英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:6章(1/3)Moving to Higher Ground by W. Marsalis

6. CHAPTER SIX 

Lessons from the Masters 

第6章  名人達から教わったこと 

 

Formal education of the first order: playing in public with the great John Lewis. Because of the pressure of playing onstage, one concert is worth two months in the practice room. 

<写真脚注> 

最高の教育の機会 - ジョン・ルイス大先生との共演。本番の舞台上で演奏するというプレッシャーのおかげで、1回のコンサートで2か月間練習室に籠り切って身に付くものと同じものが得られるのです。 

 

What I love most about Negro spirituals is how they put Moses and Jesus, Ezekiel and Abraham, together in time and then say, “I spoke to them,” as if that time were now. 

黒人霊歌で僕が「いいな」と一番思うのは、歌の中では、モーゼやイエス、エゼキル、そしてアブラハムといった、本来違う時代の人とされる人物達が、あたかも今この場で、声をそろえて「私は彼らと語り合った」と言っているかのように思わせてくれることです。 

 

For me, all history is now. For some reason, this notion is not accepted in the fields of jazz education, performance, or criticism. Instead, we get the oversimplified story of steadily growing musical “evolution” that jazz writers like to tell and retell: impoverished infancy in New Orleans around the turn of the twentieth century; raucous adolescence in Chicago and New York through the twenties; big-band swing in the thirties; the birth of bebop in the forties; and then a profusion of schools and counterschools, each moving the music further and further from its blues roots. 

僕にとっては、過去の出来事と言うのは、全て消えることなく残って積み重なってゆき、それが今という瞬間を作っているように思えます。でも訳あって、この考え方が受け入れてもらえない分野があって、それがジャズの教育や演奏活動、あるいは批評の仕方なのです。「過去の積み重ね」という考え方ではなく、耳にすることが出来るのは、あまりにも単純化された説明の仕方で、ジャズに関する物書きの方々が好んで繰り返し語る「順調に伸び行く音楽の進化」というやつです。極貧の黎明期、ニューオーリンズでの20世紀初頭の前後10年。喧噪の成長期、シカゴやニューヨークでの1920年代の10年。ビッグバンドスウィングの1930年代。ビーバップが誕生した1940年代。その後の乱立する学校や学校以外の教育機関の時代。それぞれが、ブルースという根源からジャズという音楽を、より彼方へと進化させていった、と物書きの方々は言うのです。 

 

The best musicians know this music isn't about “schools” at all. Like my father says, “There's only one school, the school of 'Can you play?'” It's about the individual men and women who can honestly answer yes to that question. 

でも本当に優れたミュージシャン達は知っています。このジャズという音楽は「学校」とかそういうこととは全然関係が無い、ということを。僕の父も言っていますが「学びの場(ステージ)は唯一つ。『君は演奏できるのか?』という学びの場(ステージ)だ」。その問いかけには、男女問わず、「できるさ」と心から答えられる、それが求められる場(ステージ)なのです。 

 

Many of the most valuable lessons I've learned about jazz were imparted by way of stories. Colorful storytelling makes for a community feeling around and through the music. Jazz concerns people and what they do. Just saying the name of a particular musician evokes the whole of their person embodied in their sound. Sometimes older musicians will sit around, giving a roll call of people you never heard of, saying where they were from, and then raving about the way they played this tune or that: “Yeah, man, Little Bobby Moore was a mean motor scooter. Ask Dizzy. He'll tell you. Bobby came into a place with his horn, people start hiding theirs.” 

僕は色々な人の話から、ジャズについて非常に大切なことを多く学びました。その人色とりどりの語り口のおかげで、話題に上る音楽の周辺とその中身に、自分も入り込めるのです。ジャズは、人とその行いを表現する音楽です。ミュージシャンの名前を口にするだけで、サウンドに込められているそのミュージシャンの人となりが、呼び起こされてきます。時々ベテランのミュージシャン達は、ぼーっと座って、聞いたこともないようなミュージシャン達の名前を次々と口にしては、何某はどこの出身だとか、この曲の演奏は良かっただの、あの曲の演奏は良かっただのと褒めちぎってゆくのです。「そうさ、ボビー・ムーアってやつは、性格がきつくて、やたらとまくし立てる男だった。ディジーディジー・ガレスピー)に訊いてみな。教えてくれるだろう。ボビーが自分の楽器を持って部屋に入ってくると、皆、自分の楽器を片付けてしまったものさ。」 

 

Sometimes you learn from masters by what they do. In the late 1980s, we played a concert opposite Pearl Bailey, and she brought me a gift to show how gracious musicians used to be when they headlined concerts together. She made a point of telling me that's what she was doing, too. Not that I actually buy gifts for people at jazz festivals ― but I think, even all these years later, that I should start. 

時には、色々な名手達の行いから、僕は学びました。1980年代後半、僕達はパール・ベイリーとのコンサートを開催しました。彼女はこの時、僕に差し入れをくれたのです。昔はミュージシャン達は、本番を一緒にする時はいつも礼を尽くしたもので、それを伝えたくて、とのこと。今、僕はジャズフェスティバルが開催されても差し入れはしませんが、いずれはそうするべきかな、と思っています。 

 

Tony Williams played with Miles Davis's band when he was seventeen or eighteen. He could sing entire albums ― everyone's solo. He was a very intense man, self-contained and private. But he had some great observations about music and musicians. He told me he noticed that the musicians with the best time didn't tap their feet when playing. Because when you're tapping your feet every rhythm you play becomes a polyrhythm, a feat of coordination like rubbing your stomach patting your head.  

トニー・ウィリアムズが、マイルス・デイビスのバンドでドラムを叩いていたのは、彼が17、18歳の頃でした。彼はアルバム全曲 - 一人一人のソロも、空で歌うことができたのです。気性が激しく、人とは打ち解けないし人付き合いもしない性格でしたが、音楽とそれを奏でるミュージシャン達に対する観察力の素晴らしさを、随所で発揮していました。ミュージシャン達というものは、最高に調子が良い状態の時は、演奏中に足踏みをしないことに気付いた、と彼は僕に教えてくれたことがあります。というのも、そもそも演奏中に足踏みなんかしてしまうと、出てくるリズムが、ポリリズムと言って、腹をさすりながら頭をポンポンとはたくような、妙チキリンなものになってしまう、というわけです。 

 

The master drummer Elvin Jones was one of the most soulful men in the world. I would get to his house around eleven or twelve at night, and his wife, Keiko, would have the lobster and sushi ready and the sake flowing. We went on several tours together. I loved him like a father. Once we were playing so hard my lips started bleeding. I didn't want to tell him that I thought he was playing too loud. Finally, I got up the courage to tell him. He started at me for a while and then said, “All you had to do was say something. Ain't nobody on earth above being told something.” 

ドラムの名人、エルヴィン・ジョーンズは、世界でも指折りのソウルフルな男でした。僕はよく彼の家に夜の11時頃に訪ねてゆくと、奥様のケイコさんが、ロブスターだの寿司だのを用意してくれていて、日本酒なんかも次々と出してくれました。何回かツアーで一緒に彼とは回ったことがあり、僕は彼を父親のように慕っていました。ある時僕達が共演した際、かなり激しい演奏になってしまったため、僕の唇が出血しだしてしまったことがあります。彼の音量があまりにも大きすぎたためなのですが、そんなこと思っていても言いたくなかったので、彼には黙っていました。でもそうもいかず、結局恐る恐る彼に言ってみたのです。彼はしばらく僕をじっと見ると、こう言いました「そういう時は言わなきゃ。誰も解らんだろうが」。 

 

Rehearsing a jazz piece requires diplomacy. You need the musicians to want to play your music. You have to walk that thin line between criticising and aggravating. They are, after all, making up a lot of, especially the drummer. A dispute with the drummer is a serious thing. The composer, bandleader, and consummate musician Benny Carter was one of the most elegant men in jazz. He was refined, clear, and very serious about the music. I once saw him get testy with a drummer who wasn't playing what he wanted. They went back and forth and things became a little wordy. Benny diplomatically ended the mouthiness by saying, “Use your own good taste. Use your own taste.” The arranger and tenor saxophonist Frank Wess, who had been a mainstay of the Count Basie Orchestra, took another approach: He would inquire, “Why are you motherfuckers playing so loud?” and wait for the volume to come down. It did. 

ジャズの作品を合わせ練習する際に必要なのが、これを仕切る人の「外交的手腕」というやつです(大げさに言えば)。仕切る人の音楽性に「ついて行こう」と思わせなければなりません。言いたいことを、しっかり伝えたり、グッと我慢したりと、絶妙な綱渡りをする必要があります。何だかんだ言っても、仕切る人が一人で出来ることなど限られているわけで、他の人達が演奏の大半を作ってゆくわけです。その中でも特にドラム奏者の存在は大変大きなものがあります。彼とは口論になってしまったら大変です。作曲やバンドリーダーもこなした円熟のミュージシャンだったベニー・カーターは、ジャズ界では最もエレガントな人でした。彼の音楽は、洗練され、明快であり、自身の音楽への取り組みは真剣そのものでした。僕は一度彼が、言う事を聞かないドラム奏者にイラついているのを見たことがあります。二人とも互いに譲らず、押し問答が続きました。ベニーは「外交的手腕」を発揮し、「好きにしな、好きにしな」と言って、この大論争を収めたのです。これとは別の方法を取っていたのがフランク・ヴェス。編曲もこなすテナーサックス奏者で、カウント・ベイシー楽団の大黒柱だった人です。彼のやり方はこうです。「お前らバカ共は、なんでそんなバカデカイ音をかき鳴らしてんだ、あ?!」と「質問」をし、音量が下がるのを待ちます。すると音量が下がってゆく、というわけです。 

 

Some musicians insult you with humor. In the summer of 1987, Thelonious Monk's great tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse went on the road with my quartet. He played some of the most swinging, to-the-point stuff you ever heard. He loved when we would play a wild style we called “burnout” ― faster and faster, with all kinds of drum rhythms interlocking with the piano while the bass tried to survive and hold the beat down. On night at a club in St. Louis, after I played a long nonstop solo full of fast, nonswinging 232nd notes, all high, crazy, and nonmelodic but fun to play, Charlie Rouse looked at me as I drenched with sweat, and said, “Well ... that ought to fix 'em.” 

ミュージシャンの中には、人をこき下ろすにしても、ユーモアを交えてくる人達がいます。1987年の夏のこと。僕達のツアーに参加してくれたチャーリー・ラウズは、セロニアス・モンクの楽団の偉大なテナーサックス奏者です。彼の演奏は最高にスウィングの効いた、的確なものでした。彼のお気に入りは、僕達の荒っぽい演奏スタイルである「バーンアウト:焼き尽くし」。テンポを加速し、あらゆる種類のドラムのリズムパターンをピアノと連動させ、その間ベースが喰らい付き、頑張ってビートを重ねてゆくのです。ある夜、セントルイスのクラブでのこと。僕がテンポの速い、スウィングをかけない細かな音符が並ぶ、高音域の狂ったような、メロディックでないれど吹くには楽しいという、延々続くソロを吹いたのですが、僕が汗だくになっているのを見たチャーリー・ラウズが言った言葉は「すごいや、お客さんが喜ぶわけだ」。 

 

When I really think about it, even though I was surrounded by records and musicians at an early age, my tastes were like those of any kid of my generation. Then, at some point, I began to understand that these musicians were great because of the quality of their insights and the powerful expression of those ideas. By now, I've met almost all of the great ones still alive and I've had the good fortune to play with many of them. Others I know only through their recordings. Here are some of the larger lessons a baker's dozen of the masters taught me, along with the titles of a handful of CDs worth listening to. Of course, with jazz everyone is free to find his or her own lessons. All you have to do is listen.  

じっくりそう考えてみると、小さい頃から、僕の身の回りにはレコードやら生身のミュージシャンやらが沢山存在していたにもかかわらず、僕の音楽面での好みは、自分と同世代のそれと大体同じでした。そしてある程度僕が理解し始めていたのは、こういったミュージシャン達の偉大さは、彼らの五感の鋭さと、そこでつかんだ思いを力強く表現することに在った、ということです。今までに、彼らのほぼ全員に面と向かって会い、そして幸運にも、彼らの多くと演奏を共にしてきています。他は彼らの演奏の録音を通して知っているだけですが…。ではここで、13名の名人達から教わった、より大きな教訓の数々を、おススメのCD数タイトルと共にご紹介します。当然のことながら、ジャズというものは、誰の許可を得ずとも、自分にとってためになることを見つけてゆけば良いのです。演奏に耳を傾けさえすれば良いのです。 

 

 

LOUIS ARMSTRONG 

ルイ・アームストロング 

 

I'm always asked, “Did you ever meet Armstrong?” 

ルイ・アームストロングに会ったことはありますか?」といつも聞かれます。 

 

“No,” I answer, “and I'm glad I didn't, because he died in 1971 before my appreciation of him developed.” I thought he was just some Uncle Tom with a trumpet. I'm glad I didn't have the opportunity to ever think disrespectful thoughts in the presence of such a great man. 

僕の答えは「ありません。そして会わなくて良かったと思っています。なぜなら、彼に対する僕の好みがハッキリする前に、彼は1971年に亡くなったからです」。彼はラッパを持つアンクル・トムみたいなものでしかない、と僕は考えていました。こんな大御所を目の前にして、無礼千万な考えや思いを、心に抱いてしまう機会が巡ってこなくて、本当に良かった、と思っています。 

 

With Louis Armstrong, you have the deepest human feeling and the highest level of musical sophistication. He is down-home soul and compassion, but with plenty of fire. He is built like a bull and could knock you down and out if necessary. 

ルイ・アームストロングといえば、誰よりも深みのある感情表現と、高いレベルで洗練された音楽性です。彼は飾らない心と思いやりを持ちながらも、心に大きな炎をいつも灯していました。牛のように体格が良く、その気になれば人間を一人ノックダウンさせてしまうこともできた、とのこと。 

 

Louis Armstrong is a celebration of the freedom to be yourself. He always knew and loved himself. He embraced the things he was most proud of, like his artistry, as well as the things he knew needed work, like his command of the written language. He didn't hide. 

ルイ・アームストロングは、人は誰にはばかることなく、自分らしくあるべきだ、ということを示した人です。常に彼は自分自身を把握し、そして愛おしみました。彼は自らのアーティストとしての腕前に誇りを持ち、これを大切にしましたが、同時に、例えば「読み書き」といった、自分がしっかり取り組むべき課題と自覚していた事柄についても、キチンと向き合っていたのです。 

 

Pops grew up in teeth-clenching poverty as a member of the absolute lowest social stratum. He knew the bottom. He understood that poverty is not always the defining element of poor people's identities. He was raised by people who embraced life under extreme circumstances, and their hard-earned optimism was passed on to him, and then to the world, through his horn. 

ポップス(訳注:ルイ・アームストロングの愛称)は、社会階層のドン底にあえぐ者の一人として、貧困の苦しみの中で育ちました。世間の最下層を知る彼にとっては、貧困とは、お金に困っている人々のアイデンティティを定義する要素には、必ずしもなり得ないモノでした。彼を育てた人々は、極限状態にあっても生きることを大切にし、その前向きな姿勢は彼にきちんと受け継がれ、後にそれは彼の奏でるトランペットの音に乗り全世界へと伝わったのです。 

 

When I was growing up, some of the poorest people I knew ― like my great-aunts and -uncles and my grandma ― were the most colorful. You had a good time with them. For one thing, with them you ate good: beans and rice, bacon sandwitches, stuffed mirlitons. Pops always spoke about his “eventful” childhood with great relish. 

僕が育ってゆく過程で出会った、最もお金に困っている人達、例えば僕の大叔母や大叔父といった人達というのは、最も輝いていた人達でもありました。一緒に居るのが実に心地よい人達です。美味しいモノを一緒に食べて - と言っても、豆御飯だの、ベーコンサンドだの、ハヤト瓜の詰め物ですが。ポップスは、「色々なことがあった」幼い頃の思い出話を、いつも実に楽しそうに聞かせてくれたのです。 

 

Now, if you are young Louis Armstrong singing in a boy's quartet, every person who hears your music says, “Damn, this guy is something!” Then you get arrested for fooling around with a gun on New Year's Eve and sent to the Colored Waif's Home for Boys. You start playing cornet and quickly become better that all the rest of the kids. They are looking at you and saying, “Little Louis is unbelievable.” There were many great cornetists in the New Orleans of his youth, and he listened with the ear of a genius to what all of them played. Not only did he hear what they were playing, he heard what they were trying to play. And, eventually, he played both. 

では皆さんも、ルイ・アームストロングになったつもりで、彼の生い立ちを一緒に見てゆきましょう。幼い頃、彼は子供達だけで編成したカルテット(訳注:バーバー・ショップ・カルテット)で歌っています。誰もが彼の歌声を聞くと「大したもんだ」と言います。そんな折、大晦日の晩のこと。ふざけて銃を発砲してしまったことにより、警察に逮捕されてしまうのです。収監された先は、有色人種の浮浪少年達が専ら集められる「少年の家」。ここでコルネットを習い始めると、みるみる他の子供達を追い越して上達してゆきます。「ルイ君はスゴイな」と皆が口々に言います。ニューオーリンズには当時からコルネットの名手が沢山いて、彼は以前からこういった名手達の演奏を、鋭い感性を持つ耳で聴き漁っていたのでした。その時、彼の耳に入ってきたのは、名手達が奏でる音だけでなく、「奏でようとする」心であったのです。やがて彼は、その両方を自分のモノにしてゆきました。 

 

His sense of self-worth grows every time he demonstrates his genius in a different environment. He's always the best ― and by a lot. He learns music faster than other people do. He can hear harmonies better. He invents more memorable melodies than any other teenager. He's more in tune. Everybody is begging him, “Show me how to do that.” He's outplaying grown men all over New Orleans by the time he's seventeen. 

彼は、様々な機会に自分の才能を世に示し、その度に自分への誇りの気持ちを膨らませてゆきました。彼は同世代の若者達から群を抜いて上手かった - それも桁外れに。誰よりも学ぶ吸収力があり、誰よりもハーモニーを聞く力があり、誰よりも心に残るメロディを生み出す力がありました。「教えてくれよ」と皆が乞うてきたのです。17歳になるまでには、彼はニューオーリンス中の大人達よりも腕を上げていました。 

 

Then, he joins King Oliver in Chicago, where it soon dawns on him: “Wait a second now, I'm playing better than everybody in Chicago, too.” He goes to New York to join Fletcher Henderson's band, and he sees he's outplaying all of those cats, too. He eventually gets to Europe, and everybody is in awe of his artistry. Everywhere he goes, the same thing. He thinks, “Hey, all these cats can't be wrong.” 

その後彼は、キング・オリバーの楽団に入団します。楽団が本拠地を置くシカゴで、彼に「そうだ、シカゴでも俺は誰よりも上手くなってやる」という思いが降りてきたのです。彼はニューヨークへ向かい、フレッチャー・ヘンダーソン楽団に入団、ここでも気付けば抜群の腕を見せつけました。やがてヨーロッパにまで進出を果たしました。どこへ行ってもこんな感じで、彼は「皆、自分の才能をちゃんと評価してくれている」と思ったのです。 

 

And everyone who heard him loved him, except for the dicty people who looked down on him because of the way he sang or because he represented impoverished, uneducated people with natural gusto. He didn't care. Why would he? He didn't have to interact with them. He damn sure didn't interact with them when he was growing up. They weren't having more fun than he was having . And they weren't producing anybody like him. So he's probably thinking, “Okay, y'all might have a lot of stuff, but you don't have anybody that can play like me.” 

やがて彼の演奏を聞いた人々は、皆彼に心惹かれるようになりました。しかし中には、彼が、極貧・無学の人々が無邪気に心からの喜びを謳歌するその象徴である、として、彼を見下し嫌う人達もいたのです。彼は気にしませんでした。何故か?そういう人達とは関わらなかったからです。幼い頃などは特にね。「そういう人達」が味わうことのなかった喜びや悲しみを、彼は沢山味わいました。そして、「そういう人達」は、彼の様な人材を世に送り出すこともありませんでした。だからこそ、彼はこう思ったことでしょう「そうとも、あんたらは多くを手にしているかもしれないが、俺に様に吹けるヤツはいないじゃないか」。とね 

 

Again, by a lot. That “by a lot” is very important. It's one thing if most of your colleagues play more or less as well as you do, but another thing when you get to be twenty-three or twenty-four years old and no one is even remotely as good as you are. The whole world of popular music imitated him. How many men can say that? He could go anywhere in the world and people would be trying to imitate him. And he knew it. By 1929 or 1930, everybody was trying to be like him: the Poles, the French, the English, the Russians ― everybody. He heard himself everywhere, and he was bringing joy and happiness to all those people. How does a guy like that feel? Great. 

何度も言いますが、「桁外れに」吹ける、のです。この「桁外れに」がポイントです。「大半の仲間が、程度の差こそあれ自分と同レベルの演奏ができるかどうか微妙だ」ではありません。「自分が23,24歳になると、もう誰も自分の足元にも及ばなくなってしまっている」なのです。これは「桁外れ」な違いですよね。ポピュラー音楽に携わる者全てが、彼のマネをしました。その数は計り知れません。彼が訪れることのできない場所など、この世界にはどこにもなかったでしょうし、人々は彼の真似をしようとしました。彼の方も、それを知っていました。1929年、あるいは1930年頃までには、ポーランド人、フランス人、イギリス人、ロシア人、と、誰もが彼のようになることを目指しました。彼は行く先々で、自分の真似をしようとする人々の演奏を耳にして、そういう人々全てに、彼は喜びと幸福をもたらし続けました。そんなことが出来る人は、きっと自分も最高の気分であることでしょう。 

 

Louis Armstrong never tried to be someone else. His playing is free of artifice. It's pure substance. Einstein is supposed to have said the equation of relativity was so simple it had to be true. Armstrong's axiom is just as fundamental: It's okay to be you. 

ルイ・アームストロングは、誰かの真似をしようなどとは、考えもしませんでした。彼の演奏には、一つのごまかしもありません。「一点の曇りのない芸」とは、このことです。アインシュタインは、自分の考えだした相対性理論の方程式は、十分単純な作りになっているから、間違いなく「正しい」と証明される、と言ったとされています。アームストロングの芸も、それと全く同じく単純:「自分らしくてOKだ」。 

 

Louis Armstrong's sound has the power to heal. His playing is wisdom and forgiveness. He has the sound you hear in the voice of the person you go to when something really bad has happened to you. It can be your grandmama, your mama, or someone else. And that person, through her voice or touch, lets you know it's going to be all right. That feeling's in all of Louis Armstrong's music, that warmth and familiarity and the feeling that whatever you say, he will understand it ― and he will understand it from your point of view. 

ルイ・アームストロングサウンドには、癒しの力があります。彼の演奏には、自らの経験に基づく知恵と、人々を受け入れる寛容さがあります。自分に本当に不幸な出来事が起きた時に訪ねてゆく人の声の中に聞こえるサウンド、というものを、彼は持っています。「訪ねてゆく人」とは、自分のおばあちゃんだったり、おかあさんだったり、そのような人達だったりします。そういう人達は、声や手のぬくもりを通して、「大丈夫だぞ」と教えてくれます。ルイ・アームストロングの音楽全体に見受けられる、その感覚、温もり、親しみ、そして「この人には何を言ってもわかってもらえる」という感覚 - 彼には、聞く人の視点に立って理解しようとする姿勢があった、ということなのです。 

 

Jazz writing has created a false sense of division in our music, a superficial breakdown of innovations into ears and styles that gives the impression that the natural way of respect between older and younger folks is suspended when the younger ones invent a different way of playing. For example, you would think that the John Coltrane Quartet, exemplars of the avant-garde, would have seen themselves as far more advanced than Louis Armstrong. Well, Elvin Jones once told me that when Louis showed up at one of their gigs in a Chicago club, they all felt like children in his presence. McCoy Tyner, reflecting on that same evening, said, “That man was a king and full of great feeling.” 

ジャズのライター達によって、ジャズに関する誤った認識に基づいた線引きが、成されてしまっています。若い人達が、今までにない演奏方法を創り出すと、それはすなわち、年配の人達に対して当然示すべき敬意を捨てた、という印象を与えてる。そういった時代の流れや音楽の形式を「革新」と表現して、表面的な細分化をしようというものです。例えば、前衛芸術の典型とされる、ジョン・コルトレーンのカルテットは、「自分達はルイ・アームストロングよりも先進的だ」、と思っていたのではないか、と考える人がいるかもしれません。とんでもない話です。メンバーであったドラム奏者のエルヴィン・ジョーンズが、かつて僕に話してくれました。ある時、カルテットがシカゴで公演を行った際、ルイがこれに参加したのですが、メンバー全員、彼の前ではすっかり子供のようにワクワクしてしまった、とのこと。ピアノ奏者のマッコイ・ターナーも、その夜のことについて、「あの人は、やっぱり王様だ。オーラがすごかったよ」。 

 

Recommended Listening 

 

The Complete Hot Five and Hot Seven Recordings 

 

Live at Town Hall 

 

My Musical Autobiography 

 

おススメの銘盤 

 

ホットファイブ全集 / ホットセブン全集 

 

タウンホール・コンサート 

 

サッチモ音楽自叙伝 

 

 

ART BLAKEY 

アート・ブレイキー 

 

Seems like everything about the drummer and bandleader Art Blakey was a contradiction. He was a short man, but he seemed much bigger because he was so powerful. He could tell you the deepest truth and the most creative lies, both in the same sentence. He exhibited absolute integrity and spoke with moral authority on anything to do with jazz. But he also did all kinds of things that defied standards of acceptable behavior. 

アート・ブレイキーという人は、ドラム奏者としても、バンドリーダーとしても、何かにつけて「相反する」考え方や行動をとっていた人のようです。背が低いながらも、実際の背丈より大きく見えたのは、パワフルな人だったからでしょう。一言話すその中で、とても深い真実と、とてもクリエイティブなウソの、両方を織り交ぜてくるのです。ジャズに関しては、あらゆることについて、キチッとして誠実さを示し、節度ある威厳を感じさせる話し方をしました。ところが一方で、これまで受け入れられてきた規範を拒むようなことを、何でもやってきたのです。 

 

Blakey was a pioneer. Intelligent, ambitious, and thorough, he went to Ghana to study African drumming. He realized that American jazz drummers were distinguished by their ability to play three or four different rhythms at one time. He would say, “Never let your left hand know what your right hand is doing.” He was a Muslim long before other Americans became Muslims and was devoutly religious in his own way, even though that may sound like a strange thing to say about somebody who had all kinds of women, told the truth only if and when it suited him, and had to have his heroin when he needed it. Stuff like cognac, weed, and cocaine were just appetizers for his real drug of choice. 

ブレイキーは、新しいことや誰も気付かなかったことに思いを寄せる人でした。知的で、貪欲で、何事もとことんやり抜く彼は、アフリカのドラム奏法を学びに、ガーナへ向かいます。アメリカでは、ジャズドラム奏者の実力を測る際に、3つ4つの異なるリズムをいっぺんに弾ける力が、どの位あるか、が物差しになっている、と彼は気付きました。彼がよく言っていた言葉に「自分の右手がしていることを、自分の左手には知らせるな」というのがあります。彼がイスラム教に改宗したのは、アメリカでイスラム教への改宗が盛んになる前のことでした。自分も考え方に基づいて信仰を深めていった彼ですが、この様なことを書くと、奇妙に思う人もいるかもしれません。何しろ彼は、あらゆる女性と関係を持ち、自分に都合が良い時だけ真実を語り、ヘロインを常習したり、ですからね。コニャック、マリファナ、コカインなど、彼には物足りない代物でしかなかったのです(訳注:いずれもイスラム教では禁止事項)。 

 

Though he was often high, being around him taught you not to judge people, because you couldn't judge him. He was such an original, you loved him for who he was. He also would make it clear that you never know enough about people to judge them. You only know what appears true to you. Art Blakey was like the old cliche about the tip of the iceberg. What he showed you was a very small portion of what was actually there. 

彼はよく「お高く留まっている」と思われていましたが、彼と一緒に居て教えられたことは、他人を決めつけるようなことをしてはいけない、なぜなら、そんなことは誰にもできないからだ、ということです。彼の性格は実に独特なもので、皆、彼の人となりに惚れ込んだのです。他人を知り尽くすことなどできない、よって、他人を決めつけることなどできない、と、いつもハッキリそう言っていました。アート・ブレイキーのこの考え方は、「氷山の一角」というお馴染の言葉がピタリと当てはまります。目に飛び込んでくるものは、本当の姿のごく小さい一部分でしかない、ということです。 

 

He started out with big bands and knew how to orchestrate the drum parts to give an arrangement dramatic flair. He didn't read music but could make you think he could, because after hearing an arrangement once or twice he knew the whole thing. And he would improve it ― an important skill for drummers, who get little written music or instruction. Drummers must be free to make choices or the music will be stiff. An arrangement might call for some hits or accents, but drummers determine which cymbals to use, where to put the big beats of the bass drum, and how to build intensity or bring it down to a whisper. Drummers provide the grooving pulse of Africa that inspires dance and the percussion colorings that add flavor to European concert music. 

彼の出発点はビッグバンドで、ドラムパートを編成に加える上でのオーケストレーション(大編成アンサンブルの作品を作る方法)をよく心得ていました。彼は楽譜が読めませんでしたが、そう感じさせない位、彼の耳は素晴らしく、1回ないし2回聞いただけで、一曲全体を把握してしまう力を持っていたのです。その上で、それに手を加えて改良しようとしたのです。これはドラム奏者という、立場上楽譜や指示がほとんど与えらえれないミュージシャンにとって、重要なスキルなのです。ドラム奏者の裁量が制限されてしまっては、音楽に柔軟性がなくなってしまいます。曲作りにおいては、全員が一斉にタイミングをそろえて音を鳴らす「ヒット」や、音を強調する「アクセント」を設定する場合がありますが、そんな時でもドラム奏者は、どのシンバルを使うのか、どこでバスドラムを「ドスン」と一発下支えに入れるのか、テンションの上げ方と下げ方をどのようにもってゆくか、について、一人で決めてゆくのです。ドラム奏者が発信するグルーブ感の効いた、ダンスと打楽器の色付けを思い起こさせるアフリカのテイストが、ヨーロッパの演奏会用音楽へ加わるのです。 

 

“Bu” ― that's what we called him, short for Abdullah Ibn Buhaina, the Muslim name he adopted ― had superhuman endurance. He loved to brag, “Everybody that got high with me died fifteen years ago.” He got stronger as the tours went on. Catch him at four in the morning on the last days of an eight-week tour of Europe and you'd really hear something. During my first tour with his band we drove from New York to Houston, played a gig, and drove straight to L. A. and onto a bandstand. He was seventy-something and didn't even blink. We were forty to fifty years younger and tried as hell. 

「ブー」とは、私達の彼に対する呼び名です。彼のイスラム名「アブドラ・イブン・ブハイナ」を「ブー」と短縮したものです。ブーの強靭さは超人的でした。彼が好んで自慢していたことは、「俺と一緒にラリってた奴らは、みんな15年前に逝っちまったよ」。彼はツアーの時は、日を重ねてゆく毎にだんだんタフになってゆくのです。例えば、ヨーロッパツアーを2か月間行うとします。最終日が近付いたころの早朝夜明け前に、彼に声をかけても、彼はきっと素晴らしいパフォーマンスを見せることでしょう。僕が初めて彼のバンドのツアーに参加した時のことです。ニューヨークからヒューストンへ車で移動し、本番をこなして、そのままロサンゼルスへ車で移動し、また本番。彼は70才かそこらでしたが、眠気のまばたき一つしない。一方僕達は彼よりも40・50歳も若いのに、ヘトヘトになっていたのです。 

 

He taught you with his feeling. He had so much power and strength and belief that you would learn the meaning of playing just from being around him. But for all the informality and naturalness of his approach, he was meticulous about rehearsing and concerned above all about the enjoyment of the audience. “Play with dynamics because the people respond to drama in the music. And dynamics create drama. Rehearse this music thoroughly. Why should people pay to hear a sad, sloppy, unprepared performance!” 

彼の教えには、いつも彼の実感がこもっていました。彼の実行力、能力、信念は強く、傍にいるだけで、演奏とは何なのか、を学ぶことが出来たのです。彼のアプローチは気さくで自然でありつつも、本番に向けての練習中は、度が過ぎるほど他のメンバーに気を配り、そして何より、本番お客さんにどうしたら楽しんでもらえるかに心を砕いていました。「演奏は音量変化をしっかりつけて、人々は音楽に込められた物語に反応する。練習は完璧に、下手で薄っぺらで準備不足のパフォーマンスを聞くのに金を払う人などいない」。 

 

He was a big fan of you figuring things out. This is an important characteristic of great jazz bandleaders. They tell you, “Listen.” And if you say, “I don't hear it,” they say, “Well, don't play.” If you keep not hearing it, they send you home. In rehearsal, Blakey would play with the same intensity he brought to a gig, and when you commented on it he would say, “I only know one way to play.”  

彼は、物事を理解しようと頑張る人には、とことん味方になってくれました。これは優れたジャズのバンドリーダーというものを考える上で重要な性格(キャラクター)です。バンドリーダーとのやりとり、といえば、「ちゃんと聴けよ」「いや、聴いてもわからないですよ」「だったらやめろ」。聴いても解らない、が延々続けば、「もうお帰り下さい」ということになってしまいます。リハーサル中、ブレイキーは常に、本番と同じテンションで演奏していました。その理由を尋ねると、「俺はこんな風にしかドラムを叩けないからさ」と答えるのです。 

 

As an accompanist, he was a master of architecture who knew how to use dynamics in support of a soloist. From a whisper to a roar, his signature effect, the “press roll” went from a tiptoe to a full-out stomp in two seconds. He was not afraid of giving others the spotlight. He was a generous,inspirational leader who got the most out of his musicians by giving them a platform to do their thing. 

ドラムといえば伴奏楽器ですが、彼はソリストに対して、どのように音量変化をつけてゆくかを組み立て行く達人でした。囁くような音量から吠えるような音量まで出せるという、彼の代名詞ともいうべき「プレスロール」(訳注:ドラムのロール奏法の一つ)は、たった2秒で、つま先で撫でるようなp(ピアノ)から足踏みするようなf(フォルテ)まで音量を一気に変化させることが出来たのです。彼は他人に花を持たすことを厭わない人でした。リーダーとしては、心広く、人にインスピレーションを与えるような存在であり、自分が関わったミュージシャン達に対しては、彼らの力をいかんなく発揮できる舞台を与えることで、その力を最大限に引き出すことのできる人でした。 

 

Once every four or five months, when we would get out of hand or forget he was the leader, he would call us together and cuss us out: “You motherfuckers aren't playing shit. It's an honor to have a job playing this music and you obviously think this is a fucking game. This is the Jazz Messengers! Clifford Brown. Lee Morgan. Freddie Hubbard. And now your sad, nonplaying ass! We would look down and get quiet like children. But is was okay, because we knew he loved us and this music. 

4,5ヶ月に一度くらいのペースで僕たちが混乱したり彼がリーダーであるということを忘れた言動をとるようになると、彼は僕たちを呼んでこう言いました「バカだな、お前ら、別に下手クソでもなんでもないじゃないか。この曲演奏する仕事をもらえるなんて、有り難いことなんだぞ。お前らは、この仕事はしょうもない、と思っているのは、はっきりわかるよ。これがジャズメッセンジャーズってもんだ。クリフォード・ブラウンリー・モーガン、それにフレディ・ハバード。それでもって、お前らときたら、これじゃぁ本番に乗れないぞ。」こう言われると、僕たちも叱られた子供達のように、シュンとしてしまうのです。でもいいのです。なぜなら僕たちは、彼が僕たちを思ってくれていること、そしてこの音楽を愛してやまないことを知っていたからです。 

 

And then one day, he would say, “It's time to go get your own band and spread the music. If you get stranded out there and you need to make some money or something you can always come back. We are here.” He ran his band like a family. Cats would come back. 

そんな風に接するうちに、ある時彼らにこう言ってやるのです「そろそろ君も自分のバンドを立ち上げて自分の音楽を発信してゆく時だ。もし行き詰って、金でもモノでも困ったら、いつでも戻ってこい。俺達はいつでもここで待っていてやるからな。」彼は自分のバンドを家族のように切り盛りしたので、彼に関わったミュージシャン達は、再び彼の元を訪れるのでした。 

 

When we used to play at Mikell's in New York, all the drummers would come: Papa Jo Jones, Philly Joe Jones, Elvin Jones, Louis Bellson, Max Roach, Buddy Rich ― it's like they had a club, a drum thing. We would say everybody else died, but the drummers stayed alive. It's not true now, but in the early eighties generations of drummers were still alive and swinging. And they all turned out to see Bu. He expressed his love for the whole jazz tradition in his sound, in his feeling, and in the music we played. He'd have horn players playing shout choruses and people playing riffs ― even though it was a small band. I feel like he always wanted to get back to the big band. He loved that music. I regret that I didn't know how to arrange for big bands when I was with him. I wish he was with us now. 

僕達がニューヨークの名門ジャズクラブ「マイケルズ」に出演していた頃は、タイコ叩き達は皆、よくここに集まってきたものでした。パパ・ジョー・ジョーンズ、フィリー・ジョー・ジョーンズエルヴィン・ジョーンズ、ルイ・ベンソン、マックス・ローチバディ・リッチといった錚々たる顔ぶれが居並ぶと、そこはまるでドラム奏者達によるジャズクラブの様でした。「他のミュージシャン達は鳴かず飛ばずになっちまったが、俺たちタイコ叩きはバリバリだぜ。」などと、よく言ったものでした。今となっては昔の話ですが、1980年代初頭は、幅広い世代のドラム奏者達が、元気にスウィングを効かせていたのです。皆がブーの元を訪れるようになりました。彼のサウンド、演奏表現、ジャズ・メッセンジャーズの音楽には、彼のジャズ全体に対する愛情が込められていたのです。彼はよく管楽器奏者達にシャウトコーラスを吹かせてやったり、バンド全体ではリフもよくやらせたりしました。これは通常規模の大きなバンドがすることですが、彼は小編成のバンドであっても、これをよくやらせていました。きっと彼は、自分がこよなく愛したビッグバンドの全盛期が懐かしくて仕方なかったのではないか、と僕はそんな気がします。当時僕はビッグバンド用の譜面が書けず、今そのことがとても悔やまれます。出来ることなら、今再び、彼と仕事がしてみたい、と願うばかりです。 

 

It's hard to explain the love you feel for the bandleader who brings you out when you're young and inexperienced. He takes a chance on you and you never forget it. Jazz musicians say, “He brought me out here,” and that means a whole, whole lot. 

まだ若く経験が浅い自分を取りててくれるバンドリーダーに対して、心に抱く敬愛の気持ちを言葉で説明するのは、なかなか大変です。チャンスを与えてくれる人のことは、いつまでも忘れないものです。ジャズミュージシャン達が「彼のおかげで今の自分がある」という言葉の重みは、大変なものです。 

 

The word I would use to summarize him comes from the title of one of his albums: Indestructible. That's how he was. So we were all shocked when he died. I remember his memorial service at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. He had all his wives and children there, a lot of wives and kids. The feeling was so good and everybody played an laughed at stories about him. We all loved him because he gave so much of himself to the music and to us. He represented the ultimate feeling of jazz: easy come, easy go. Not judgemental. He was strict with the discipline of his own playing, with how he expected you to play, and with the consistency of the swing. But he never said, “You have to be like I want you to be.” He taught the value of integrity and the power of choosing to have it. 

もし僕が彼を一言で表現するとしたら、「不滅」、という彼のアルバムタイトルの一つを使うでしょう。彼はまさにそのものでしたから。それだけに、彼の死は、僕達全員にとってショックでした。ハーレムのアビシニアンパプテスト教会での追悼集会でのことは、未だに忘れられません。大変な数の元妻達とその子供達が全員参列していました。会はとても和やかな雰囲気で、彼の思い出を肴に、演奏や談笑の華を咲かせたのです。彼が皆から愛されたのは、彼自身が音楽や僕達皆に心を砕いてくれたからにほかなりません。彼の生き様は、ジャズの神髄を体現したものです。それは「安易に手に入れるようなものは、あっけなく失われてしまう」というものです。彼は人を決めつけるようなことをしませんでした。自分の演奏に厳しく、他人への演奏面での要求は安易に妥協せず、スウィングは常にビシッと決める。しかし彼が決して言わなかった一言は「俺の考え通りにやれ」。何事に対しても誠実であることが、どれ程価値があることか、そしてそういう生き方を選ぶことが、どれ程大きな力になることか、彼はそれを教えてくれました。 

 

Recommended Listening 

 

Moanin' 

 

Free for All 

 

A Night at Birdland, Volumes 1 - 3 

 

おススメの銘盤 

 

モーニン 

 

フリー・フォー・オール 

 

バードランド(訳注:ニューヨークの名門ジャズクラブ)の夜 第1集~第3集 

 

 

ORNETTE COLEMAN 

オーネット・コールマン 

(訳注:原書出版時2008年の7年後に逝去) 

 

A few years ago I ran across Ornette Coleman in a music store. We talked for a while and then he told me, “Don't go back.” Now, it was interesting he would say that, because he himself starts from way back. He exists outside the liner history of the music, at once ahead of his time and way behind it, before jazz began. He plays the way someone might have played before people figured out how to improvise on harmonies, back when they just played melodies and vocal effects. His music is a great tool for teaching improvisation to younger kids because it's rich in melodic content and it doesn't require you to know harmony.  

数年前に偶然にも、オーネット・コールマンに、とあるミュージックストアで出くわした時のこと。ひとしきり話をした後、彼が僕に言った意外な一言「後戻りするなよ」。というのも、彼自身の音楽の原点が、ずっと古い時代にあるからです。彼は音楽の歴史の流れから外れた存在であり、時代の先駆者であり、そしてずっと古い時代、それもジャズが生まれる前の頃にベースがあります。彼の演奏方法は、コード進行に従ってインプロバイズする方法が確立される以前、メロディと装飾音型だけで演奏していた時代のものなのです。メロディのネタが豊富で、ハーモニーのことを知らなくてもできることから、彼の音楽は、幼い子供達がインプロバイゼーションを学ぶ上で大変良い教材になるのです。 

 

He originally based his style on Charlie Parker's. You can hear that in his early tunes like “Bird Food.” But he was looking to play with the gestural diversity of talking. He also has a characteristic cry. The title of one of his most haunting songs, “Lonely Woman,” also evokes his unmistakable sound. He is a supreme melodist, maybe the most melodic musician in jazz history. He intelligently constructed a style that showcased rapidly changing emotional states instead of changing harmonies. 

元々彼はチャーリー・パーカーのスタイルを基礎にしていました。初期の楽曲「バード・フード」などに、それを垣間見ることが出来ます。しかし彼は、努めて、人が話をする際につける仕草の変化を、演奏に反映しようとしました。また、彼は、むせび泣くような演奏の仕方を特徴としています。彼の、最も物悲しくて頭に残る楽曲「寂しい女」は、同時に彼にしかないサウンドを聞かせてくれます。彼は超一流の、メロディを主とする音楽家であり、ジャズの歴史上No.1ではないかと思われます。彼が音楽を組み立てるスタイルは、知的であり、ハーモニーを変化させることなく、目まぐるしく変わってゆく人の心の様子を、音に描いて見せたのです。 

 

For a time, he stuck to traditional forms, mainly blues and rhythm changes, but he soon abandoned them altogether in favor of pure improvising without bar lines ― just a free flow of melody. As a young man, he lived for a while in New Orleans. One of his great drummers, Ed Blackwell, played with my father in the 1950s. Blackwell said Ornette would tell him not to play in four- or eight-bar phrases. Always searching for a more spontaneous and actual interaction, he would say, “Don't finish my phrases, man,” because he was not playing in even-numbered groups of bars. He was playing in one. 

一時彼は、伝統的な形式、主に変化をつけたブルースとリズムに固執していたことがありました。しかし間もなく彼は、フレーズの区切りにこだわらずに、純粋にインプロバイズしてゆくために、その両方ともいっぺんに排除してしまったのです。こうして、ひたすら自由に流れてゆくメロディ、というスタイルが出来上がりました。若い頃、彼は一時期ニューオーリンズに住んでいました。彼のカルテットにいた名ドラム奏者であるエド・ブラックウェルは、1950年代に僕の父と一緒に演奏活動をしていました。ブラックウェルによると、オーネットは彼に対し、4小節/8小節だのといったフレーズの区切り方をするな、とよく言っていたそうです。常に、より自然に湧き上がってくるような、実生活での人間同士の意志のやり取りを演奏の中にも求めていて、偶数単位と決めてフレーズを演奏していなかった彼は、「俺のフレーズを終わらせるな」とよく言っていました。彼には1小節毎が、あくまでも区切りだ、というわけです。 

 

His style was innovative because the playing of free-flowing melodic ideas discourages the ad nauseam regurgitation of melodic cliches that fit common harmonic patterns. It was restrictive, however, because harmony is one of the four great avenues of musical expression (the other three are rhythm, melody, and texture), and one of the greatest challenges in jazz improvisation is creating new melodies through harmonic progressions. Ornette challenged the significance of that skill. Many of his avant-garde disciples lacked his melodic gifts and familiarity with the blues. They never developed the ability to play harmony and ended up imitating the free improvisation of European concert music. The confusion between jazz improvisation and free improvisation intensified after Ornette's emergence and led some respected writers to actually believe that Europeans were now the real jazz innovators for improvising in their own non-blues-based tradition. 

彼のスタイルは何が革新的なのか。それは、メロディを自由に流し続けることで、一般的なコードのパターンにはまってしまい、使い古されたような感じのするメロディが、クドクド繰り返されるのをのを防ぐことが出来るからです。ところがこれは、プレーヤーにとっては足枷なのです。というのも、コードといえば、音楽表現をする上での4本柱の一つだからです(残りの3つは、リズム、メロディ、そしてテクスチャ[質感])。そしてコード進行に乗って新しくメロディを創ってゆくことは、ジャズのインプロバイゼーションにおける最も大きな挑戦だからです。このスキルの重要性に対し、一石を投じたのが、オーネットであるわけです。彼の後進の多くは、彼の様なメロディに対する才能やブルースに関する十分な知識は持ち合わせていませんでした。オーネットが活躍し始めてからというもの、ジャズのインプロバイゼーションとフリーインプロバイゼーションが混同される傾向が強まり、そして「まともな」と思われているライター達の中には、ヨーロッパの方が旧来のブルース形式にとらわれずインプロバイゼーションをするという点で、真のジャズの革新派である、などと本気で信じ込む者が出てくる始末。 

 

Over the years, Ornette has maintained the same style of playing. Every now and then he creeps over into the European avant-garde. But he still has that heartbreak in his sound, that genius for blue melodies, and that fire and rhythmic danceability over swing rhythms that make him a jazzman at heart. 

数年来、オーネットは同じ演奏スタイルを維持し続けています。時々ヨーロッパのアヴァンギャルド的な手法に手を出すことはありますが、哀愁漂うサウンド、天才的なブルースのメロディ、炎のように熱く、そして自然と体が動き出すスウィングのリズムといったものが、彼を根っからのジャズマンだと説明しています。 

 

He teaches the power of empathy. When you're talking to him, you feel that, somehow, he already knows all of what you are saying and can see and respond to its deeper meaning. He listens so well that you wonder, “Damn, how does he know that much of what I'm feeling?” Ornette hears all the nuances and is attentive to every little scrap of information, every gesture. He teaches us to pay attention to underlying details. Somebody raises his eyebrows ― that's in his playing. Somebody wants to glance at his watch but doesn't do it because he is conversing with someone he respects. He doesn't want the other person to think he is bored, so he is caught between listening and glancing. Ornette Coleman can play that, too. He can interpret the subtleties of our interactions more completely than any other jazz musician ever has. 

彼は、共感的理解の大切さを教えてくれます。彼に話を聞いてもらっている時に感じるのは、こちらの言いたいことが既に理解できていて、そしてこちらの言う事をしっかり把握し、その深い意図に反応してくれている、ということです。本当によく耳を傾けてくれるので、「どうやってこちらの思っていることがわかってくれるのだろう?」と感心してしまいます。オーネットは、こちらが話すそのニュアンスを全て感じ取り、どんな小さな情報も、どんな表情仕草も、すべて把握しようとします。その姿勢からは、表にでない細やかなことまで注意を払う大切さを、教えられます。誰かが思わず眉をひそめる。彼はそれを音にして見せます。目上の人と会話中、時計を見たいけれど、話に興味がないと思わせたら失礼かな、と心が葛藤する。彼はそんな気分をも音にして見せます。オーネット・コールマンとは、他のどのジャズミュージシャンよりも、人とのやり取りの中に生まれるわずかな心の揺らぎをも、完璧に音にできるミュージシャンなのです。 

 

He can hear what you're playing, too. I know that from going to his house and playing with him. Many times when you are speaking a musical language, you become frustrated because your colleagues don't understand what you're saying. You leave spaces and there is no appropriate response. You play softly. They play loudly. You play polyrhythms. They barge ahead. You ask after a solo, “What was I playing?” They say, “Huh?” Ornette not only heard what I was playing, he heard what I was thinking about playing. His way of improvising often tells us much more than the approach of many musicians who have a more complete knowledge of music. Ornette shows us that genius is not bound to orthodoxy. You can be a genius any kind of way. 

彼は他人の演奏をしっかり聞くことが出来る人です。それは僕が彼の家に行って一緒に演奏した時に知ったことです。どうしても音楽という言葉は、相手が話を分かってもらえず、イライラする代物です。話を振っても、キチンと返ってこない。こちらが小さく吹いても、相手は大きく吹いてくる。こちらがポリリズム(複合リズム)を演奏しているのに、相手はドタバタ突進するだけ。こちらがソリストに「おい、バックを聞いてたのかよ?」と訊けば、相手は「え?なに?」と返すだけ。その点、彼のインプロバイズのやり方は、他の頭デッカチなその他大勢のミュージシャンなんかよりも、よほど勉強になります。オーネットは教えてくれます。才能とは通説を極めることではなく、どこからでも喰い漁って行けばいいんだ、と。 

 

Recommended Listening 

 

The Shape of Jazz to Come 

 

Ornette! 

 

Change of the Century 

 

おススメの銘盤 

 

ジャズ 来るべきもの 

 

オーネット! 

 

世紀の転換