英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:5章(前半)Moving to Higher Ground by W. Marsalis

5. CHAPTER FIVE 

第5章

 

The Great Coming-Together 

仲良きことは美しき哉 

 

Swing dancing ― the highest possible vertical expression of horizontal aspirations. 

<写真脚注> 

スウィングダンス:誰もが心に抱く願いを、立場を越えて表現する最高の方法 

 

 

One time, when we were playing in Kansas City, Missouri, Governor Bob Holden invited us to lunch. It just so happened that lunch coincided with a very important University of Missouri basketball game. To be honest, we wanted to stay in the hotel and watch the game. When we got to the governor's mansion, in Jefferson City, I noticed something in the governor's eyes that told me he, too, would have been watching the game if we hadn't turned up. I very gingerly asked him if he was a basketball fan. He brightened up right away. “Come on, man,” he said. “The game is on upstairs.”  

ミズーリ州カンザスシティで公演を行った時のことです。ボブ・ホールデン知事が僕達一行を昼食に招待してくださったのですが、丁度その時刻に、ミズーリ大学のバスケットボールチームが、大一番の試合を控えているところでした。正直、ホテルで観戦したかった、と思いつつ、ジェファーソンシティの知事邸に到着。ところが知事の方も全く同じことを、何となく目が訴えているように僕には見えたので、恐る恐る「ところで知事は、バスケットボールは御覧になったりしますか?」と訊ねてみました。思った通り、彼はすぐ満面の笑顔で「よくぞ言ってくれました!ささ、2階へ。試合が始まりますよ。」 

We saw the game, then came down to eat. We talked, and he told me he came from a small town in which there were no black citizens. As a kid, he had developed some unusual illness that put him in the same hospital room with a black kid his own age who suffered from the same sickness. They got to know and like each other. It sounded like just another “Negroes I know” story to me until the governor looked at me and said, “We all know black and white folks. The question I have for you is why are we always reduced to telling these cliched stories? Why is mutual recognition and discovery of community never the national story?” 

テレビ観戦が終わり、下の階で食事ということになりました。会話の中で、知事が子供の頃仲良くなった黒人の子の話をしてくれました。知事の生まれた小さな町には、黒人の住民が一人もいなかったとのこと。ある時、重病を患い入院した先で、同い年で同じ病気で入院していたその子と同室になったそうです。「ああ、また『私の知り合いの黒人』話か・・・」と思ったのも束の間、知事の次の言葉に、僕はハッとしたのでした。「今更、黒人も白人もなく仲間のはずなのに、こんなような聞くのもウンザリな話題ばかりで、いつも会話が弾む羽目になってしまう。お互い知り合いになっただの、仲間の輪ができただの、こういう話がいつまでたっても『この国全体がそうなった』にならない。皆さん、どうしてなんでしょうね?」 

 

A couple of years later, Louisiana State University won the national football championship and Southern University won the championship of the black Southwestern Athletic Conference. Two schools from the same town. Baton Rouge went crazy. A jubilant Wess Anderson called me from right in the middle of the daylong celebration that culminated in both marching bands playing the national anthem together on the steps of the state capitol. “Certainly, you'll see it on the evening news,” he said, laughing. We agreed there was no way it would be covered unless a riot broke out. We did not see it on the news. And no one remembers it. 

数年後のこと。ルイジアナ州の州都バトンルージュは、同市の二つの大学の快挙に熱狂していました。ルイジアナ州立大学が全米フットボール選手権優勝、サザン大学が南西部黒人インカレ総合優勝を、同時に果たしたのです。大喜び一杯のヴェス・アンダーソンが、僕に電話をくれました。彼が電話をかけてきたところは、一日がかりの祝賀イベントの真っ只中で、その最高潮に達したのが、両校のマーチングバンドによる州議事堂入口階段での国歌合同演奏でした。「こりや、今夜のニュースはこれできまりだね」彼は笑ってこう言いました。この後、暴動でも起きない限り、この合同演奏がニュースにならないわけないだろうと、僕達は二人ともそう思いました。なのに結局、ニュースにはならず、後に人々の記憶から消えてしまったのです。 

 

 

The kind of mutual recognition and discovery of community that the governor called for and that those marching bands blaring side by side on the state capitol steps represented is an essential element of jazz. It's as if the music were engineered to expose the hypocrisy and absurdity of racism in our country. 

ホールデン知事が望む「国全体が『知り合い、仲間になった』であるとか、バトンルージュの州議事堂階段で肩寄せ合って歌い上げた、二校のマーチングバンドといったものが示すもの、これがジャズの本質的な要素なのです。まるでジャズは、この国における人種差別の偽善や不条理をさらけ出すために創られたようにすら、思えてなりません。 

 

Each colonial power created different social circumstances for the people it conquered. The French mixed and mingled. The Spanish mixed and murdered. The English mixed and made believe they didn't. Armed with logic, law, and a Christian mandate “in the name of Jesus,” they all administered a tough brand of salvation. There were African slaves almost everywhere in the New World, but in the United States the slave was a shackled counterbalancee to the personal freedoms that defined America. He was written into the Constitution as three-fifths of a man. His bondage was so lucrative that it became a national enterprise and cast a shadow over the spiritual identity of the country. It still does. 

かつて植民地政策を敷いた国々は、征服した人々に対して創り用意した社会環境が、それぞれ異なっています。本国の人々と征服された国の人々について、フランスは混在させ同化させた。スペインは混在させ抹殺した。イギリス人は混在させるも、それがイギリス人によるものではない、と信じ込ませたのです。つまり、理論や法、そして「イエスの御名の下に」というキリスト教の決め台詞でガチガチに固め、「神の救済」と言う名の苛烈な管理体制を敷いたのでした。アフリカから連れてこられた奴隷達は、南北アメリカ大陸のいたる所に居たものの、USAにおいては、奴隷とは、拘束されるべき人間であり、それによって、アメリカの象徴たる「個人の自由」がバランスよく保たれるよう仕向けられました。奴隷は、合衆国憲法において、「一人」とは数えられず、「3/5人」と数えられるよう規定されたのです。彼らを奴隷の状態のままにしておくことによる経済効果は絶大であったため、やがて国家全体として行うことになってゆきます。同時に、アメリカの精神的アイデンティティに暗い影を落とすことになり、それは今なお続いています。 

 

 

Even a bloody Civil War and an unfinished civil rights movement one hundred years later have not resolved the problems caused by the legacy of owning people in the land of the free and by the segregation that followed emancipation. Slavery compromised our political system, our financial integrity, our morality, and our cultural life. We espoused all this idealism, all this morality, and all these noble core concepts: equal justice for all, “all men are created equal,” and so on. I guess all sounded better than some. 

国歌で「自由の大地」と歌い上げられるこの国で、人を「所有物」として扱ったことの名残、そして、奴隷制度廃止の後に始まった人種差別、こういったことによって引き起こされた様々な問題は、多くの犠牲者を出した南北戦争や、その100年後に発生し、今なお決着のつかない公民権運動があったにもかかわらず、未だに解決されないままです。奴隷制度は、その後のアメリカの政治体制、金融体制、倫理観、そして憲法で崇高に謳われる中心的概念「全ての人々に平等な正義」「全ての人々は平等に創られている」云々、こういったものを作る上で影響を残しました。「全ての」:いい言葉ですよね。「一部の」なんかよりも。 

 

Here comes the problem. Jazz ― America's greatest artistic contribution to the world ― was created by people who were freed from slavery, people who were the very least of society. Now, that's happened in other cultures, too. Brazil, for example. In The Masters and the Slaves: A Study in the Development of Brazilian Civilization, Gilberto Freyre identified the national significance of the samba. Because the samba defined the Brazilian spirit, it should be considered a definitive national music, he asserted, and because it came in part from Africa, to be Brazilian was therefore to be part African. 

ここで僕から問題提起を一つ。ジャズと言えば、アメリカが世界にもたらした最も偉大な芸術です。これを創ったのは、かつて奴隷制度から解放され、社会の「最少数派」とされていた人々です。ところで、これと同じことは、アメリカ以外の社会でも発生していたのです。例えばブラジル。社会学者のジルベルト・フレイレは、著作「大邸宅と奴隷小屋:ブラジルの市民社会発達についての考察」の中で、サンバが持つ国民全体にとっての重要性について着目しています。サンバはブラジル人の精神そのものであり、国民的音楽として絶対視されるべきものだ、と彼は述べています。そしてサンバの原点がアフリカの一地方にあるというなら、ブラジル人である、ということは、一部アフリカ人である、というのです。 

 

Freyre wrote this in 1933, at a time when white intellectual circles in the United States just could not bring themselves to accept the Negro in any serious central to our common heritage. We have paid a heavy cultural price for that oversight.  

フレイレがこの本を書いた1933年、当時アメリカの有識者団体はどこも、黒人をキチンとした形で受け入れようとすることが出来ていませんでした。こんな調子でしたから、アメリカを代表する音楽(ジャズ)は、アメリカ国民が分かち合う伝統文化の中心にあるとは、到底見なされません。 

 

Jazz is not race music. All kinds of people play it and listen to it. They always have. But you can't teach the history of jazz without talking in depth about segregation, white bands and black bands, racism, sex, media, and the American way. We still tend to look at things in black and white. Martin Luther King, Jr., is seen as a leader for blacks, even though he led Americans of many kinds and colors. The civil rights movement is perceived as a black movement when it was really a national movement toward a national goal: actualizing the Constitution. So, too, with jazz. 

ジャズとは、ある特定の人種の為の音楽ではありません。全ての人が演奏し、そして聴いて楽しむものです。実際人々は、ずっとそうしてきています。しかしジャズのこれまでの歩みを人に伝える上では、どうしても深く掘り下げて語らねばならないことが有ります。それは人種隔離、白人/黒人しか在籍していないバンド、人種差別、性差別、メディアの影響、そして「アメリカ人とはかくあるべきだ」という物の考え方です。未だに、黒人か白人か、と言う物事に対する見方がなくならない傾向にあります。マーチン・ルーサー・キングJrは黒人にとっての指導者、と見なされているようですが、彼が導いたのは黒人にとどまらず、多くの人種・肌の色の人々だったのです。公民権運動は黒人解放運動と思われがちですが、実際この国民全員が関わった運動は、アメリカ人皆の目標である、合衆国憲法と言う紙に書かれたことを実現し実行しようということが、その中心にありました。ジャズも全く同じことです。 

 

Even though musicians themselves were segregated, the way they learned music was not. Stan Getz was going to be influenced on the tenor saxophone by the style of whosever music he was attracted to. He was ambitious, he had talent, and he wanted to be the best. Since, in his field, the best was black, he was going to check that out. Miles Davis was influenced Freddie Webster, who was black, and Harry James, who was white. Louis Armstrong's style was influenced, of course, by his mentor Joe “King” Oliver but also by the style of cornet virtuosos such as Bohumir Kryl and Herbert L. Clark. That's how music is. You hear something you like, and you want to play it. What somebody sounded like was much more important that what he or she looked like, especially in the years before television. Our strange obsession with race has devoured most of his history. Instead of focusing on the greater coming-together that jazz represents, the obsession has always been “Who owns this music?” 

ミュージシャン達は、普段の生活の中では差別を受けていましたが、自分達が音楽を学ぶにあたっては、差別など全くありませんでした。白人のテナーサックス奏者、スタン・ゲッツは、自分がこれと思い惚れ込んだプレーヤーの演奏スタイルに影響を受けてゆきます。野心的で才能に恵まれ、頂点を目指した彼にとって、最高のものは黒人プレーヤーによるものだったため、そこに注目してゆきました。マイルス・デイビスが影響を受けたのは、黒人のフレディ・ウェブスターと白人のハリー・ジェームスです。ルイ・アームストロングに影響を与えたのは勿論、彼のメンターであったジョー・「キング」・オリヴァーの演奏スタイルですが、同じ様に白人プレーヤーであったボフミール・カレイルやハーバート・クラークの演奏スタイルからも影響を受けています。これこそが音楽と言うものです。好きなものを耳にしたら、それを自分が演奏してみる。特にテレビなど無かった時代には、プレーヤーの見た目よりサウンドの方が、はるかに大事でしたからね。人種に関する奇妙な思い込みが、歴史に蔓延してしまっているのです。ジャズがもたらしてくれる「共に行こう」という素晴らしい発想は注目されず、いつの時代も「この演奏はどんな人種が行っている」に目が行ってしまうのです。 

 

That obsession is still alive and well in America, still wasting everybody's time, still undercutting the spirit of jazz. 

その思い込みは、今でもアメリカに巣食っていて、人の時間を無駄にし、ジャズの精神を蝕んでいます。 

 

It began early. Because the knowledge and intelligence and human depth of jazz demonstrated so clearly the absurdity of the treatment of black people, there was immediate intellectual pressure to denigrate it. Every avenue was taken. One path was to ignore it: Jazz was created by black people; black people were worthless, so there was no need to take notice of it. Another was to trivialize it by associating it on-screen with cartoons or sex scenes ― jazz was only good as background music for children's programs or “doing the do,” a strange combination that became more closely linked in the video era. You could also make sure it was never taught in institutions. Until the civil rights movement you could actually get expelled from some schools, even Afro-American ones, just for playing jazz in a practice room.  

それは歴史上、早くから見受けられました。ジャズの持つ情報量や知的センス、そして人間性の深みといったものは、黒人に対する不合理な扱いというものを、くっきりと人々に示して見せました。そのため、知識層による誹謗中傷の圧力も、すぐに発生したのです。ありとあらゆる手段がとられました。一つは無視すること。ジャズを創ったのは黒人、黒人は無価値、故にジャズも注目する値なし。もう一つは貶めること。映像スクリーンで漫画だのセックスのシーンだのと一緒に流すことで、ジャズは子供向けの番組か、「18禁」ぐらいでしか、まともに使えない、としてしまう。この奇妙な取り合わせは、ビデオが普及するにつれて更に密接になってゆきました。こうなると正規の教育機関で扱われることなど、ありえない、ということになってしまうでしょう。公民権運動が興るまではずっと、学校現場では、練習室でさえもジャズの演奏をしたら退学処分、といったことが、黒人の子弟が通う学校においてさえも、実際に行われていたのです。 

 

Then, there was patronization and condescension. A standard history of music in the twentieth century holds that there are three major influences: Stravinsky, Schoenberg, and “jazz.” Not Ellington or Armstrong but an entire idiom likened to two individuals in European music. 

その後時代は、ジャズを保護・支援しつつも、積極的には取り上げないという風潮に変わります。音楽史の通説として、20世紀の3大影響力とよく言われるのが、ストラビンスキー、シェーンベルク、そして「ジャズ」。「デューク・エリントン」でも「ルイ・アームストロング」でもない、全体カテゴリーとして、二人のヨーロッパにおける巨人と並べられてしまっているのです。 

 

Sometimes jazz was confused with minstrelsy or lumped in with commercial dance music; in The New York Times today it is still categorized under “Jazz / Pop.” Now it's taught in hundreds of institutions, all around the country, but disconnected from the Afro-American story. (The American story is also ignored, for that matter.) 

よくジャズは、ミンストレルショーのBGMと間違われたり、売上数重視のダンスミュージックと一緒くたにされたりします。ニューヨークタイムズ紙でも、未だに「ジャズ/ポップス」とひとくくりにされる始末。ようやく、全米各地の何百もの教育機関でジャズの教育が行われるようになったものの、あくまでもアフリカ系アメリカ人歴史学習は切り離されてしまっています(そういった意味では、自国の歴史学習自体が、疎かになっているとも言えましょう)。 

 

訳注:ミンストレルショー(minstrel show) 

1840~1880年アメリカで人気のあった演芸。顔を黒く塗った白人が、黒人の口調や動作をまねて歌ったり踊ったり、あるいは喜劇的な演技をする。 

 

There were less obvious cruelly humorous assaults on it, too, like calling New Orleans music “Dixieland,” which managed to identify it with the Confederacy's battle hymn: “You play about freedom but we'll make it an homage to your enslavement.” And there are the direct modern assaults on what are thought to be the brown-skinned elements of the music by those who denigrate the blues and hold that swing ― the rhythm that defines jazz ― is archaic, regardless of how it's played. This forwards the notion that we've innovated ourselves into European art music or some poorly played melange of Latin-Indian-African music. 

ジャズに対する強い攻撃も行われています。それも、ハッキリとは言わないけれど、残酷なほどに人を小バカにするようなやり方で。例えばニューオーリンズの音楽を「ディキシーランド」などと呼びますが、これは南北戦争以前の、奴隷制を維持していた南部連邦の軍歌と結びつけようとする意図が現れています。「自由を謳歌するヤツには奴隷の鎖を」。そして現在は、強い攻撃はハッキリと行われています。「いわゆる」と前置きして、褐色の肌をした音楽の類、と称し、ブルースをこき下ろし、ジャズの命たる「スウィング」は、どう演奏されようが、もはや過去の遺物だ、と言い放つのです。こういう物の見方が増長する認識というのが、ジャズは革新を遂げてヨーロッパの芸術としての音楽の一翼を担うようになっただの、あるいは、いい加減に演奏されるラテン、インド、アフリカのゴチャ混ぜ音楽へ「進化した」だのというものです。 

 

One of the most insidious attacks on the music came from people who saw themselves as its friends. Jazz arouse, the hipsters said, from spontaneous feeling. Anybody can do it, Allen Ginsberg wrote. “Just pick up a horn and blow.” If that's the case, of course, jazz has developed at random and has no aesthetic objectives other than freedom. 

ジャズに対する最も狡猾な攻撃の一つを行っているのは、自らを「ジャズの友達」と称する人達です。「進んだ物の見方をする人達」を自負する人達が言うには、ジャズは自然発生的に生まれた、とのこと。アレン・ジンスバーグによれば、ジャズは「誰だって演奏できる。ラッパを持って吹けばいいんだ」。当然、もしそれが本当だというなら、ジャズの発展には系統的なものは何もなく、そして黒人の自由解放以外には何の美学的目的もない、ということになってしまいます。 

 

The “modern equivalent of the beatnik philosophy is the contemporary hipster's love of “all” music. The party line goes: “I like everything. What is jazz, anyway? Whether something is jazz or not makes no difference.” The music has no meaning for those cognoscenti. And if something doesn't have meaning, you can't teach it. The no-meaning, no-definition philosophy so successfully attacks the central nervous system of education that you don't even need the other approaches to prevent future generations from playing, enjoying, and being nourished by this music. 

1950年代のビート派の物の考え方、これの現代版が、現在の新しもの好き達による「全ての音楽を愛する」という発想です。その方針はこうです。「私は音楽は何でも好きだ。だからジャズとは何か、なんて関係ない。これはジャズだとか、これはジャズではないとか、どうでもいいことだ」。耳の肥えた優秀な方々にとっては、ジャズの意味などと言うものは存在しない、ということでしょうか。となると、意味のないものは人には教えられない、ということになります。意味も定義もこの音楽にはない、と言う考え方のおかげで、ジャズの教育における精神面での中核は、木っ端微塵にされてしまい、将来ジャズを演奏し、楽しみ、ジャズで人を育てる道は不要だ、ということになってしまっているのです。 

 

Homer was famous for just two books, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Yet the Greeks agreed there was so much in them that for centuries they interpreted and reinterpreted those texts, seeking a clearer understanding of what it was to be Greek ― and to be human. Jazz can provide the same panorama of insights for Americans ― or it could if Americans were encouraged to understand it. There's very little argument anymore about its central place in our national heritage. Yet, Americans don't seem able to agree on something as basic as a definition of jazz.  

ホメロスは、たった二冊の著作で歴史に名を刻みました。「イリヤド」と「オデッセイ」です。それでも、ギリシャ人の共通認識としては、この二冊に込められた内容は膨大であり、だからこそ彼らは何世紀にもわたって、この二冊の読みこなしを繰り返し、ギリシャ人であるとはどういうことか、ひいては、人間であるとはどういうことか、について、少しでも明確な理解の仕方を求め続けているのです。ジャズも、これと同じく、アメリカ人であるとはどういうことか、についての洞察に、展望を与えてくれます。そこまでではないにしても、アメリカ人に理解するよう促せば、そうなる可能性を秘めています。我が国の伝統において、アメリカ人とは何か、についての核心に関する議論は、もはや殆ど行われていません。そして依然としてアメリカ人は、ジャズの定義と同じ位基本的なことについて、皆が合意できていないように思えます。 

 

 

 

We now have such a poor relationship to jazz that the world has become less precise than it was when the music was invented. Now, no one knows what it is, really. We've gone from kind of knowing something about it, through years of playing and discussing it, to concluding that it has no real meaning. The result is that we can't teach it, because no one can figure out when you're not playing it. We work hard to make it as mysterious and obscure as possible, as if hiding it will keep us from confronting some important truth about our way of life. There's a secret: jazz. 

今や私達は、ジャズとの関わり合いが非常に貧弱です。ジャズと言う言葉も、これに伴い、この音楽が生まれた頃と比べると、きちんとした定義を持たなくなってきてしまっています。ジャズについて、何かを知ろうとするところから始まって、年月をかけて演奏し議論を重ねるうちに、結論としてこの言葉には、実体のある意味がない、ということになってしまいます。これにより、ジャズは人に教えられないモノ、とされる始末。なにせ、ジャズなんか演奏しない、とうのであれば、ジャズを理解するなど出来るはずがありません。努力した挙句、とことん謎めいて不明確になってしまったなんて、まるでジャズの本当の姿を隠すことによって、私達の生きる道に関する重要な真実に向き合わせない、かのようです。ここにあるものは秘密の代物、それがジャズです。 

 

Rock and roll has a meaning. Hip-hop, salsa, samba, tango ― they all conjure up a distant sound. But nowadays, jazz is misconstrued as all of them, or none, or … who knows? But if the music is to mean something to Americans, then its various components must reflect aspects of our way of life. Individual sounds are important, but so is the sound of the group. The process of many becoming one on a bandstand is similar to the path taken by a Korean or Nigerian immigrant when becoming an American. They have to want to be. The process of swinging ― of constant coordination with things that are changing all time ― is modern life in a free society. But above all else, it is a choice. 

ロックンロールには意味があります。ヒップホップやサルサ、サンバ、そしてタンゴといったものは全て、それぞれ独自のサウンドを思い起こさせます。しかし今日、ジャズは、こういう音楽の総称なのか、はたまたどれにも当てはまらないのか、良く分からなくなっていて、正しく理解されていません。しかしもしもこの音楽が、アメリカ人にとって何かしら意味があるものなら、そこにある様々な要素は、私達の生活の在り様に見られる様々な側面を反映しているはずです。個々サウンドは重要ですが、アンサンブル全体としてのサウンドも重要です。ステージ上で大勢の演奏が一つに「なってゆく」その過程は、朝鮮人にしろナイジェリア人にしろ、移民がアメリカ人に「なってゆく」道のりに似ています。「なってゆく」ことを望まなくてはいけないのです。スウィングすることの過程とは、常に変化している物事に対して、常に調子を合わせる過程と同じであり、、自由が保証されている社会における今風の生き方です。と言ってもそれを選択する/しないは、その人次第です。 

 

 

Another obsession born of racism is the endless search for the answer to an essentially pointless question: Who does this music belong to? To try to answer it, you have to engage in the futility of deciding which color of person plays it best. Well, if Louis Armstrong was the best and he was dark-skinned, then jazz must be the province of the dark-skinned Negro. But who is the next dark-skinned person who plays as well as Louis Armstrong? And are there some light-skinned musicians and some white ones ― Bix Beiderbecke, for example ― who are better than the next dark-skinned trumpet player in line? Who is the dark-skinned soprano saxophone player who plays better than the light-skinned Creole Sidney Bechet? Nobody. What percentage of black blood do you have to have to qualify? What about Django Reinhardt? He's a gypsy from Belgium. 

人種差別が産んだ別の強迫観念によって、いつまでも答えを探そうとする羽目になる、本質的にポイントのずれた問題が、「この音楽は誰のものか」です。答えようものなら、肌の色が何色が一番上手か決めよう、などという無益な取り組みをしなくてはならなくなります。要するに、ルイ・アームストロングが一番で、肌の色が濃い目なら、ジャズは黒っぽい肌をした黒人の縄張りだろう、ということになります。しかし、となると、ルイ・アームストロングと同じレベルの黒人は他に誰だ、と言う話です。そしてその人と肩を並べる有色人種、はたまたビックス・バイダーベックのような白人達はいるのか?有色人種である「クレオール」であるシドニー・ベシェより上手な黒人人種のソプラノサックス奏者は誰か?そんな人はいません。「黒人人種」と認められる血の濃さは?ジャンゴ・レインハルトはどうなる?ちなみに彼は、ベルギー出身のジプシーですがね。 

 

What makes a person an authentic jazz musician? Does he or she have to be black and descended from slaves? If that's the case, what about all the black jazz musicians who couldn't play as well as white musicians like Jack Teagarden or Buddy Rich? They weren't black enough? If that's the case, are certain fields ― like competitive swimming or orchestral music ― overwhelmingly dominated by whites because blacks just can't compete? Or is it the cultural conditioning that makes groups of people comfortable with a reductive vision of what they can and cannot do? “For some inbred reasons out of your control, you won't make it, so don't even try.” In the NBA, European players fare better than white Americans do. Is it because their skin is less white or because cultural acceptance of black players' innate superiority is not a part of their upbringing? 

本物のミュージシャンだ、という決め手は何か?肌が黒くて先祖が奴隷であることが必要条件か?となると、ジャック・ティーガーデンやバディ・リッチのような白人ミュージシャンと同じレベルの演奏が出来ていない黒人ジャズミュージシャン達はどうなんでしょうか?「十分黒人とは言えない」ということか?となると、ある特定の分野 - 例えば競泳や管弦楽など - で圧倒的に白人が強いのは、黒人に単に競争力がないからなのか?それとも自分の能力に対して狭い料簡を持つことに甘んじてしまうのは、文化の置かれている状況のせいなのか?「生まれつきなんだから、自分じゃどうしようもない。やっても無理なんだから、やるなよ」アメリカのプロバスケットボールの世界では、同じ白人でも外国人であるヨーロッパの選手の方が活躍しています。肌の白さが足りないからか?アメリカの白人選手は、黒人選手の持って生まれた優れた点に対して、これを受け入れようとする文化的背景を育まずに育ってきたからなのか? 

 

On the other side of the coin, the Negro was conditioned to accept and expect less for so long, it became a way of life. In the early days, black people were so completely segregated and suppressed that there was never even the opportunity to sense freedom. For jazz musicians, the first chance to feel equal ― and even superior ― came when white and black musicians began playing together after hours. Social order on the bandstand is determined by ability. Therefore, people like Coleman Hawkins and Rex Stewart were idolized by musicians of all races. 

別の見方をすれば、黒人はこういった扱いを受け入れるよう、国全体でお膳立てが成され、長い間に亘って状況が好転することなど望み薄にされ、それが黒人の生きる道となってしまったのです。当初黒人に対する差別と抑圧は、あまりにも完璧で、「自由」などというものは感じ取ることすらありえないことでした。ジャズミュージシャン達にとって、「平等」として「優越感」といったものを初めて実感したのは、白人達と黒人達がオフの時間に、一緒に演奏するようになってからです。舞台上では序列は実力主義。だからこそ、コールマン・ホーキンスやレックス・ステュワートといった人達が、人種に関係なくミュージシャン達からリスペクトされていたのです。 

 

Jazzmen such as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, and Duke Ellington began to go to Europe, where they were treated like human beings off the bandstand, as well. They experienced a kind of freedom Afro-Americans didn't enjoy at home. They could have relations and relationships with any type of woman and, of course, because they were musicians, all kinds of women found them interesting. When they returned to America they were lionized and walked with a certain swagger. They dressed well and had their own way of speaking. They earned decent money and played what they wanted to play. These men began to understand that, around the world, their music had come to stand for democracy and freedom. 

ルイ・アームストロング、、シドニー・ベシェ、そしてデューク・エリントンといったようなジャズ奏者達が向かい始めたヨーロッパというところは、舞台上でなくても彼らが普通の人間として扱いを受ける地です。彼らがかの地で享受した自由は、アフリカ系アメリカ人が本国では決して味わえないモノでした。彼らはどんな女性達とも、交流を持ち、男女の関係を許され、そして勿論ミュージシャンである彼らに対し、どんな女性達も関心を寄せたのです。彼らは凱旋の後、もてはやされ、世の中を闊歩するようになりました。小奇麗に着飾り、好きなように振る舞い、稼ぎも増えて、自分達の演奏したいものを演奏しました。世界では自分達の音楽は、民主主義と自由を意味するようになっていたことを、彼らは理解し始めたのです。 

 

The resilience and fortitude of true American pioneers is in that music. And it's in it for the black and the white musician. But back home, onstage and even in the recording studio, they were still separated. Among black people of consciousness there was always deep resentment that couldn't be wiped away with a smile and a “Yassah.” The more conscious they were, the madder it made them. The more education they had, the angrier they became. This continued injustice diminished their enjoyment of life. These people dedicated their skills and energy to undoing the system that so soured their public experiences. 

ジャズの中に在るものは、アメリカの開拓者達の活力と不屈の精神、そしてそれは、黒人と白人両方のミュージシャンのものです。でもこの国では、舞台上でも、そしてレコーディングスタジオの中でさえ、依然として分離された状態でした。意識の高い黒人達の間では、愛想笑いと「イェッサー!」の一言では拭い切れない、深い憤りの念が、常にあったのです。意識が高くなるほど、彼らの憤りは増幅されてゆきました。しっかりとした教育を受けるほど、怒りは激しくなっていったのです。このように公正でない状態がいつまでも続くと、生きる喜びが削がれてゆきました。彼らが公共の場で辛酸を舐めさせられた社会構造を、粉砕すべく、こう言った人々は自分達の能力とエネルギーを注ぎ込んだのです。 

 

Writers, publicists, and fans proclaimed Benny Goodman the “king of swing.” Now, he had a damn good band, but even he didn't think that's who he was ― not with Duke Ellington and Count Basie also on the road. Goodman went along with it ― who wouldn't have? ― but it didn't feel right. Now, what if you were a black musician and you wanted and deserved to be the king of swing? Then, it irritated you a lot. Duke Ellington lived through Paul Whiteman being heralded as the king of jazz in the twenties and Benny Goodman being called the king of swing in the thirties. 

文筆家達、出版業者、そして音楽ファンはこぞって、ベニー・グッドマンを「スウィングの王様」と称しました。確かに彼の率いたバンドは、とてつもなく良い楽団でしたが、当の本人は、その様な自覚はありませんでした。それは当時同じく活躍中だったデューク・エリントンカウント・ベイシーについても同じでした。グッドマンはそう呼ばれることを受け入れていました - 受け入れない人などいるわけがありません - しかし自分は相応とは感じていなかったのです。もし皆さんが黒人ミュージシャンだとして、自分はスウィングの王様となるに相応しいと思いたいですか?多分そういう思いは皆さんを大いに困惑させるのではないでしょうか?デューク・エリントンはその生涯の中で、1920年代はポール・ホワイトマンが「ジャズの王様」、1930年代はベニー・グッドマンが「スウィングの王様」と、それぞれ称されていたのです。 

 

 

 

What if you wanted to be in the movies but not as a maid or servant? What if you wanted to sing at the Metropolitan Opera ― and you really had the talent? Then it killed you. A lot of people playing jazz were those kinds of people. 

もし皆さんが映画に出演したい、それもメイドだの召使いだのとしてではなく、出演したいと思ったら、もし皆さんがメトロポリタン歌劇場のステージで歌ってみたいと思ったら、そしてその才能が実際あったとしたら、多分その気持ちは皆さんを押し潰してしまうでしょう。ジャズの演奏家の多くは、そういう人達なのかもしれません。 

 

The whole of jazz, black and white, was a refutation of segregation and racism. The white musicians were some of the least prejudiced people in our county. There's a famous story of a 1926 contest at the Roseland Ballroom in Manhattan between New York's own Fletcher Henderson Orchestra and its white counterpart from the Midwest, led by Jean Goldkette. Scores of musicians gathered for the showdown. Most of them bet on Henderson, whose ranks included Coleman Hawkins, Rex Stewart, and Benny Carter. But Goldkette ― with Frankie Trumbauer and Bix Beiderbecke ― carried the day. 

黒人にとっても白人にとっても、ジャズは全て、人種の隔離や差別は間違えていると訴える術でした。白人のミュージシャン達は、我が国では、最も偏見を持たれない人達の部類に入っていたのです。有名な話を一つ。1926年、マンハッタンのローズランドボールホールで開かれたバンドコンテストは、地元ニューヨークのフレッチャー・ヘンダーソン・オーケストラと、中西部から来た白人で構成されるジョン・ゴールドケット率いる楽団との対決でした。ミュージシャン達の点数が集計されました。蓋を開けて見れば、大半の票が投じられたのはヘンダーソンオーケストラ - コールマン・ホーキンス、レックス・ステュワート、そしてベニー・カーターを擁する - だったものの、ゴールドケットの楽団 - こちらはフランキー・バウアーとビックス・バイダーベックを擁する - が結局勝利します。 

 

“They creamed us,” Rex Stewart remembered. “Those little tight-ass white boys creamed us.” But both leaders had listened intently to the other's band, and after the battle Goldkette hired Henderson's top arranger, Don Redman, and Henderson commissioned Goldkette's arranger, Bill Challis. The next time the two bands met they battled to a draw. 

「完敗だった」とレックス・ステュワートは当時を振り返ります。「あいつら生真面目な白人のボーヤ達には負けたよ」。しかし双方のリーダー共、相手の演奏にしっかり耳を傾けていて、このコンテストの後、ゴールドケットはヘンダーソンオーケストラの首席アレンジャーであるドン・レッドマンに、ヘンダーソンはゴールドケットの楽団のメンバーで、やはりアレンジャーのビル・シャリスに、それぞれ仕事の依頼をしています。両バンドは再び相見え、その時は引き分けています。 

 

Now, that's a beautiful story because it details the triumph of the underdog white musicians, the black musicians admitting they'd been outplayed, and both leaders being more interested in music than race. But what happened time and again when Negro won? He was denied, or his victory was attributed to his “natural talent.” 

さてこのように、圧倒的不利と目された白人バンドが大勝し、これに黒人ミュージシャン達が潔く兜を脱ぎ、双方のリーダーは相手の人種よりも音楽に注目したという美談ではありますが、もし黒人バンドが連戦連勝となったろどうなるのでしょう?きっと勝ちを認められない、若しくは「元々黒人には勝てっこない」と片付けられるか、でしょうね。 

 

Jazz exposed the good ol' American tradition of racial injustice. Musicians would have been stupid not to know it and feel it and be embittered by it. Generations of people had been victimized in the most profound and petty ways, from being hanged from trees to being forced to call a child “Mr.” So-and-so. But, even though musicians felt the sting of racism even more acutely because their connection to art made them more insightful, most did not say. “This is some bullshit so let's re-create some more of it.” Instead, jazz musicians concluded, “This is some pure D bullshit. Let's not re-create that in any way.” 

ジャズは、「古き良きアメリカの伝統」となってしまった人種差別が、不当であることをさらけ出して見せたのです。ミュージシャン達は、恐らく、そして愚かなことに、そうとは知らず、そしてそう感じることもなく、憂うこともしなかったのかもしれません。何世代にも亘り、人々が犠牲となっていった根深い傷を残すも手間のかからない仕打ち、それらは、木に吊るされることだったり、白人の子供を「ミスター〇〇」と呼ばされたり、等々。それなのにミュージシャン達は、芸術活動に携わる中で物を見る力を研ぎ澄ませてゆくことで、人種差別がもたらす苦情を更にヒシヒシと感じていたにも拘らず、「これは実にあってはならないことだ、あちこちに発信してゆこうじゃないか」とは言わず、「これは実際に有り得ないことだ、あちこちに発信しないでおこうじゃないか」と収めてしまったのです。 

 

Most of my own anger about racism came from growing up in Kenner during and after the civil rights movement. It felt a bad, bad taste in my mouth, and I expressed it. But all of the great jazzmen I knew, from Art Blakey to John Lewis to Walter Davis, Jr., believed people were simply people. I'll never forget how Art Blakey got on me for speaking disrespectfully about alto saxophone player Phil Woods. And he was right. At some point all of that has got to stop. And you don't have to kiss anybody's behind to be a part of stopping it. When you really get to the philosophy of Monk or Charlie Parker, they were not trying to say that the black man was greater than the white man; they were saying, “By being for everyone, our music absolutely refutes the racism that poisons our national life.” 

人種差別に対する僕の怒りの大半は、ケナーで育った頃に由来します。時代は公民権運動に最盛期からその後にかけて、といったところ。僕にとって本当に酷い思いがするものであり、僕はそれを演奏で表現しました。しかしこれに対し、僕が縁を持ったジャズの大御所達は全て、アート・ブレイキーからジョン・ルイス、ウォルター・デイビスJrまで、人間は人間でしかない、それ以上も以下もない、と信じていたのです。ある時僕がアルトサックス奏者のフィル・ウッズのことについて、失礼なモノの言いようで語った時に、僕を叱ったアート・ブレイキーの様子を、僕は決して忘れることはないでしょう。彼の言う通り、あらゆる憎悪はどこかで終わらせなければなりません。そしてそれを終わらせる一助となろうとするなら、誰にこびへつらう必要はないのです。本当にモンクやチャーリー・パーカーの域に達しようとするなら、彼らは断じて黒人の白人に対する優越感に言及せず、「私達の音楽は全ての人の為のモノとなることによって、我が国の在り様を台無しにする人種差別を完全に否定するようになる」と言ったことを忘れてはなりません。 

 

Dizzy Gillespie told me, “Bebop was about integration.” He said that his and Charlie Parker's objective was to be integrated. Dizzy told me this around 1980, when I wasn't thinking about integration at all. “We'll get to that time,” I thought. “We don't need to be integrated.” 

「ビ・バップは国民の統合について表現したものだ」ディジー・ガレスピーは僕に、彼にしろチャーリー・パーカーにしろ、彼らの音楽によって統合「されてゆくこと」が目的なんだと言いました。ディジーが僕にこういったのは1980年頃で、当時僕の頭には統合のことは全くありませんでした。「その時代はいつか来るだろう。でもそんな必要はない」僕はそう考えていました。 

 

I had a problem with integration that went back to childhood. In 1969, when I was eight years old, my mother sent me to an “integrated” Catholic school in Kenner to honor the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. There were just two of us, me and my friend Greg Carroll, in a sea of white kids. Now, when you were one of just two kids going into a school full of students ― and teachers ― who were going to mess with you constantly, you did not want to be integrated. You couldn't come to another conclusion unless you were a masochist. The constant barrage wore on you and created a new kind of fatigue. My father once told me that he didn't encounter many white people growing up, so they didn't have a chance to disrespect him. Of course, the general abuse was so pervasive he shaped his aspirations to it. But he'd grown up in an entirely black world; he couldn't sit in the front of a streetcar until he was twenty-six years old. Before I started going to an integrated school, I hadn't encountered many white people, either; when a white man turned up at your door in Kenner, the kids on the block would want to know what your father had done to get into trouble. And when I did encounter them, it didn't go down well. Nicknames like “Bozo,” “Hershey Bar,” “Burnt toast” ― that was “Good morning,” “Hello,” and “Welcome.” 

「統合」と言うものについては、僕は子供の頃の遺恨がありました。1969年、僕が8歳の頃、母は僕を、ケナーにあるキング牧師記念「統合系」カトリックスクールへ入学させたのです。白人の子供達が大多数を占める中、黒人は僕と友人のグレッグ・キャロルのたった二人だけ。もし皆さんがこの「たった二人」だったら、「統合」されたくないはずです。何しろ生徒も先生もこちらを日常的にいじめてくる連中で溢れかえっている学校なのですから。いじめられるのが快感、というなら話は別ですけれどね。絶え間なくいじめの集中砲火を受けていると、それまで経験したことのない疲労感に襲われました。父はかつて言っていたのは、自分は大人になるまでの間、さほど多く白人と出会う機会が無かったので、蔑みを受けたこともなかったとのこと。勿論、社会全体としての不当な扱いは広く行き渡っており、父もそれに適合するようにはなっていました。しかし父は、完全に黒人しかいない環境で育ってきていましたから、26歳になるまではずっと、路面電車の前の方の席に座ることは許されませんでした。僕にしても、統合系の学校へ通いだす以前は、白人と出会うことはあまりなかったのです。ケナーでは、白人が家の玄関口にやってくると、その界隈の子供達はこぞって、その家の父親がトラブルに巻き込まれるような何かをしでかしたのではないか?と知りたがったものでした。そしていよいよ白人との出会いと言うものが本格化し、事態は良い方向へは進みませんでした。「Bozo(おバカさん)」「Hersley Bar(ハーシーのチョコレートバー)」「Burnt Toast(黒焦げのトースト)」といったニックネームは、「おはよう」「こんにちは」あるいは「ようこそ」といった挨拶程度の物言いだったのです(白人側にとっては)。