英日対訳・マイリー・サイラス「Miles to Go」

「ハンナ・モンタナ」で有名なマイリー・サイラスが16歳の時に書いた青春自叙伝を、英日対訳で読んでゆきます。

英日対訳:序章Moving to Higher Ground by W. Marsalis

Introduction 

“Now, That's Jazz” 

序章「そう、それがジャズってもんだ」 

 

Passing it on: Piano prodigy Wynton Kelly Guess receives hands-o instruction from Kwame Coleman (behind the pillar) and Eric Lewis. The great drummer Herlin Riley (second from right) is like my older brother. We both played with Danny Barker in New Orleans. I've worked with Eric Lewis and tenor saxophonist Walter Blanding (second from left) since they were teenagers. The other onlookers are proud papa Andre Guess (left) and our road manager, Raymond “Big Boss” Murphy, who for more than twenty years has made it possible for us to make gig after all across the country. 

<写真脚注> 

受け継いでゆくこと:ピアノの天才少年、ウィントン・ケリーゲス君が、ピアノの手ほどきを、クウェーム・コールマン(柱の向こう)とエリック・ルイスから受けているところです。名ドラマーのハーリン・ライリー(右から2番目)は、僕の兄貴分です。僕達二人は、ニューオーリンズのダニー・バーカーの処で演奏活動をしていました。エリック・ルイスと、テナーサックス奏者のウォルター・ブランディング(左から2番目)とは、10代の頃からの付き合いです。その他、見守っているのは、ケリー君が自慢のパパ、アンドレ・ゲス(左)そして、僕達のツアーマネージャーのレイモンド・マーフィー「大親分」。彼は20年以上に亘り、全米で公演を行い続ける切り盛りをしてくれています。 

 

In the early 1970s, in the wake of the civil rights movement, when James Brown, Marvin Gaye, and Stevie Wonder were the kings of Afro-American popular music, when people sported eight-inch afros and polyester leisure suits, when the scent of revolution still rode the wind, the last thing anyone hip was thinking about was handkerchief-head, Uncle Tommin', shufflin' and scratchin', grinning-for-tourists Dixiland music. Just the name alone made you hate it. So when my father said he was taking me and my brother Branford to play in a band for kids led by Danny Barker, the legendary banjo and guitar player, all we could envision was cartoon music or some type of old-fashioned obsequiousness. What was a banjo, anyway? Something they played for Frederick Douglass? Man, we're gonna miss running around on Saturday to go back to slavery days. Yay! 

1970年代初頭と言えば、公民権運動の直後でした。アフリカ系アメリカ人のポピュラーミュージシャンと言えば、その王座に君臨していたのは、ジェームス・ブラウンマービン・ゲイ、それからスティービー・ワンダー。人々は8インチ(約20センチ)のアフロヘアにポリエステルのレジャースーツでビシッと決めていた頃です。社会変革の余韻が未だ残っていた頃、流行の先端を行く人々なら考えもしないことといえば、ディキシーランド音楽、ヘアスタイルをキープするハンカチの頬かむり、白人に媚びを売る「アンクル・トム」、シャッフルリズムとひっかくようなサウンド、そして、観光客に歯をむき出しにして笑ってみせるスマイル。「ディキシーランド」と聞いただけで嫌悪感を覚えたものです。そんな中、僕の父は、僕と兄のブランフォードを連れ出し、子供達だけのバンドで演奏させようとしました。指導者はダニー・バーカー。バンジョーとギターのレジェンド的プレーヤーでした。といっても子供の僕達にとっては、テレビ漫画のBGMとか古臭い、何かこびへつらった曲を演奏する人?位しかイメージが描けませんでした。大体、バンジョーって何?って話です。歴史の授業で習ったフレデリック・ダグラスの為に弾く楽器か何か?やれやれ、折角の土曜日に駆けずり回って、奴隷制の歴史を振り返ってみましょうってか?ウレシイねぇ(笑) 

 

 

Actually, Danny Barker had played banjo and guitar with everybody from Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet to James P. Johnson and Cab Calloway, but we didn't know who any of those people were. We were living in Kenner, Louisiana, at the time. Branford was nine. I was eight. It took my father about half an hour to drive us into New Orleans, to the empty lot where Mr. Barker's Fairview Baptist Church Brass Band was rehearsing. 

確かにダニー・バーカーといえば、バンジョーとギターの共演者として名を連ねるのは、ルイ・アームストロングシドニー・ベシェ、それからジェームス・P・ジョンソンにキャブ・キャロウェイと、そうそうたる面々。でも当時僕達には全然わからない人達でした。僕は当時、ルイジアナ州のケナーという街に住んでいました。兄のブランフォードは9歳。僕は8歳でした。僕の父は1時間半車を飛ばし、ニューオーリンズにある、とある空家へとやってきたのです。そこでは、バーカー先生が指導するフェアビューバプテスト教会ブラスバンドが練習中でした。 

 

There we met an old man whom I presumed to be Mr. Barker. He was a colorful character, full of fire and stories well told. He loved New Orleans music and he loved kids. That day, he taught us the most profound lesson about playing jazz ― and about the possibility of a life of self-expression and mutual respect ― that I've ever encountered. 

会った瞬間、あ、この人がバーカー先生だな、と分かりました。彼は派手な性格の人で、熱意にあふれ、そして話好きででもありました。ニューオーリンズ音楽を愛し、そして子供好きでもあったのです。この日彼は、僕にとって生涯で最も心に残る教えを、ジャズの演奏、そして人生に起こりうるであろう自己表現と人間同士の尊重の念について示してくれることとなるのです。 

 

He started with the drums: “The bass drum and the cymbal are the key to the whole thing. We play in four. One, two, three, four. The bass drum plays on one and three and the cymbal on two and four. It's like they answer each other. So when the bass drum goes bummp, you answer with the cymbal ― chhh.”  

1        2    3       4 

bummp, chhh, bummp, chh 

1       2        3       4 

bummp, chh, bah-bummp bummp/chhh  

まずはドラムスから。「バスドラムとシンバルは、全体のカギとなるものだ。4拍子で行こう。1・2・3・4とね。バスドラムは1・3拍目。シンバルは2・4拍目。この二つはお互いに応答するような感じになる。つまり、バスドラムが「ドン」といえば、シンバルで「チャ」と返すってことだ。」 

 

“Now, on that second fourth beat, the cymbal and the bass drum agree with each other. And when you hit them two at the same time, now, that's jazz.” 

「さて、この時2回目の4拍目で、シンバルとバスドラムの意見が一致する。二つの楽器を同時に鳴らすと、そう、それがジャズってもんだ。」 

 

“You see,” he explained, “you gotta bounce around with your parts and you gotta skip the rhythm, just like you're dancing.” 

説明が続きます。「いいかな、自分のパートは、跳ね回るように、そしてリズムはスキップするように弾くこと。君がダンスを踊るようにね。」 

 

Then he went to the tuba. “Now, the tuba, that's the biggest instrument out here. You play big notes and leave space. Big things move slow.” He sang some tuba lines. “You are related to the bass drum. The two of y'all are down there, so you got to stay with each other. Y'all are the floor ― the foundation of the beat.” 

次はテューバの方へ向かいます。「さて、テューバだ。ここでは一番大きな楽器だ。長さの長い音符を担当して、間を取るんだ。ほら、何でも大きな物って、間を取りながら動くだろう?」テューバが吹くフレーズを歌って聞かせると、「君のパートは、バスドラムと結びついている。二人ともが下支えの処にいるから、動きをぴったりそろえること。君達は床 - つまり、拍の土台になる。」 

 

The tuba player started playing. Mr. Barker said, “You got to play with feeling. And when you play with feeling, on the bottom, you bounce.” So he started bouncing. Then the tuba and the drums started playing around. And he said, “You gotta mix it up and you gotta play together!” Then, after they made some low, grumbling noise, he said, “Now, that's jazz.” 

テューバを担当している子が楽器を吹き始めると、バーカー先生が指示を出します。「感情を込めて吹くんだ。その時、一番低い音を吹くときに、音符を弾ませること。」するとテューバの子は、弾むように吹き出します。そしてテューバとドラムスが、からみはじめます。先生の指示が飛びます。「しっかりまじりあって、そろって演奏すること!」すると、低くて唸るような「音」を立てたので、先生が言います。「そう、それがジャズってもんだ。」 

 

Then he turned to the trombone. “What do you have that nobody else has?” 

今度はトロンボーンの方を向きます。「他の子達になくて、君だけにあるのは何かな?」 

 

“The slide,” the boy said. 

「スライドです」とその子は答えます。 

 

“That's right. In jazz, you always hold up the thing that makes you different from other people. Be proud of being you. You play a low instrument. The lower you go, the slower the rhythms get. So I want you to play this kind of part.” And he sang the part. “Every now and then, rrrhhhhrrrraawwmmp, I want you to slide up, rip up, to a note. Tear it up.” The tuba, drums, and trombone started playing together and sounded terrible. But Mr. Barker said, “That's jazz music!” 

「その通り。ジャズを演奏するときは、いつだって、自分だけが持っているもの、そいつをしっかりと他の人達に示すこと。自分らしくられることを、他の人達に自慢しちゃおう。何と言っても低い音の楽器だ。音域が下がるほど、リズムだってゆっくりになってゆく。ということで、こんな感じのフレーズを吹いてごらん。」先生が歌って聞かせると、「時々、ルーオーアーってスライドを上げて行って、たどり着く音符を自分で決めて、それに向かって音を引き裂いてゆく感じで、ブアーっとやってみよう。」テューバ、ドラムス、そしてトロンボーンが一斉に演奏し出すと、ものすごい音がしました。しかしバーカー先生は、これを聞いて「それがジャズ音楽ってもんだ!」 

 

Then he addressed the trumpet players. He said, “Now, the trumpet is the lead instrument. You got to be strong. You play the melody.” So he taught us a melody. “Li'l Liza Jane.” We started playing. And after we'd played the melody and inflicted a few painful injuries, he said, “Play the notes with personality. Shake 'em! Play around with 'em. And play with rhythm. You've got to bounce, too.” Everything he wanted us to do he sang first. So we played the song with everyone else and it sounded like noise. Yeah, it definitely sounded terrible ,but it seemed like it might eventually be some kind of fun. 

次はトランペットの子達に声をかけます。「さぁ、トランペットはリード楽器といって、メロディを担当する。気持ちを強く持とう。」そして「リトル・リザ・ジェーン」のメロディを歌って教えます。僕達は吹き始めます。一通り吹くと、2・3か所大きな吹き間違えがありました。先生が指示を出します。「音符に君達らしさをつけて吹くこと。ガンガン行こう!どの音符も吹きまくっていきなさい。それからリズム感を出すこと。弾むように、とさっき言ったよね。」先生は、僕達にやらせようとすることを、まず自分が歌って聞かせます。その後に続いて、僕達は一緒に演奏するわけですが、出てくるのは騒音みたいな音です。そう、間違いなく、ものすごい音がします。でも演奏し終えてみると、何だか楽しい感じがしました。 

 

Then he went to the clarinet player. “Now, you see all these keys y'all got. You can play fast, play high, higher than a trumpet; you can play fast skips and trill and such. That makes you different from these trumpet players. I want y'all to do those things every now and then. Play the same melody as the trumpet but up one octave.” He sang the clarinet part, too. The clarinet players squeaked and squawked. Mr. Barker listened. Then he said, “Everything you do, you got to do with personality. Scoop and bend and slide those notes.” They tried to do that.   

そしてクラリネットの番が来ました。「ほら、ここにキーが色々付いているだろう。速い動きの音符が吹けるし、高い音、それもトランペットよりも高い音が吹ける。速いアルペジオだの、トリルだの、お手のものさ。これがトランペットとの違いだよ。時々こういうのを織り交ぜて吹くんだ。トランペットと同じメロディを、1オクターブ上でね。」先生はクラリネットのパートも歌って聞かせます。クラリネットの子達が、キーキー、ギャーギャーと音を鳴らすのを聞いて、先生の指示が飛びます。「演奏の全てに、自分らしさを出すこと。音符を、えぐって、ひん曲げて、滑らせてみよう。」皆頑張って、実行しようとしていました。 

 

Mr. Barker said, “That's jazz! Now, let's hear clarinets and trumpets on the melody. But when y'all play together, you got to talk to one another. The clarinet has to fill when the trumpet leaves space, and the trumpet needs to leave that space.” So we tried to play together. The clarinet played the melody up an octave, adding some fast notes but still squeaking and squawking. Terrible. Then Mr. Barker said, “Let's put it all together, 'Li'l Liza Jane.' “ It was the most cacophonous, disjointed thing you ever heard in your life. 

バーカー先生が言います。「それがジャズってもんだ。それじゃぁ皆で、メロディを吹いているクラリネットとトランペットを聴いてみよう。でも皆で一緒に演奏する時は、メロディであろうとなかろうと、お互い音で話しかけ合うことが必要なんだ。トランペットが間を取っているな、と思ったら、クラリネットはそこを埋めなきゃいけないよ。」ということで、僕達は、足並みをそろえて演奏しようと頑張りました。クラリネットは1オクターブ上でメロディを吹いて、速い動きの音符をいくつか加えつつ、しかし依然として、キーキー、ギャーギャー、は直りません。そしてバーカー先生は、というと、「よし、それじゃ全員一緒に「リトル・リザ・ジェーン」をいってみようか」史上最大の、不協和音、バラバラな演奏でした。 

 

“Gentlemen,” he enthusiastically concluded, “now, that's jazz.” 

「諸君。」熱血先生の、まとめのお言葉は「それがジャズってもんだ。」 

 

 

If you look at the New Orleans jazz scene today, a lot of the best musicians ― Lucien Barbarin (trombone), Shannon Powell (drums), Michael White (clarinet), Gregg Stafford (cornet), Herlin Riley (trumpet at that time, drums now) ― all played with Danny Barker's Fairview Baptist Church Brass Band over the years. So he was hearing something in us way back then. And he was teaching us something, too: You are creative, whoever you are. Respect your own creativity and respect the creativity and creative space of other people. 

現在のニューオーリンズ・ジャズの音楽シーンを彩る、最高のミュージシャン達の多く - ルシアン・バーバリン(トロンボーン)、シャノン・パウエル(ドラムス)、マイケル・ホワイト(クラリネット)、グレッグ・スタッフォード(コルネット)、ハーリン・ライリー(ドラムス) - 彼らは皆、ダニー・バーカーのフェアビュー・バブテスト教会のブラスバンドで数年間過ごしています(ハーリン・ライリーは当時はトランペットを吹いていました)。ですから先生は、当時の僕達の音を耳にしているわけです。僕達は、先生から大切なことを教わりもしたのです。人は誰しも、創造力がある。自分のそれを大切にすること。同時に、他の人が創造性を発揮するのを尊重すること。 

 

That was the first of many life lessons I've learned from jazz. We hear many things about jazz music these days: that it's only for connoisseurs and too difficult for most people to understand; that it has no identifiable fundamentals or objectives; that the best of it was played in the past in sparsely attended smoky clubs; and finally, that jazz itself is on the undertaker's table, one step from the cemetery. 

僕は今日まで、ジャズに多くを教えられてきましたが、この「創造力云々」こそが、最初の教えでした。今、ジャズというものに対しては、色々なことが沢山言われています。ジャズは、専門家でもない限り、大半の人には難しすぎて理解できない。「基本ここをおさえる」とか「ここがポイント」というのが、見えてこないし聞こえてこない。全盛は昔の話、それだって、客がまばらなタバコ臭いクラブでの話。挙句の果てには、ジャズ自体が、棺桶に片足を突っ込んでいるような状態だ、などと言われる始末。 

 

I've spent the last thirty years doing my best to demonstrate that these observations are just downright wrong. In this book I hope to deliver the positive message of America's greatest music: how great musicians demonstrate a mutual respect and trust on the bandstand that can alter your outlook on the world and enrich every aspect of your life ― from individual creativity and personal relationships to the way you conduct business and understand what it means to be a global citizen in the modern sense. 

僕はこれまで30年にわたり、こういった批評が完全に間違えである、ということを訴え続けています。この本で僕が伝えたいことは、我が国(アメリカ)が生んだ最高の音楽芸術が発信する、ポジティブなメッセージです。名人達が舞台上で示した、互いに対する敬意と信頼の念は、皆さんの世界観を変え、人生の局面の一つ一つを、豊かなものにしてくれるでしょう。皆さん一人一人の創造性や人とのつながりから始まって、そこから更には、仕事への取り組み方、「国際人とは何か」の時代に即した考え方まで・・・。 

 

Most activities that require a participating audience have a way of teaching the newcomer what he or she needs to know to best enjoy what's going on. Sporting events have announcers who interpret the action. Opera has helpful program notes or subtitles. Museums provide audio guides. In jazz, even for musicians, it's generally been “play what you feel,” “keep listening and you'll hear it.... one day,” or some other bit of cryptic advice that doesn't inform you but does make you feel unhip. “If you have to ask, you'll never know.” That's partly why the aesthetic of jazz remain a mystery to most people, even though the history of its greatest practitioners, from Louis Armstrong to Thelonious Monk to Marcus Roberts, shows that all of them shaered the same artistic objectives, which I'll explain more fully as we go along: swinging, playing blues, syncopating diverse material, composing new forms, improvising interactively, exhibiting home-spun virtuosity ― all aimed at tinterpreting the sweep and scope of modern life through the language of jazz. 

「興行」と名の付くものは、大概、初心者にその楽しみ方を指南してくれるものです。スポーツアナウンサーの実況解説、オペラを見に行った時のプログラム冊子やステージに映し出される字幕、博物館や美術館の音声ガイド。ところがジャズは、これまで大概、演奏する側でさえ、「感じるままに演奏しろ」「ずっと聴いていれば、いつか分かる」あるいは、何も伝わらない代わりに「ダサい」と思わせるしかないような、意味不明の解説がチラホラとあるだけでした。「質問しなきゃ分からないようじゃ、一生理解は無理だ。」などと言われますが、これは「ジャズとは何か?」ということが、大半の人々にとっては謎であるからこそ、飛び出してくる言葉であるとも言えます。でも実際は、ルイ・アームストロングセロニアス・モンク、マーカス・ロバーツといった偉大なアーティスト達の歴史が示すように、ジャズには共通するものがあるのです。 スウィング、ブルース、シンコペーション(様々なモチーフに工夫を凝らすこと)、新しい形式の創作、演奏者同士が連係プレーをとりながら行うインプロバイゼーション、「卓越した技を控えめに」という表現の仕方、これらは、後ほどたっぷり解説してまいりますが、いずれも、ジャズという言葉で世相を語ることを、ねらいとしています。 

 

I'd like to demystify listening to jazz and show you how the underlying ideas of this music can change your life. I'd like to help you feel the music and understand the differences between the sounds and personalities of the great musicians: Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Miles Davis, Ornette Coleman, Charlie Parker, Jelly Roll Morton, John Lewis, and more. I'll give you a glimpse of what goes on in the minds of musicians as we play, demonstrate the centrality of the blues, explain why jazz improvisation is different from all other forms of musical improvisation, and explore the creative tension between self-expression and self-sacrifice in jazz, a tension that is at the heart of swinging, in music and in life. 

この本では、まず、ジャズを聴くことの解りにくさから解消してゆきます。その上でジャズの根底に流れる発想は、皆さんの人生を変えることができる、ということを御覧に入れたいと思います。ディジー・ガレスピー、ビリー・ホリデー、マイルス・デイビスオーネット・コールマンチャーリー・パーカージェリー・ロール・モートンジョン・ルイス等々、名人達の奏でる音楽の感じ方と、それぞれのサウンドや個性の違いの聞き分け方を、皆さんが身に着けてゆくお手伝いをさせていただきます。その為に、僕達ミュージシャンが、演奏中何を考えているか、頭の中をチラッとだけお見せしましょう。それから、ブルースがジャズの中心に居座るそのワケは?ジャズのインプロバイゼーションは、他の音楽形式のとは異なっているのですが、そのワケは?こういったことをお話ししてゆきます。そして、ジャズの持つ、創造性のせめぎ合いについて、詳しく見てゆきます。この「せめぎ合い」は、自己主張と自己犠牲の間に発生するものです。同時にこれは、スウィングの核心に存在するだけでなく、音楽に、ひいては人生にも存在するものです。 

 

Along the way, I want to pass on some of the lessons the music has given me through the years, lessons about art and life that I hope will help you find ― or hold on to ― the proper balance between your right to express yourself and have things your own way, your responsibility to respect others while working with them toward a common goal. That's what Danny Barker taught us to do ― to enjoy ourselves and one another. And through this music I hope you will be able to do that, too. 

同時に、ジャズが長年にわたって僕に与え続けてくれる教訓を、皆さんにもお伝えしてゆきたいと思います。芸術活動、そして人生についての、これらの教訓は、皆さんにとっても役に立つことを願っています。それは何かというと、皆さんが他の人々と共通の目標に向かってコラボする時、「権利」としての自己主張と我儘、そして「義務」としての他者の尊重、この「権利」と「義務」のバランスを、きちんと理解し、あるいは維持すること、これに他なりません。自分が楽しみ、同時に、お互いに楽しむ。これを実行しろ、というのが、ダニー・バーカーの教えであり、皆さんにもそうあってほしい、と、僕は願わずにはいられません。 

 

Wynton Marsalis 

ウィントン・マルサリスより。