英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

「サッチモMy Life in New Orleans」を読む 第11回の2

In addition to Fate, Joe Howard and myself, the other members of Marable's band when I joined were Baby Dodds, drums; George (Pops) Foster, bass; David Jones, melophone; Johnny St. Cyr, banjo guitar; Boyd Atkins, swing violin, and another man whose name 1 have forgotten. Any kid interested in music would have appreciated playing with them, considering how we had to struggle to pay for lessons. Most of the time our parents could not pay fifty cents for a lesson. Things were hard in New Orleans in those days and we were lucky if we ate, let alone pay for lessons. In order to carry on at all we had to have the love of music in our bones.  

[訳] 

僕が加入した時点でのフェイト・マラブル楽団のメンバーを紹介しようフェイトジョー・ハワードに加えてベビー・ドッズドラム)、ジョージ・ポップス・フォスターベース)、デヴィッド・ジョーンズメロフォン)、ジョニー・セント・シールバンジョー)、ボイド・アトキンススウィングバイオリン)、もう一人いたが、忘れてしまった。音楽好きの子なら誰でも、彼らと一緒に楽器を吹きたいと思っていたことだろう。その証拠に、皆彼らからレッスンを受けたくて、頑張ってレッスン代を工面したものだった。当時のニューオーリンズは景気も悪く、食べていければまだマシで、楽器のレッスン代など論外だった。骨の髄まで音楽にハマっていない限り、楽器を続けることなど無理というものだった。 

[文法] 

Any kid interested in music would have appreciated playing with them 

音楽に興味のある子なら誰でも彼らと一緒に演奏できることを嬉しく思ったはずだった 

(would have appreciate) 

 

The Streckfus Steam Boats were owned by four brothers, Vern, Roy, Johnny and Joe. Captain Joe was the oldest, and he was the big boss. There was no doubt about that. All of the brothers were fine fellows and they all treated me swell. At first I had the feeling that everybody was afraid of the big chief, Captain Joe. I had heard so much about how mean Captain Joe was that I could hardly blow my horn the first time I played on the steamer Sydney, but he soon put me at ease. But he did insist that everyone attend strictly to his business. When we heard he was coming on board everybody including the musicians would pitch in and make the boat spic and span. He loved our music; as he stood behind us at the bandstand he would smile and chuckle while he watched us swing, and he would order special tunes from us. We almost overdid it, trying to please him.  

[訳] 

ストレックファス汽船船の所有者は、ヴァーン、ロイ、ジョニー、そしてジョーの4人の兄弟だった。キャプテン・ジョーが長男で、間違いなく大親分だった。4人共皆いい人達で、僕のことを可愛がってくれた。最初の頃は、皆大親分のキャプテン・ジョーのことを怖がっていたように感じた。キャプテン・ジョーが意地悪だとあまりに沢山聞かされていたものだから、初めてシドニー号で楽器を吹いた時には、ほとんどまともに吹ききれなかった。彼が僕をリラックスさせてくれたのは、その後まもなくのことである。彼は乗員には全員しっかり仕事をするよう求めた。彼が船に乗ってくると、ミュージシャン達の含めて全員に緊張が走り、船内をきちんとした状態にしようとした。彼は僕達の演奏を大層気に入ってくれていた。演奏中後方に立って、笑顔を浮かべて、僕達のノリノリの演奏を見入っていた。時々彼が特別に曲をリクエストをすることがあり、僕達も彼を喜ばそうと、少々やりすぎた感がある。 

[文法] 

I had heard so much about how mean Captain Joe was that I could hardly blow my horn 

私はキャプテン・ジョーどれだけ意地悪かあまりにも聞いていたので、楽器をほとんど吹けなかった(so much that) 

 

Captain Joe got the biggest boot out of Baby Dodds, our drummer, who used to shimmy while he beat the rim shots on his drum. Lots of times the whole boat would stop to watch him. Even after I stopped working on his boat Captain Joe used to bring his wife and family to hear me play my trumpet.  

[訳] 

キャプテン・ジョーはベビー・ドッズが大のお気に入りだった。ドッズはドラムで、リムショット(太鼓の縁を叩く)の時にはいつも激しく体全体でノリノリだった。大抵、乗員乗客皆が手を止めて彼に注目した。後の僕がこの楽団を辞めて船から降りた後も、キャプテン・ジョーは奥さんや家族と一緒に僕のトランペットの演奏を聞きに来てくれた。 

[慣用句] 

got the biggest boot out of ~を大いに気に入る 

 

Captain Vern reminded me, smile and all, of my favorite movie comedian, Stan Laurel. At our very first meeting he gave me such a warm smile that I felt I had known him all my life. That feeling lasted as long as I was on that boat. Lots of people made a good living working on the boats of the Streckfus Line.  

[訳] 

キャプテン・ヴァーンは、その笑顔も何もかも、僕がファンの映画コメディアンであるスタン・ローレルを彷彿とさせた。初めて会ったときの笑顔があまりも温かで、最初から知り合いだったのではないかと錯覚してしまったほどだ。その感覚はこの船にいる間ずっと感じていた。この会社の乗員の多くは良い給料を稼がせてもらっていたのだ。 

[文法] 

I felt I had known him all my life 

私はまるで生まれてからずっと彼のことを知っているかのように感じた(I felt I had known) 

 

My last week in New Orleans while we were getting ready to go up river to Saint Louis I met a fine young white boy named Jack Teagarden. He came to New Orleans from Houston, Texas, where he had played in a band led by Peck Kelly. The first time I heard Jack Teagarden on the trombone I had goose pimples all over; in all my experience I had never heard anything so fine. Jack met all the boys in my band. Of course he met Captain Joe as well, for Captain Joe was a great music lover and he wanted to meet every good musician and have him play on one of his boats. Some of the finest white bands anyone could ever want to hear graced his bandstands, as well as the very best colored musicians. I did not see Jack Teagarden for a number of years after that first meeting, but I never ceased hear ing about him and his horn and about the way he was improving all the time. We have been musically jammed buddies ever since we met.  

[訳] 

ニューオーリンズでの最後の週セントルイス旅立つ準備をしている間白人の若き好青年ジャック・ティーガーデン出会った彼はペック・ケリーが率いるバンドのメンバーとして、テキサス州ヒューストンからここニューオーリンズへとやってきたのだ。ジャック・ティーガーデンのトロンボーンを初めて聞いた時、鳥肌が立った。それまでこれほど素晴らしい演奏を経験したことはなかった。ジャックはウチのメンバー全員と顔を合わせた。勿論キャプテン・ジョーにも会った。キャプテン・ジョーは大の音楽好きで、優れたミュージシャンにはとにかく会って、彼の船に出演してもらっていた。彼の船に出演することを名誉に思う優れた有色人種系バンドはいくつもあり、同じように白人系の優秀な人気バンドにもいくつかそういう楽団があった。ジャック・ティーガーデンとはこの初めての出会い以降長らく会う機会がなかったが、彼の噂、彼の演奏の噂、彼が常に上手くなっている噂は、途切れなく僕の耳に入ってきていた。僕達は出会って以来、ずっと今日までも「ジャム・バディ」(いつでも分かり合えるガクタイ同士)である。 

 

Finally everything was set for me to leave my dear home town and travel up and down the lazy Mississippi River blowing my little old cornet from town to town. Fate Marable's Band deserves credit for breaking down a few barriers on the Mississippi barriers set up by Jim Crow. We were the first colored band to play most of the towns at which we stopped, particularly the smaller ones. The ofays were not used to seeing col ored boys blowing horns and making fine music for them to dance by. At first we ran into some ugly expe riences while we were- on the bandstand, and we had to listen to plenty of nasty remarks. But most of us were from the South anyway. We were used to that kind of jive, and we would just keep on swinging as though nothing had happened. Before the evening was over they loved us. We couldn't turn for them singing our praises and begging us to hurry back.  

[訳] 

いよいよ準備が整った愛する故郷の町を離れ気だるく流れるミシシッピ川ゆき僕の長年の愛器であるコルネットを吹いて町から町を渡り歩くのだ。ミシシッピ川にはいくつも壁がある。ジム・クロウ法によって作られた壁だ。フェイト・マラブルの楽団は、そのいくつかをぶっ壊すにふさわしい楽団だ。大概の行く先々の、特に小規模の都市では、僕達が初めて公演を開いた有色人種系バンドだった。こういった場所では、白人連中は、自分達がダンスをする曲を黒人連中が見事に吹いてみせることに、慣れていなかった。当初何回か嫌な思いをした。演奏中嫌というほど罵声を浴びたのだ。しかし僕達の大半は南部出身で、こんな連中には慣れており、とにかく我関せずとひたすらノリノリに演奏し続けた。本番が終わる頃には、彼らは僕達にゾッコンである。賞賛の嵐、そして早期の再演の要請であった。 

[解説] 

ジム・クロウ法:1876-1964有色人種に対する差別的措置(アメリカ南部諸州) 

 

I will never forget the day I left New Orleans by train for Saint Louis to join the steamer Saint Paul. It was the first time in my life I had ever made a long trip by railroad. I had no idea as to what I should take, and my wife and mother did not either. For my lunch Mayann went to Prat's Creole Restaurant and bought me a great big fish sandwich and a bottle of green olives. David Jones, the melophone player in the band, took the same train with me. He was one of those erect guys who thought he knew everything. He could see that I was inexperienced, but he did not do anything to make 

the trip pleasant for me. He was older than I, and he had been traveling for years in road shows and circuses while I was in short pants.  

[訳] 

ニューオーリンズ離れた日のことはずっと忘れないだろう。セントルイスへ行き蒸気船セント・ポール号に合流べく、列車に乗るのだ。鉄道での長距離移動はこの時が初めてだった。持ち物の見当がつかず、家内も母も同様だった。昼の弁当に、と、メイアンはプラッツというクレオールレストランに行き、大きなフィッシュサンドとグルーンオリーブの瓶詰めを買ってきてくれた。メロフォンのデヴィッド・ジョーンズが同じ列車に乗り込んだ。彼は自称「何でも知っている」とドヤ顔を振りまく輩の一人だ。彼は僕が旅慣れていないことを見て取ったにもかかわらず、何も助けてくれなかった。彼は僕よりも年上で、僕がまだ小さい頃からドサ回りやサーカス一座で、何年も旅回りをしていたのだ。 

[文法] 

he did not do anything to make the trip pleasant for me 

彼は僕のために旅行を快適にするために何もしてくれなかった(make ) 

 

When we arrived at Galesburg, Illinois, to change trains, my arms were full of all the junk I had brought with me. In addition to my cornet I had a beat-up suit case which looked as though it had been stored away since Washington crossed the Delaware. In this grip (that's what we called a suitcase in those days) Mayann had packed all my clothes which I had kept at her house because Daisy and I quarrelled so much. The suitcase was so full there was not room for the big bottle of olives. I had to carry the fish sandwich and olives in one arm and the cornet and suitcase in the other. What a trip that was!  

[訳] 

イリノイ州ゲールスバーグに到着し、ここで乗り換える。僕の両腕は荷物でいっぱいだった。コルネットと、オンボロのスーツケース。独立戦争の頃からあるんじゃないのか?と思いたくなるような代物だ。このグリップ(当時のスーツケースの呼び方)の中には、メイアンが、僕がデイジーと喧嘩するたびに実家に持ち帰った沢山の服が全て詰め込まれていた。なので、オリーブの大きな瓶詰めを入れる隙間などあるわけがなく、片手にフィッシュサンドとオリーブの瓶詰め、もう片手に楽器ケースとスーツケースを抱えていた。何ともみっともない旅行者である。 

[解説] 

Washington crossed the Delaware:1776年独立戦争の戦局を変えた戦いの一つ 

 

The conductor came through the train hollering: "All out for Galesburg." He followed this with a lot of names which did not faze me a bit, but when he said, "Change trains for Saint Louis," my ears pricked up like a jackass.  

[訳] 

車掌が大きな声をあげながらやってきた「ゲールスバーグでお降りの方はお忘れ物の無いように!」。他にも色々言っていたが、僕が気にしなければならないことは何もなかった。しかし次の瞬間耳がロバのように反応した「セントルイスにおいでの方はお乗り換えください」。 

 

When I grabbed all my things I was so excited that I loosened the top of my olive bottle, but somehow I managed to reach the platform with my arms full. The station was crowded with people rushing in all direc tions. David Jones had had orders to look out for me, but he didn't. He was bored to tears. He acted as though I was just another colored boy he did not even know. That is the impression he tried to give people in the station. All of a sudden a big train came around the bend at what seemed to me a mile a minute. In the rush to get seats somebody bumped into me and knocked the olives out of my arm. The jar broke into a hundred pieces and the olives rolled all over the plat form. David Jones immediately walked away and did not even turn around. I felt pretty bad about those good olives, but when I finally got on the train I was still holding my fish sandwich. Yes sir, I at least man aged to keep that.  

[訳] 

荷物を全部手にした時冷静さを欠いていたのか、オリーブの瓶詰めの蓋を緩めてしまった。でも何とか、両腕が一杯になりながらもプラットホームにたどり着いた。駅は大勢の人でごった返しており、皆色んな方向に向かって急いでいた。デヴィッド・ジョーンズは僕の面倒をみるよう言いつけられていたのに、それをしなかった。彼は死ぬほど退屈な思いをしていて、まるで僕を赤の他人の黒人だと言わんばかりに振る舞い、駅構内にいる人達にそんな印象を与えようとしていた。そこへ突然、大型列車がカーブを曲がって構内へ入ってきた。僕には分速1マイルくらいの、ものすごいスピードに見えた。座席を確保しようとごった返す中、誰かが僕にぶつかってきて、腕に抱えていたオリーブの瓶詰めを吹っ飛ばしてしまった。瓶は粉々に砕け、オリーブの実がホーム上にバラバラと転がった。デヴィッド・ジョーンズはそそくさとその場を立ち去り、振り返りすらしなかった。こんな良いオリーブの実がもったいないと思ったが、まだフィッシュサンドが残されていると思い、列車に乗り込んだ。そう、少なくともこれは死守したのだ。 

[文法] 

a big train came around the bend at what seemed to me a mile a minute 

大きな列車が僕には分速1マイルのスピードに見えるくらいの速さでカーブを曲がってきた 

(what seemed to me) 

 

By this time I was getting kind of warm about Br'er Jones, and I went right up to him and told him off. I told him he put on too many airs and plenty more. And I did not say a word to him all the way to Saint Louis. There the laugh was on him. It was real cold and he was wearing an overcoat and a straw hat. When I heard the people roar with laughter as they saw David Jones get off the train I just laid right down on the ground and almost laughed myself to death. But his embarrassment was far worse than mine had been, and I finally began to feel sorry for him. He was a man of great experience and he should have known better. He could not get angry with me for laughing at him con sidering how he had treated me. Later on we became good friends, and that is when he started helping me out reading music.  

[訳] 

事ここに至って僕はだんだんジョーンズの兄貴本性が分かり始めた僕は彼の方へ近づくと文句を言った格好つけ過ぎでウンザリする、と言ってやったそしてセントルイスに着くまでの間、一言も口をきかなかった。セントルイスに到着した時、今度は彼が笑われる番になってしまった。とても寒い気候であったのに、彼はオーバーコートと、なんと麦わら帽子をかぶっていたのだ。列車を降りたデヴィッド・ジョーンズの姿を見た人達が大爆笑する声が聞こえた時、僕も死にそうになるくらい笑い転げた。でも彼が感じた恥ずかしい思いは、僕の比ではなく、最後には彼が気の毒に思えた。彼は経験が豊富なのだから、帽子についても準備しておくべきだったのだ。道中の僕への仕打ちのことを考えれば、彼も僕に笑われたことに腹を立てるわけにもいかなかったのだ。後に僕達は良い友人同士となり、それから彼が僕に譜面の読み方を教えてくれるようになった。 

[文法] 

he should have known better 

彼は状況をもっとよく知っておくべきだった(should have known) 

 

The first night I arrived I was amazed by Saint Louis and its tall buildings. There was nothing like that in my home town, and I could not imagine what they were all for. I wanted to ask someone badly, but I was afraid I would be kidded for being so dumb. Finally, when we were going back to our hotel I got up enough courage to question Fate Marable.  

"What are all those tall buildings? Colleges?"  

"Aw boy," Fate answered, "don't be so damn dumb." Then I realized I should have followed my first hunch and kept my mouth shut. 

[訳] 

セントルイスに到着した最初の夜、僕は高層ビル群に圧倒されてしまった。僕の地元にはこのようなものは無く、何のための建物なのか想像もつかなかった。誰かに聞いてみなくて仕方なかったが、間抜けだと馬鹿にされるのがこわかった。でも結局、ホテルに戻った時、勇気を振り絞ってフェイト・マラブルに質問した。 

「あの高い建物が沢山並んでいるのは何なんですか?大学?」 

フェイトは答えた「おいおい、お上りさんみたいなこと言うなよ」。 

その時、最初の直感を信じていればよかったと後悔し、口をつぐむようにした。  

[文法] 

I was afraid I would be kidded for being so dumb 

私はあまりに物を知らないとして馬鹿にされるのを恐れた(for being so dumb)