing and minding our own business 

ひたすら歌って自分達の仕事に集中しながら(singing and minding 

 

Further down on Rampart Street I reloaded my gun and started to shoot again up into the air, to the great thrill of my companions. I had just finished firing my last blank cartridge when a couple of strong arms came from behind me. It was cold enough that night, but I broke out into a sweat that was even colder. My companions cut out and left me, and I turned around to see a tall white detective who had been watching me fire my gun. Oh boy! I started crying and making all kinds of excuses. 

ランパート通りをかなり進んだところで、僕は拳銃の弾を込め直し、再び上に向けて発砲し始めた。連れの3人をびっくりさせてやろうと思ったのだ。最後の一発を打ち終えたところで、僕は背後から屈強な両腕に取り押さえられた。その夜は底冷えだったが、僕は更に冷や汗が吹き出てきた。3人の連れは僕を置いて逃げ去ってしまい、僕は振り向いて見ると、背の高い白人の刑事がいた。僕が発砲するのをずっと見ていたのだ。大変なことになってしまった!僕は泣き叫ぶと、思いつく限りの言い訳を始めた。 

[文法] 

I turned around to see a tall white detective who had been watching me fire my gun 

僕は振り返ると、僕が銃を発泡するのをずっと見ていた背の高い白人の刑事を見た。(to see / who had been watching) 

 

"Please, mister, don't arrest me. . . I won't do it no more. . . Please. . . Let me go back to mama. . . I won't do it no more."  

It was no use. The man did not let me go. I was taken to the Juvenile Court, and then locked up in a cell where, sick and disheartened, I slept on a hard bed until the next morning. 

「お願いです、刑事さん、僕を逮捕しないでください。二度としませんから。お願いです。お母さんのところへ帰らせてください。二度としませんから。」 

無駄なあがきだった。その人は僕を見逃してはくれなかった。僕は少年裁判所へ連行されると、独房へ入れられた。僕は辛く心傷つき、硬いベッドで翌朝まで横になった。 

 

I was frightened when I woke. What were they going to do to me? Where were they going to send me? I had no idea what a Waifs' Home was. How long would I have to stay there? How serious was it to fire off a pistol in the street? Oh, I had a million minds, and I could not pacify any of them. I was scared, more scared than I was the day Jack Johnson knocked out Jim Jeffries. That day I was going to get my supply of papers from Charlie, who employed a good many colored boys like myself. On Canal Street I saw a crowd of colored boys running like mad toward me.  

翌朝目覚めると、怖くなった。僕は何をされるんだろう?どこへ連れて行かれるんだろう?少年孤児院って何だろう?いつまで閉じ込められるんだろう?通りで発砲するのってそんなに悪いことだったの?頭の中が一杯になって心の整理がつかなくなってしまった。僕は怖くなった。ジャック・ジョンソンがジム・ジェフリーを倒した日より、もっと怖くなった。その時のことを思い出した。僕は新聞売りに出ようとして、チャーリーのところへ仕入れに行ったのだ。チャーリーは僕のような有色人種の子達を沢山雇っていた。仕入れに行く途中、カナル通りで白人でない子達が大勢こちらに向かって猛ダッシュしてきていた。 

[文法] 

How serious was it to fire off a pistol in the street? 

通りで拳銃を発砲することはどれほど重大なことなのか?(it to fire) 

 

I asked one of them what had happened. "You better get started, black boy," he said breathlessly as he started to pull me along. "Jack Johnson has just knocked out Jim Jeffries. The white boys are sore about it and they're going to take it out on us."  

He did not have to do any urging. I lit out and passed the other boys in a flash. I was a fast runner, and when the other boys reached our neighborhood I was at home looking calmly out of the window. The next day the excitement had blown over.  

そのうちの一人に何が起きたのか訊いた。「お前逃げたほうがいいぞ、兄弟」その子は息を切らしながら言うと、僕の腕を引っ張って連れて行こうとした。「ジャック・ジョンソンがジム・ジェフリーを倒しちまったんだ。白人の子達が怒り狂って、俺達に報復しに来るぞ。」 

彼に急かされるまでもなかった。僕は駆け出すと、他の子達を一気に引き離す速さで逃げた。僕は足が速かったのだ。他の子達が家の近くまでたどり着いた頃には、僕は自宅の窓辺でゆったり外を眺めていた。次の日には、騒ぎは収まっていた。 

[文法] 

You bettter get started 君は出発したほうがいい([had] better get) 

 

But to return to the cell in which they had kept me all night for celebrating with my stepfather's old .38 revolver, the door was opened about ten o'clock by a man carrying a bunch of keys.  

"Louis Armstrong?" he asked.  

"Yes, sir."  

"This way. You are going out to the Colored Waifs' Home for Boys."  

When I went out in the yard a wagon like the Black Maria at the House of Detention was waiting with two fine horses to pull it. A door with a little bitty grilled window was slammed behind me and away I went, along with several other youngsters who had been arrested for doing the same thing I had done. 

ふと今我に返れば、ここは独房。ここで一晩、ままパパの.38スペシャル弾の銃でもって騒いで楽しんだせいで閉じ込められて過ごしたのだ。朝の10時頃ドアが開くと、鍵の束をもった男の人が現れた。 

ルイ・アームストロングだね?」 

「はい、そうです。」 

「こちらへ来なさい。これから君を少年孤児院へ連れていくからね。」 

外に出ると、留置場の囚人護送車のような馬車が止まっていた。毛並みのいい馬が二頭繋がれていた。乗り込むと、小さな鉄格子つきのドアが 

バタンと閉ざされ、出発した。馬車には僕と同じことをしでかしたとして逮捕された少年達が他にも何人か乗っていた。 

[文法] 

the cell in which they had kept me all night 

彼らが一晩私を閉じ込めた独房(in which / they had) 

for doing the same thing I had done 

私がしたことと同じことをしたという理由で(thing I had done) 

 

The Waifs' Home was an old building which had apparently formerly been used for another purpose. It was located in the country opposite a great big dairy farm where hundreds of cows, bulls, calves and a few horses were standing. Some were eating, and some prancing around like they wanted to tell somebody, anybody, how good they felt. The average square would automatically say those animals were all loco, to be running like that, but for me they wanted to express themselves as being very happy, gay, and contented.  

少年孤児院は古い建物だ。あきらかに、かつては別の目的で使われていたようだった。少年孤児院があるのは町の郊外で、向かいにあるのが大きな酪農場だ。ここには乳牛、肉牛、仔牛が沢山いた。馬も数等いた。草を喰むのもいれば、楽しい気分を皆にアピールしたいのか?と思うくらい跳ね回るのもいた。これらの様子は、風情のわからない人から見れば、ただの奇行なのだろう。でも僕には、幸福感や躍動感や満足感を表現したがっているように見えた。 

[文法] 

The average square would automatically say those animals were all loco, to be running like that 

人並みの野暮な人なら何も考えずこの動物たちはこんなふうに走り回るなんて頭がおかしいと言うかもしれない(would say / to be running) 

 

When I got out of the wagon with the other boys the first thing I noticed was several large trees standing before the building. A very lovely odor was swinging across my nostrils.  

"What flowers are those that smell so good?" I asked. 

"Honeysuckles," was the answer.  

I fell in love with them, and I'm ready to get a whiff of them any time.  

他の子達と共に馬車を降りると、まず、高い木が数本、建物の前にあるのが目に飛び込んできた。とても良い香りが鼻のあたりに漂っていた。 

「この花、いい香りですね。何ていうんですか?」 

スイカズラというんだ」 

僕はこの花が大好きになった。今はいつもこの花の香を楽しんでいる。 

[文法] 

several large trees standing before the building 

建物の前に立っている数本の巨木(standing) 

 

The inmates were having their lunch. We walked down a long corridor leading to the mess hall where a long line of boys was seated eating white beans with out rice out of tin plates. They gave me the rooky greeting saying, "Welcome, newcomer. Welcome to your new home." I was too depressed to answer. When I sat down at the end of the table I saw a plate full of beans being passed in my direction. In times that I didn't have a care in the world I would have annihilated those beans. But this time I only pushed them away. I did the same thing for several days. The keepers, Mr. and Mrs. Jones and Mr. Alexander and Mr. Peter Davis, saw me refuse these meals, but they did not say anything about it. On the fourth day I was so hungry I was first at the table. Mr. Jones and his colleagues gave me a big laugh. I replied with a sheepish grin. I did not share their sense of humor; it did not blend with mine.  

中に入ると、昼食の時間だった。長い廊下が会食堂まで続いていた。会食堂では少年達が長机に並んで座り、白豆(白米なし)の料理をブリキの皿で食べていた。皆、僕達新入りに挨拶してくれた「ようこそ、新しい友よ、ようこそ、新しい家へ」。僕は気持ちが塞がっていたので返事を返せなかった。テーブルの端の席につくと、山盛りに豆が盛り付けられた皿が僕の方に回ってくるのが見えた。心配事がなにもない時だったら、全部平らげていただろう。でもその時は、拒否してしまった。このやり取りが数日間続いた。監察官の、ジョーンズ先生夫妻、アレクサンダー先生、ピーター・デイビス先生は、僕が食事を拒否するのを見ていたが、何も言わなかった。4日目、さすがにお腹が空いてしまい、真っ先に席についた。ジョーンズ先生達はそんな僕を見て大笑いした。僕はきまり悪そうに笑ってみせた。先生達の笑いに付き合う気はなかった。 

[文法] 

I saw a plate full of beans being passed in my drection 

私は豆でいっぱいの皿が私の方へ回さられてくるのを見た(saw a plate being passed) 

I would have annihilated those beans 

私はこれらの豆を平らげていただろう(would have annihilated) 

 

The keepers were all colored. Mr. Jones, a young man who had recently served in the cavalry, drilled us every morning in the court in front of the Waifs' Home, and we were taught the manual of arms with wooden guns.  

Mr. Alexander taught the boys how to do carpentry, how to garden and how to build camp fires. Mr. Peter Davis taught music and gave vocational training. Each boy had the right to choose the vocation which interested him.  

監察官の先生方は、皆有色人種だった。男の方のジョーンズ先生は、まだ若く、僕が来るつい最近まで兵役で騎兵隊に所属していた。毎朝少年孤児院の園庭で、木製のダミー銃を使い軍事教練を担当した。 

アレクサンダー先生は大工、園芸、野営を担当。ピーター・デイビス先生は、音楽と職業訓練を担当。子供達はそれぞれ、自分が興味のあるものを選ぶことができた。 

 

Quite naturally I would make a bee line to Mr. Davis and his music. Music has been in my blood from the day I was born. Unluckily at first I did not get on very well with Mr. Davis because he did not like the neighborhood I came from. He thought that only the toughest kids came from Liberty and Perdido Streets. They were full of honky-tonks, toughs and fancy women. Furthermore, the Fisk School had a bad reputation. Mr. Davis thought that since I had been raised in such bad company I must also be worthless. From the start he gave me a very hard way to go, and I kept my distance. One day I broke an unimportant rule, and he gave me fifteen hard lashes on the hand. After that I was really scared of him for a long time.  

至極当然だが、僕はデイビス先生の音楽の授業を取ろうと思った。音楽は生まれたときから僕に染み付いていると言ってよかったくらいだ。不運なことに、最初僕はデイビス先生と反りが悪かった。というのも、彼は僕の家の近所のことを良く思っていなかったのだ。リバティー通りやパーディド通りあたりからくるのは悪い連中ばかりだと考えていた。確かにその地区は、安酒場がひしめき、ヤクザものやあばずれがウロウロしていた。加えて我が母校フィスクスクールは悪名高い学校だった。デイビス先生にしてみれば、そんな酷いところで育った僕も、きっとロクデナシだと思ったのだろう。もう端から彼は僕にきつく当たり、僕も彼とは距離を置いた。ある日僕は些細な約束事を守れなかったのだが、手に15回も鞭打ちを受けてしまった。以来長い間、彼を恐れるようになってしまった。 

 

Our life was regulated by bugle calls. A kid blew a bugle for us to get up, to go to bed and to come to meals. The last call was the favorite with us all. Whether they were cutting trees a mile away or building a fire under the great kettle in the yard to scald our dirty clothes, the boys would hot foot it back to the Home when they heard the mess call. I envied the bugler because he had more chances to use his instrument than anyone else.  

少年孤児院での生活は、信号ラッパで合図がなされていた。ラッパ手の子が起床、就寝、食事の合図を出すのだ。食事の合図は僕達みんなが待ち焦がれるものだった。1マイル先で伐採中でも、園庭で洗濯用に大釜の火起こし中でも、食事の合図で皆建物の方へすっ飛んでいった。僕はラッパ手の子が羨ましかった。誰よりも楽器に触っていられるからだ。 

[文法] 

he had more chances to use his instrument than anyone else 

彼は他の誰よりも楽器を使う機会があった(more than anyone else) 

 

When the orchestra practiced with Mr. Davis, who was a good teacher, I listened very carefully, but I did not dare go near the band though I wanted to in the worst way. I was afraid Mr. Davis would bawl me out or give me a few more lashes. He made me feel he hated the ground I walked on, so I would sit in a corner and listen, enjoying myself immensely.  

楽団が練習中はデイビス先生が指導していた。先生は優れた指導者だった。僕はじっと耳を凝らして聞いていた。本当は近くに寄って聞きたくてたまらなかったが、敢えてそうしなかった。デイビス先生が怒鳴りつけるか、また2・3発叩かれるのではないかと怖かったのだ。僕は勝手に、彼はきっと僕と同じ床を歩くのも嫌なんじゃないか、と思い込み、練習室の端の方に座って聴いていた。それでもものすごく楽しかった。 

[文法] 

Mr. Davis, who was a good teacher 

デイビス先生というとても良い指導者( , who) 

enjoying myself immensely一人大いに楽しみながら(enjoying) 

 

The little brass band was very good, and Mr. Davis made the boys play a little of every kind of music. I had never tried to play the cornet, but while listening to the band every day I remembered Joe Oliver, Bolden and Bunk Johnson. And I had an awful urge to learn the cornet. But Mr. Davis hated me. Furthermore I did not know how long they were going to keep me at the Home. The judge had condemned me for an in definite period which meant that I would have to stay there until he set me free or until some important white person vouched for me and for my mother and father. That was my only chance of getting out of the Waifs' Home fast. So I had plenty of time to listen to the band and wish I could learn to play the cornet.  

その小さなブラスバンドはなかなか上手だった。デイビス先生は短い曲を色々と種類を揃えて子供達に演奏させていた。その頃僕はまだコルネットを吹いたことはなかったが、毎日練習を聴いているうちに、ジョー・オリバーやバディ・ボールデン、バンク・ジョンソンなどのことを思い出した。そして僕は、コルネットを習いたくてたまらなくなった。でもデイビス先生は僕のことを嫌っている。加えて、僕の勾留期間がわからなかった。判事からは無期限の勾留だと言われていた。僕が釈放されるには、判事が許可するか、誰か町の白人の顔役が、僕と両親に保証人になると申し出てくれないといけない。少年孤児院から出るにはそれしかなかった。だから時間はたっぷりあるので、とにかくバンドをよく聞き、コルネットを習いたいという気持ちを募らせていった。 

[文法] 

The judge had condemned me for an in definite period which meant that I would have to stay there until he set me free 

判事は私に無期限の勾留を告げていたが、これは判事が許可するまで私はそこに居なければならないということを意味していた 

(had condemned / which / would have to stay) 

 

Finally, through Mr. Jones, I got a chance to sing in the school. My first teacher was Miss Spriggins. Then I was sent to Mrs. Vigne, who taught the higher grades.  

やっとのことで、ジョーンズ先生のはからいで、歌を歌うチャンスが巡ってきた。担当はスプリギンス先生という、高学年を教えている先生のところへ送られた。 

 

As the days rolled by, Mr. Davis commenced to lighten up on his hatred of me. Occasionally I would catch his eye meeting with mine. I would turn away, but he would catch them again and give me a slight smile of approval which would make me feel good in side. From then on whenever Mr. Davis spoke to me or smiled I was happy. Gee, what a feeling that com ing from him! I was beginning to adapt myself to the place, and since I had to stay there for a long time I thought I might as well adjust myself. I did.  

月日が経った頃、デイビス先生が偶然ある時から、僕の考えていることに気づいたようだった。時々先生とは目が合ったが僕は目をそらしていた。すると先生のほうから目線を合わせようとし、そしてこちらに微笑みかけてくるのだ。僕は嬉しい気持ちになった。それからというもの、僕は先生が話しかけてきたり、微笑みかけてくれるのが嬉しくなった。この気分、何と言い表したらいいのか!僕は少年孤児院での生活に自分を合わせていこうとし始めた。どうせ時間は沢山あるのだから、そうしたほうがいいと思ったし、実際にそうした。 

 

Six months went by. We were having supper of black molasses and a big hunk of bread which after all that time seemed just as good as a home cooked chicken dinner. Just as we were about to get up from the table Mr. Davis slowly came over and stopped by me.  

"Louis Armstrong," he said, "how would you like to join our brass band?' '  

I was so speechless and so surprised I just could not answer him right away. To make sure that I had understood him he repeated his question,  

"Louis Armstrong, I asked if you would like to join our brass band." 

"I certainly would, Mr. Davis. I certainly would,” I stammered.  

半年がたった。僕達は食事をとっていた。黒糖蜜と大きなパンで、当時僕が家で作っていた鶏肉料理にも負けない美味しい夕食だった。食事を終えて立ち上がろうとしたとき、デイビス先生がゆっくりとこちらへ来ると、僕のそばに立ちこういった。 

ルイ・アームストロング君、私達のブラスバンドに入らないかね?」 

僕は言葉を失い、そして驚き、すぐに返事の言葉が出てこなかった。 

僕が理解したかを確認するため、彼はもう一度訊いてきた。 

ルイ・アームストロング君、どうかね、入ってみないか、私達のブラスバンドに?」 

「勿論です、デイビス先生、勿論です」僕はしどろもどろながら答えた。 

[文法] 

I was so speechless I just could not answer him right away 

私は言葉を失ってしまい、すぐに彼に返事ができなくなった 

(so [that] I could not) 

 

He patted me on the back and said: "Wash up and come to rehearsal," While I was washing I could not think of anything but of my good luck in finally getting a chance to play the cornet. I got soap in my eyes but didn't pay any attention to it. I thought of what the gang would say when they saw me pass through the neighborhood blowing a cornet, I already pictured myself playing with all the power and endurance of a Bunk, Joe or Bolden. When I was washed I rushed to the rehearsal. 

彼は僕の背中をポンとはたくと、こう言った「入浴が済んだら合奏練習場に来なさい」。入浴中、待ちに待ったコルネットを吹けるチャンスのことで頭がいっぱいだった。石鹸が目に入ったってヘッチャラだった。街の連中が近所をパレードでコルネットを吹きながら歩く僕を見たら、なんと言うだろう。既に頭の中では、バンク、ジョー、あるいはボールデンのようににガンガン吹きまくる僕自身の姿を描いていた。 

[文法] 

I could not think of anything but of my good luck 

私は自分の幸運のことしか考えられなくなった(not but) 

 

"Here I am, Mr. Davis."  

To my surprise he handed me a tambourine, the little thing you tap with your fingers like a miniature drum. So that was the end of my beautiful dream! But I did not say a word. Taking the tambourine, I started to whip it in rhythm with the band. Mr. Davis was so impressed he immediately changed me to the drums. He must have sensed that I had the beat he was looking for.  

デイビス先生、失礼します。」 

僕は驚いた。渡された楽器はタンバリンだった。タンバリンとは、小太鼓をうんと小さくして、手で持ち叩いて演奏する楽器だ。楽しい夢が覚めてしまった!でも僕は、黙ってタンバリンを受け取ると、合奏に入ってリズムを取り始めた。デイビス先生は感心すると、直ちに僕の担当をドラムスに変更した。僕のリズム感が彼の期待に応えるだけのものだったのだろう。 

[文法] 

Taking the tambourine, I started to whip it in rhythm with the band 

タンバリンを受け取ると、私はバンドに入ってリズムに合わせて叩き始めた(Taking) 

 

They were playing At the Animals' Ball, a tune that was very popular in those days and which had a break right in the channel. When the break came I made it a real good one and a fly one at that. All the boys yelled "Hooray for Louis Armstrong." Mr. Davis nodded with approval which was all I needed. His approval was all important for any boy who wanted a musical career.  

バンドは「動物の舞踏会」という曲を練習中だった。当時大人気で、僕にとっては自分をアピールする絶好の機会となる曲だ。僕はこのチャンスをモノにし、そつなくやってのけた。バンドメンバー達から「やるじゃないか、ルイ・アームストロング!」と歓声が上がった。デイビス先生は合格だと言わんばかりに首を縦に振った。僕はこれを待っていた。彼から合格をもらうことは、ここで音楽をやりたい子達にとって、いちばん大事なことなのだ。 

[文法] 

a tune that was very popular in those days  

当時大人気な曲(that) 

 

"You are very good, Louis," he said. "But I need an alto player. How about trying your luck?"  

"Anything you like, Mr. Davis,”  I answered with all the confidence in the world.  

He handed me an alto. I had been singing for a number of years and my instinct told me that an alto takes a part in a band same as a baritone or tenor in a quartet. I played my part on the alto very well.  

彼は言った「君の演奏はバツグンだ。ところで今アルトホルンを吹く子が必要なんだ。どうだ、やってみるかね?」。 

「何でも言ってください、デイビス先生。」僕は自信満々に答えた。 

彼は僕にアルトホルンを手渡した。僕は何年も歌はやっていたので、バンドの中のアルトホルンといえば、地元のアカペラ4人組のバリトンかテナーだろう、と本能的に理解した。僕はアルトホルンもバッチリこなしてみせた。 

[文法] 

I had been singing for a years and my instinct told me 

私はそれ以前に何年間も歌っていて、私の本能が語りかけた 

(had been / told) 

 

As soon as the rehearsal was over, the bugle blew for bed. All the boys fell into line and were drilled up to the dormitory by the band. In the dormitory we could talk until nine o'clock when the lights were turned out and everybody had to be quiet and go to sleep. 

Nevertheless we used to whisper in low voices taking care we did not attract the attention of the keepers who slept downstairs near Mr. and Mrs. Jones. Somebody would catch a licking if we talked too loud and brought one of the keepers upstairs.  

合奏練習が終わると、ラッパ手による就寝の合図が鳴り響いた。皆一列に並んで一団となって宿舎へ向かった。宿舎では僕達は、消灯時刻の9時までは友達同士おしゃべりが許された。9時をすぎると明かりが消えて、皆黙って就寝しなくてはならなかった。だが僕達は、下の階のジョーンズ先生夫妻の部屋の隣りにいる宿直の先生達に気づかれないよう、小声でおしゃべりをしたものだった。声が大きくて宿直の先生が上がってきてしまうと、誰かが鞭打ちを受けることになってしまうからだ。 

 

In the morning when the bugle blew I Can't Get 'Em Up we jumped out of bed and dressed as quickly as possible because our time was limited. They knew just how long it should take, they'd been in the business so long. If any one was late he had to have a good ex cuse or he would have to hold out his hand for a lashing.  

朝になり、ラッパ手が「みんなが起きてこない」というメロディを吹くと、僕達は飛び起きて急いで着替えをした。時間が限られているのだ。その後やることを考えて、着替えにどのくらい時間を割くか、心得ていた。もし一人でも遅刻したら、その子は言い訳で押し切るか、観念して手を差し出し鞭打ちを受けなければならなかった。 

 

It was useless to try to run away from the Waifs' Home. Anyone who did was caught in less than a week's time. One night while we were asleep a boy tied about half a dozen sheets together. He greased his body so that he could slip through the wooden bars around the dormitory. He let himself down to the ground and disappeared. None of us understood how he had succeeded in doing it, and we were scared to death that we would be whipped for having helped him. On the contrary, nothing happened. All the keepers said after his disappearance was: 

"He'll be back soon." 

孤児院から脱走しようとしてもムダだ。逃げても一週間と経たずに捕まってしまう。或夜のことだった。僕達が眠っている間に、一人がシーツを6枚ほど結んでロープのようにした。体に油を塗って、宿舎の周りにある木製格子の間を滑り抜けられるようにした。地上に降り立つと、姿を消した。どうやって見つからずに済ませたのかは、誰もわからなかった。僕達は怖くなった。脱出を助けたとして鞭打ちを受けるのではないかと思ったのだ。実際は何も起きなかった。彼が居なくなった後、先生達が言ったのは、ただ一言、 

「彼は程なく戻ってくるだろう。」 

[文法] 

He greased his body so that he could slip through the wooden bars 

彼は木製格子の間を滑り抜けられるように体に油を塗った(so that) 

 

They were right. He was caught and brought back in less than a week. He was all nasty and dirty from sleeping under old houses and wherever else he could and eating what little he could scrounge. The police had caught him and turned him over to the Juvenile Court.  

Not a word was said to him during the first day he was back. We all wondered what they were going to do to him, and we thought that perhaps they were going to give him a break. When the day was over the bugle boy sounded taps, and we all went up to the dormitory. The keepers waited until we were all undressed and ready to put on our pajamas. 

先生達の言った通りになった。彼は1週間もしないうちに、捕まって連れ戻された。逃亡中、彼は廃屋などあらゆるところで眠り、口にできるものはどんなかけらも漁って食べ、見窄らしく汚らしい姿になっていた。警察が身柄を確保し、少年裁判所へ護送していた。 

彼が戻った初日、誰も彼に言葉をかける者はいなかった。彼はどうなってしまうのだろう、今は猶予が与えられているのだろうか、と僕達は勘ぐった。その日の終わり、ラッパ手が就寝の合図をしたので、僕達は全員宿舎に集合した。先生達は僕達全員が、服を脱いでパジャマを着る準備ができるのを待った。 

[文法] 

He was all nasty from sleeping under old houses and eating what little he could scrounge 

彼は廃屋で寝たり漁れるものは何でも食い漁り見窄らしかった(sleeping and eating) 

 

At that moment Mr. Jones shouted:  

"Hold it, boys."  

Then he looked at the kid who had run away.  

"I want everyone to put on their pajamas except that young man. He ran away, and he has to pay for it." 

その時、ジョーンズ先生が叫んだ 

「みんな待て」 

すると彼は、脱走した子の方を見た。 

「あの若造以外全員パジャマを着るように。彼は脱走した。これから罰を与える。」 

[文法] 

he looked at the kid who had run away 

彼は脱走した少年を見た(who had run) 

 

We all cried, but it was useless. Mr. Jones called the four strongest boys in the dormitory to help him. He made two of them hold the culprit's legs and the other two his arms in such a way that he could only move his buttocks. To these writhing naked buttocks Mr. Jones gave one hundred and five lashes. All of the boys hollered, but the more we hollered the harder he hit. It was a terrible thing to watch the poor kid suffer. He could not sit down for over two weeks.  

I saw several fools try to run away, but after what happened to that first boy I declined the idea.  

僕達は全員悲鳴を上げたが、ムダだった。ジョーンズ先生は宿舎に居た子達のうち、一番力が強い4人に手伝うよう指示。2人が脱走した子の両足を、残りの2人が両腕を掴み、尻だけが動かせる状態になった。この何とも哀れなむき出しの尻に、ジョーンズ先生は105回鞭打ちをした。僕達は皆叫んだ。でも先生は、僕達が叫ぶほど、更に強く鞭を打った。この気の毒な子が苦しむ姿を見るのは恐ろしい思いがした。彼はその後2週間以上、腰を下ろすことができなくなってしまった。 

その後も懲りない子達が脱走を試みたが、僕は最初のこの子に起きたことを見て、脱走しようなどという考えは捨てた。 

[訳] 

the more we hollered the harder he hit. 

私達が叫べば叫ぶほど彼は更に強く打った(the more the harder) 

 

One day we were out on the railroad tracks picking up worn-out ties which the railroad company gave to the Waifs' Home for fire wood. Two boys were needed to carry each tie. In our bunch was a boy of about eighteen from a little Louisiana town called Houma. You could tell he was a real country boy by the way he murdered the King's English. We called him Houma after his home town.  

別の日のこと。僕達は、薪用にと少年孤児院に対して鉄道会社が寄付してくれる、線路の古くなった枕木を拾い集めに線路の所にいた。1本の枕木を運ぶのには2人がかりだった。僕がペアを組んだのは、18歳くらいの子で、ルイジアナ州の小さな町フーマ出身だった。ちゃんとした英語が全く話せない子で、すぐに地方のド田舎出身とわかった。僕達は彼のことを、出身の町にちなんで「フーマ」と呼んでいた。 

[文法] 

we were out on the railroad tracks picking up worn-out ties 

私達は古くなった枕木を拾い集めるべく外の鉄道のところに居た(picking) 

 

We were on our way back to the Home, which was about a mile down the road. Among us was a boy about eighteen or nineteen years old named Willie Davis and he was the fastest runner in the place. Any kid who thought he could outrun Willie Davis was crazy. But the country boy did not know what a good runner Davis was.  

帰る段になった。孤児院までは1マイル道を下ったところだった。僕達の一団の中に、年の頃なら18、19歳といったところのウィリー・デイビスと言う子がいた。彼は孤児院では一番足が速かった。ウィリー・デイビスにかけっこで勝とうなどと言うアホはいなかった。しかしこのフーマはデイビスが俊足の持ち主だと走らなかったのだ。 

[文法] 

a boy about eighteen or nineteen years old named Willie Davis 

ウィリー・デイビスという名の18、19歳くらいの少年(named) 

 

About a half mile from the Home we heard one of the ties drop. Before we realized what had happened we saw Houma sprinting down the road, but he was headed in the wrong direction. When he was about a hundred yards away Mr. Alexander saw him and called Willie Davis.  

"Go get him, Willie."  

少年孤児院まで後半分というところで、枕木の一本が落ちる音がした。何が起きたのか思っていたところで、フーマが道を駆けていくのが見えた。しかしそれは孤児院の方向ではなかった。100ヤードくらい行ったところで、アレクサンダー先生がフーマを見て、ウィリー・デイビスを呼んだ。 

「ヤツを捕まえてきなさい、ウィリー。」 

[文法] 

Before we realized what had happened we saw Houma sprinting down the road 

何が起きていたのか気づく前に、私達はフーマが道を疾走してゆくのを見た 

(what had happen / saw Houma sprinting) 

 

Willie was after Houma like a streak of lightning while we all stood open-mouthed, wondering if Willie would be able to catch up. Houma speeded up a little when he saw that Willie was after him, but he was no match for the champ and Willie soon caught him.  

Here is the pay-off.  

ウィリーは稲光のようにフーマの後を追いかけた。この間僕達は呆気にとられ、ウィリーが追いつくかどうか見守った。フーマはウィリーがあとから追いかけてくるのを見るとスピードを上げた。しかし彼は敵うはずもなく、間もなくウィリーに捕まってしまった。 

これで彼はお仕置きとなった。 

[文法] 

wondering if Willie would be able to catch up 

ウィリーが追いつくことができるかどうかと思いながら 

(wondering if Willie would) 

 

When Willie slapped his hand on Houma's shoulder and stopped him, Willie said: "Come on kid. You gotta go back."  

"What's the matter?" Houma said. "Ah wasn't gwine no whars."  

After the five hundred lashes Houma did not try to run away again. Finally some important white folks for whom Houma's parents worked sent for the kid and had him shipped back home with an honorable discharge. We got a good laugh out of that one. "Ah wasn't gwine no whars."  

ウィリーはフーマの肩をポンとはたき、静止を促してこういった「おいお前、戻れ」。 

フーマは言った「なんだんべぇさ?おいは、どごぬもいきゃあせぇへんずら?」 

フーマは500回鞭打ちを受け、その後逃亡しようとはしなくなった。やがて、フーマの両親の勤め先の関係者である大物の白人の人達がやってきて、今度はちゃんとした手続きの元、釈放され家へと帰っていった。僕達は大笑いして言った。 

「おいは、どこぬもいきゃあせぇへんずら?」 

[文法] 

some important white folks for whom Houma's parents worked 

フーマの両親が勤めていたある白人の大物達(for whom) 

 

As time went on I commenced being the most popular boy in the Home. Seeing how much Mr. Davis liked me and the amount of time he gave me, the boys began to warm up to me and take me into their confidence.  

月日は流れ、僕は孤児院で一番の人気者になり始めていた。デイビス先生が僕のことを気に入ってくれて、色々とチャンスを与えてくれるのを他の子達は見ていて、彼らは皆僕のことを好きになってくれて、心の内を話してくれるようになった。 

[文法] 

Seeing how much Mr. Davis liked me and the amount of time he gave me, 

デイビス先生が僕をどれだけ気に入ってくれているか、そしてどれほど沢山彼が僕に機会を与えているかをみて(Seeing) 

 

One day the young bugler's mother and father, who had gotten his release, came to take him home. The minute he left Mr. Davis gave me his place. I took up the bugle at once and began to shine it up. The other bugler had never shined the instrument and the brass was dirty and green. The kids gave me a big hand when they saw the gleaming bright instrument instead of the old filthy green one.  

ある日、ラッパ吹きの子の両親がやってきた。まだ幼いその子は釈放が決まっていた。2人はその子を連れて家に帰った。直後にデイビス先生は僕を後任に当てがった。僕は直ちに楽器を手にすると、ピカピカにしようと磨き始めた。前の子は楽器の掃除などしたことがなかったのだろう、汚れて青錆が出ていた。みるみるピカピカになってゆくのを見て、他のメンバーたちも手伝ってくれた。 

[文法] 

the young bugler's mother and father, who had gotten his release, came to take him home. 

その年端もゆかぬラッパ手のこの両親は、彼の釈放の知らせを受けていて、彼を連れて家に帰るために来た( , who had gotten) 

 

I felt real proud of my position as bugler. I would stand very erect as I would put the bugle nonchalantly to my lips and blow real mellow tones. The whole place seemed to change. Satisfied with my tone Mr. Davis gave me a cornet and taught me how to play Home, Sweet Home. Then I was in seventh heaven. Unless I was dreaming, my ambition had been realized.  

僕はラッパ手になれて本当に誇りに思った。僕は逸る気持ちをぐっと抑えて、落ち着いて楽器を唇にあてがうと、しっかりと柔らかい音色で吹いてみせた。その場の空気が変わった。デイビス先生はこの音色に満足してくれて、僕にコルネットを渡し、「埴生の宿」の吹き方を教えてくれた。天にも昇る心地だった。夢じゃない、やっと僕の願いがかなったのだ。 

[文法] 

Satisfied with my tone Mr. Davis gave me a cornet 

私の音色に満足したので、デイビス先生は私にコルネットを渡した(Satisfied) 

 

Every day I practiced faithfully on the lesson Mr. Davis gave me. I became so good on the cornet that one day Mr. Davis said to me:  

"Louis, I am going to make you leader of the band." 

I jumped straight into the air, with Mr. Davis watching me, and ran to the mess room to tell the boys the good news. They were all rejoiced with me. Now at last I was not only a musician but a band leader! Now I would get a chance to go out in the streets and see Mayann and the gang that hung around Liberty and Perdido Streets. The band often got a chance to play at a private picnic or join one of the frequent parades through the streets of New Orleans covering all parts of the city, Uptown, Back o' Town, Front o' Town, Downtown. The band was even sent to play in the West End and Spanish Fort, our popular summer resorts, and also at Milenburg and Little Woods.  

デイビス先生のコルネットのレッスンを、僕は毎日真剣に受けて、腕を上げていった。そしてある日、先生はこう言った。 

「ルイ、君をバンドリーダーにすることにした。」 

僕は跳び上がって喜んだ。デイビス先生も見ていた。僕は食堂へ行き、この良い知らせを仲間にも伝えた。皆喜んでくれた。とうとう僕はミュージシャンであり、そしてバンドリーターにもなったのだ。これで僕は、街へ出る機会ができた。リバティー通りやパーディド通りでメイアンや街の連中の顔を見ることができる。個人のピクニック、ニューオーリンズ中のストリート:アップタウン、バックオータウン、フロントオータウン、ダウンタウンでよく行われるパレードなど、このバンドには演奏の機会が結構あった。バンドはウェスト・エンド、僕達の間で人気の夏の娯楽エリアであるスパニッシュフォート、それからミルンバーグやリトルウッズにまでも派遣されることがあった。 

[文法] 

I became so good on the cornet that one day Mr. Davis said to me 

私はコルネットがとても上手になったのでデイビス先生が私に言った(so that) 

 

The band's uniform consisted of long white pants turned up to look like knickers, black easy-walkers, or sneakers as they are now called, thin blue gabardine coats, black stockings and caps with black and white bands which looked very good on the young musicians. To stand out as the leader of the band I wore cream colored pants, brown stockings, brown easy-walkers and a cream colored cap.  

バンドのユニフォームは、白のズボンの裾を膝のあたりまでまくりあげ、黒のイージーウォーカ(スニーカー)、青の薄手のギャバジンコート(目の細かい綾織の上着)、黒のストッキング、黒と白のバンドのつい 

たキャップ帽と、子供のミュージシャンらしいものだった。バンドリーターは目立つように、クリーム色のズボン、茶色のストッキングとイージーウォーカー、そしてクリーム色のキャップ帽となっていた。 

[文法] 

white pants turned up to look like knickers 

ニッカポッカのように見えるようまくりあげたズボン(pants turned up to look) 

 

In those days some of the social clubs paraded all day long. When the big bands consisting of old-timers complained about such a tiresome job, the club members called on us.  

"Those boys," they said, "will march all day long and won't squawk one bit."  

They were right. We were so glad to get a chance to walk in the street that we did not care how long we paraded or how far. The day we were engaged by the Merry-Go-Round Social Club we walked all the way to Carrolton, a distance of about twenty-five miles. Playing like mad, we loved every foot of the trip.  

当時は社交クラブの中には、一日中パレードを行うところがあった。メンバーに年配者が混じっていると、こういった疲れることに対しては不平が上がり、僕達にお声がかかるのだ。 

彼らが言うのは「あの子達は一日中行進したって文句は言わないさ」。 

彼らが言うのは正しかった。僕達は表の通りを歩けることが嬉しくて、パレードがどんなに長くてもどんなに遠くても気にならなかった。メリーゴーラウンドクラブから依頼のあった日には、一日がかりで約25マイル離れたキャロルトンまで歩いた。死にものぐるいで演奏しながらも、一歩一歩を楽しむように行進した。 

[文法] 

Playing like mad, we loved every foot of the trip 

気違いのように演奏しながら、私達は行程の一歩一歩を楽しんだ(Playing) 

 

The first day we paraded through my old neigh borhood everybody was gathered on the sidewalks to see us pass. All the whores, pimps, gamblers, thieves and beggars were waiting for the band because they knew that Dipper, Mayann's son, would be in it. But they had never dreamed that I would be playing the cornet, blowing it as good as I did. They ran to wake up mama, who was sleeping after a night job, so she could see me go by. Then they asked Mr. Davis if they could give me some money. He nodded his head with approval, not thinking that the money would amount to very much. But he did not know that sporting crowd. Those sports gave me so much that I had to borrow the hats of several other boys to hold it all. I took in enough to buy new uniforms and new instru ments for everybody who played in the band.  

The instruments we had been using were old and badly battered.  

僕の住んでいる界隈を初めてパレードする日、皆が僕達を見ようと道端に集まってくれた。ウリのお姉さんたちも、ポン引きのお兄さんたちも、賭博師のおじさんたちも、泥棒やホームレスまでもが、バンドが来るのを待ってくれていた。みんなメイアンの息子のディッパーがバンドにいるのを知っていたからだ。でもまさか、その僕がコルネットを、それもそこそこ吹くとは、夢にも思わなかっただろう。皆、寝ている母を起こしに行ってくれた。母は夜勤後休んでいたから、僕を見逃さないように、と気を利かせてくれたのだ。皆デイビス先生のところへ行って、僕におひねりをと申し出てくれた。先生は受けてくれたが、とんでもない額になるとは思わなかったのだろう。先生は彼らの素性は全く知らなかったのである。彼らが寄せてくれた大きなお金で、バンド全員分のユニフォームと楽器を新調することができた。今まで使っていた楽器は古くなり傷みも酷かったのだ。 

[文法] 

they had never dreamed that I would be playing the cornet, blowing it as good as I did 

彼らは私がコルネットを、上手に吹いているとは夢にも思っていなかった 

(had never dreamed I would be / blowing) 

 

This increased my popularity at the Home, and Mr. Davis gave me permission to go into town by myself to visit Mayann. He and Mr. and Mrs. Jones probably felt that this was the best way to show their gratitude.  

この一件で少年孤児院での僕の評判は上がり、デイビス先生は僕に、メイアンとの面会のため一人で外出する許可を出してくれた。デイビス先生と、そしてジョーンズ先生夫妻は、これが先日のパレードでの寄付金に対する感謝を表すベストの方法だと考えたのだろう。 

[文法] 

permission to go into town by myself to visit Mayann 

メイアンを訪ねるために一人で街へ出る許可(to go / to visit) 

 

One day we went to play at a white folks' picnic at Spanish Fort near West End. There were picnics there every Sunday for which string orchestras were hired or occasionally a brass band. When all the bands were busy we used to be called on.  

On that day we decided to take a swim during the intermission since the cottage at which we were playing was on the edge of the water. We were swimming and having a lot of fun when Jimmy's bathing trunks fell off. While we were hurrying to fish them out of the water a white man took a shot gun off the rack on the porch. As Jimmy was struggling frantically to pull his trunks on again the white man aimed the shot gun at him and said:  

"You black sonofabitch, cover up that black ass of yours or I'll shoot."  

We were scared stiff, but the man and his party broke out laughing and it all turned out to be a huge joke. We were not much good the rest of that day, but we weren't so scared that we could not eat all the spaghetti and beer they gave us when they were through eating. It was good.  

ある日のこと、僕達は、ウェスト・エンドの近くにあるスパニッシュフォートでの、白人さん達のピクニックでの依頼演奏に行った。このエリアでは毎週日曜日にピクニックがあり、弦楽オケや、時にはブラスバンドが演奏依頼を受けていた。どこもスケジュールが合わないときには、僕達に声がかかった。 

その日、ステージとなったコテージが岸辺にあったので、休憩時間中に泳ごうということになった。泳いで遊んで楽しんでいる最中のこと、ジミーの海パンが脱げてしまった。僕達は皆大あらわで探していると、一人の白人の男性が玄関の棚からショットガンを取ってきた。ジミーが必死に海パンを履こうとしていると、その男性がショットガンを構えてこう言った。 

「このバカ黒人、そのケツ仕舞え、でないと撃ち殺すぞ」 

僕達は震え上がった。でもその男性と仲間が大笑いして、冗談きつかったかな、と言った。この一件の後、僕達はその日は落ち着いていられなかった。といってもそんなにビビっていたわけではなく、食事の時間にスパゲティだの炭酸ドリンクだの、美味しく平らげることができた。 

[文法] 

the cottage at which we were playing 

僕達が演奏したコテージ(at which) 

we weren't so scared that we could not eat all the spaghetti 

私達はスパゲティを全部食べることができなくなるほど怯えていたわけではなかった 

(not so scared that we could not eat all) 

 

Among the funny incidents that happened at the Home I will never forget the stunt Red Sun pulled off. He had been sent to the Home for stealing. It was a mania with him; he would steal everything which was not nailed down. Before I ever saw the Home he had served two or three terms there. He would be released, and two or three months later he would be back again to serve another term for stealing.  

After serving six months while I was at the Home he was paroled by the judge. Three months passed, and he was still out on the streets. We took it for granted that Red Sun had gone straight at last and we practically forgot all about him.  

少年孤児院では色々あったが、中でも忘れられないのが、レッド・サンがかましたハッタリだ。彼は窃盗の廉で少年孤児院に送られてきていた。彼はクセになっていたのだ。釘で打ち付けられていないものなら何でも失敬しようとした。僕がこの少年孤児院にやってくるまでに、彼は2・3回ここを入退所していた。釈放されても、また盗みを働いて、戻ってきてしまうのだ。 

僕が来てからのこと、入所6ヶ月目に彼は判事の判断で仮出所が認められた。出所後3ヶ月が経ったが、彼は戻ってきていない。今度こそ彼はまっすぐ社会復帰したのだ、これで僕達は彼のことを忘れてゆくのだろうと、当然思った。 

[文法] 

he would steal everything which was not nailed down 

彼は釘で打ち付けてないものは全て盗んだ(would / which) 

 

One day while Mr. Jones was drilling us in front of the Home we saw somebody coming down the road riding on a real beautiful horse. We all wondered who it could be. Mr. Jones stopped the drill and waited with us while we watched the horse and rider come towards us. To our amazement it was Red Sun. Above all he was riding bareback. We crowded around to tell how glad we were to see him looking so good and to admire his horse.  

ある日のこと、僕達はジョーンズ先生の園庭での軍事教練中に誰かが素晴らしい馬に乗ってこちらにやってくるのが目に入った。誰だろうと思った。ジョーンズ先生は教練を中断すると、僕達と一緒にその馬と騎乗している人が来るのを見た。何と驚いたことにレッド・サンだった。何より彼は鞍無しで騎乗していた。僕達は皆彼の周りに集まって口々に、彼が立派な姿で立派な馬に乗っているのを見れてよかったと言った。 

[文法] 

We crowded around to tell how glad we were to see him looking so good and to admire his horse 

私達は周りに群がり、彼が立派な様子を見れることを嬉しく思うといい、そして馬を褒めた(crowded to tell and to admire / to see him looking so good) 

 

"Where did you get that fine looking horse, Red?" Mr. Jones asked.  

Red, who was very ugly, gave a very pleasant smile.  

"I have been working," he said. "I had such a good job that I was able to buy the horse. What do you think of him?"  

Mr. Jones thought he was pretty and so did all the rest of us. Red poked his chest way out.  

He spent the whole day with us, letting us all take turns riding his horse. Oh, we had a ball! Red stayed for supper, the same as I did in later years, and when I blew the bugle for taps he mounted his fine horse and bade us all good-bye.  

"Ah'll see you-all soon," he said and he rode away as good as the Lone Ranger. After he had left, Red was the topic of conversation until the lights went out. We all went to sleep, saying how great olf Red Sun had become.  

ジョーンズ先生が言った「レッド、随分いい馬だが、どこで手に入れた?」 

レッドは醜男だったが、このときは実に嬉しそうにニッコリ笑った。 

彼は言った「ずっと働いてましたよ。それもかなりいい仕事で。それでこの馬買えたんですよ。どうです?」 

ジョーンズ先生は、いい馬だと言った。僕達も皆そう思った。彼は誇らしげに、立てた親指を胸に当てた。 

彼はその日は僕達と過ごし、僕達を代わる代わる馬に乗せてくれた。僕達は本当に楽しかった。レッドは夕食を一緒に食べていった。これは僕も後年そうしたことだ。そしてラッパ手から就寝の合図がなされると、彼は自分の素晴らしい馬にまたがり、僕達皆に別れを告げた。 

「じゃ、またな」彼はそう言うと、まるでローンレンジャーのように去っていった。彼が帰った後、消灯までの間僕達はレッドの話題で持ちきりだった。レッド・サンは立派になったと皆言いつつ、眠りについた。 

[文法] 

Red, who was very ugly, gave a very pleasant smile 

レッドはとても醜かったが、とても嬉しげな笑顔を浮かべた( , who) 

 

After dinner the next evening while we were looking out the windows we saw Mr. Alexander-he generally went to the Juvenile Court for delinquents -bring a new recruit into Mr. Jones' office. We wondered who it could be: it was Red Sun -bless my lamb -who had been arrested for stealing a horse.  

次の日の夕飯のとき、僕達は窓の外を見ると、アレクサンダー先生がいた。彼はいつも少年裁判所へ赴き、犯罪を起こした少年を連れてくるのだが、この時も新しい入所者をジョーンズ先生の部屋へ連れてきた。誰だろうと思ったら、何ということか、レッド・サンだ。馬泥棒で捕まったとのことだった。 

[文法] 

We wondered who it could be 

私達はそれが誰なのだろうと思った(who it could be) 

 

I saw plenty of miserable kids brought into the Home. One day a couple of small kids had been picked up in the streets of New Orleans covered with body lice and head lice. Out in the back yard there was an immense kettle which was used to boil up our dirty clothes. Those two kids were in such a filthy condition that we had to shave their heads and throw their clothes into the fire underneath the kettle.  

僕は気の毒な子達が沢山この少年孤児院に連れてこられるのを見た。ある日のこと、まだ年端のいかない子が2人、ニューオーリンズ市内の通りで保護された。この子達は体もシラミ、頭もシラミだらけだった。裏庭には僕達の汚れた衣服を煮沸洗浄する巨大な釜があった。この2人の子達はあまりにも汚かったので、頭髪を剃り落とし、着衣は釜を炊く火にくべてしまったほどだった。 

 

The Waifs' Home was surely a very clean place, and we did all the work ourselves. That's where I learned how to scrub floors, wash and iron, cook, make up beds, do a little of everything around the house. The first thing we did to a newcomer was to make him take a good shower, and his head and body were carefully examined to see that he did not bring any vermin into the Home. Every day we had to line up for inspection.  

少年孤児院は実に清潔な場所であり、僕達は皆、身の回りのことは全部自分達でやった。ここで僕は、床磨き、洗濯にアイロンがけ、料理、ベッドメイキング、家事の細かいことすべてできるようになった。新入りが来るとまず最初にその子には、しっかりとシャワーをさせ、身体検査・健康チェックをして病原菌を孤児院に持ち込ませないようにした。僕達は、並んで毎日健康チェックを受けなければならなかった。 

[文法] 

make him take a good shower 

彼にしっかりシャワーをさせる(make him take) 

 

Anyone whose clothes were not in proper condition was pulled out of line and made to fix them himself. Once a week we were given a physic, when we lined up in the morning, and very few of the boys were sick. The place was more like a health center or a boarding school than a boys' jail. We played all kinds of sports, and we turned out some mighty fine baseball players, swimmers and musicians. All in all I am proud of the days I spent at the Colored Waifs' Home for Boys. 

並んでいると服装検査があり、きちんとしていないと列から出されて、自分達で直させられた。朝の整列のとき、週に一度薬が処方された。だから病気になる子はほとんどいなかった。ここは少年院というよりは、健康センターであり、寄宿学校のようなところだった。僕達はあらゆるスポーツにも取り組んだ。卒業してから、野球選手や水泳選手、そしてミュージシャンとして活躍した者もいる。「有色少年のための孤児院」での日々は、何もかもが、今でも僕の誇りだ。